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Which primer do I use?


bbabythai

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1- is for interior...so nope.

 

second is a sealer, not a primer...so nope.

 

What i did i went to the homepro/watsadu and bought the most expensive wallpaint (the one that lasts for 8 years or so) from the brand Nippon...they also have a primer from same brand...and they can mix your paint in any color you like.

 

It's worth to pay a little extra for the paint so it lasts longer. Painting is a hell of a job in the heat.

 

There also is an epoxy coating as a 3rd layer, i don't know anything about that but wonder if it makes paint last longer.

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12 minutes ago, Thian said:

1- is for interior...so nope.

 

second is a sealer, not a primer...so nope.

 

What i did i went to the homepro/watsadu and bought the most expensive wallpaint (the one that lasts for 8 years or so) from the brand Nippon...they also have a primer from same brand...and they can mix your paint in any color you like.

 

It's worth to pay a little extra for the paint so it lasts longer. Painting is a hell of a job in the heat.

 

There also is an epoxy coating as a 3rd layer, i don't know anything about that but wonder if it makes paint last longer.

its internal... no rain exposure. 

 

A painter told me to use the 1st tin. but I thought it might be the 2nd?

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Jotun is a popular brand but not sure "Majestic" is its premium grade.  (?)  Premium grade is a must for me.  And a good primer will be specific about the surface(s) it is intended.  They will also specific how much thinning (usually up to 10%) it can take.

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Does the sealer have any info on it? I'm guessing it can be painted on without primer.

If the sealer has primer qualities, I would use the thickest of the two.

Or if you have both at your disposal use sealer first then primer over the top.

 

Looks like walls have curing to do. Wait before painting.

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32 minutes ago, stud858 said:

Does the sealer have any info on it? I'm guessing it can be painted on without primer.

If the sealer has primer qualities, I would use the thickest of the two.

Or if you have both at your disposal use sealer first then primer over the top.

 

Looks like walls have curing to do. Wait before painting.

I don't really see the point in priming over a sealer or for using a sealer at all in this case.  Whatever.

 

I second the waiting period though.  Let the render cure and (probably) develop some cracks (unless you had a true pro).  If the cracks are the hairline variety, a good primer will fill those in.

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19 minutes ago, bankruatsteve said:

I don't really see the point in priming over a sealer or for using a sealer at all in this case.  Whatever.

 

I second the waiting period though.  Let the render cure and (probably) develop some cracks (unless you had a true pro).  If the cracks are the hairline variety, a good primer will fill those in.

Its more for the point of two coats are better than one. And if you've already got the paint why not. It will make two coats of the final color be a better result.

 

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Its my understanding that a sealer is used mainly on existing surfaces that may have a oil base or dirt and grease or new plaster where salts and efflorescence are likely to grin though.

I call it obliterating coat.

 

A primer is then painted to ensure your top coat sticks and bonds well.

The sealer coat is not a primer or undercoat.

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There are 2 variations on primer for concrete 1 can be used immediately the render is dry , so within a couple of days. The other can only be used over old concrete so a minimum of 30 days. Good paint shops and probably  even the big Global House, DoHome, Thai Watsadu etc. Will be able to tell you which one is which.

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I suggest that you use Dulux Power Primer. You can buy a big can (5USG)  for less than 3000thb. I think you can add up to 10% thinners as it is quite thick undiluted. DPP can also be used on old concrete. Buy  a quality thinner but you do not need to buy the expensive Dulux one ... like I did... and was told after that I wasted some money.

 

As said above ... two coats of primer ...

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