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Man Claims Cheap Dog Deworming Medicine Cured His Terminal Cancer


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An Oklahoma man who was once diagnosed with small-cell lung cancer and told hat he only had three months live claims he is now tumor-free thanks to a $5 deworming drug usually meant for dogs.

 

Joe Tippens was diagnosed with small-cell lung cancer in 2016. Despite undergoing treatment for the disease, by January of 2017, the cancer had spread to other organs, including his stomach, neck, pancreas and even his bones. The cancer was everywhere and doctors advised him to go home and say his goodbyes because he only had three months to live. When small-cell cancer spreads as wide as it had in his case, the chances of survival are around one percent. Tippens thought he was going to die, and with nothing left to lose, he was willing to try anything in hopes of a miracle, even a dog dewormer called fenbendazole.

 

The desperate cancer sufferer stumbled upon the bizarre treatment while browsing a forum of his alma mater, Oklahoma State University. The post that caught his eye read “If you have cancer or know someone who does, give me a shout”. Joe had already signed up for an experimental treatment that doctors said wouldn’t save him but might extend his life expectancy from three months to a year, enough to at least meet his grandson. But he decided that contacting that forum poster couldn’t hurt either. To his surprise, that person was a veterinarian who had a very interesting story to tell.

 

The vet told Joe that scientists had accidentally discovered that a dog de-worming drug seemed to attack cancer cells in mice. One of the scientists who conducted the research had been diagnosed with stage 4 brain cancer and had been giving the same grim prognosis as Joe, but she started popping dog deworming pills and within six weeks her cancer was gone. Obviously, Joe was intrigued.

 

Tippens stayed in the clinical trial his doctors had suggested, but also placed an order for fenbendazole, the canine drug the veterinarian mentioned. He didn’t tell his physicians about it though. Three months later, when he had another PET scan to check the spread of his cancer, he was shocked to learn that there was no sign of the tumors anywhere in his body.

“Three months earlier…There was cancer in my body from head to toe. And it was a terrifyingly dangerous metastasis that leaves virtually 100% of its victims dead within 3 months,” Joe said. “Here I was 3 months later and the PET scan was completely dark……void of any light…..anywhere.”

 

In September 2017, Joe went for yet another scan which again showed he was cancer-free. This time he told his doctor about the fenbendazole, but there was no way to prove that the deworming drug had cured him. He had also been taking vitamin E supplements, CBD and bioavailable curcumin, plus there was also the clinical trial the doctors suggested. The funny thing about that experimental drug was that out of the 1,100 patients on that clinical trial, Joe was the only one cleared of cancer.

 

“My insurance company spent $1.2 million on me with traditional means before I switched to a $5 a week medicine that actually saved me,” Joe said, making sure to mention that he is not a doctor. “I am not prescribing medicine and I am not qualified to give advice on medical treatments. BUT…..I am qualified to tell my story to as many people as possible.”

 

Joe Tippens story has caught the attention of the president of the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, Dr Stephen Prescott, who said he is working on case study report about the cancer-fighting properties of fenbendazole.

 

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If this is really true, Big Pharma will step in. The will do two things, make sure they take it out of the market or bring it on the market under an other name and raise the price from $5.00 to $20.000. An other thing they will do is publish a false research report about the deadly contra indications taking this drug.

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1 hour ago, wombat said:

my question would be what prompted the first person to eat de-worming tablets ?

it was the CBD what done it.

I think that was explained in the part about the  observations of the  Vet.

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1 minute ago, UnkleGoooose said:

And that they were testing on mice. Why read when others can explain it for you.

Yes.

"The vet told Joe that scientists had accidentally discovered that a dog de-worming drug seemed to attack cancer cells in mice. One of the scientists who conducted the research had been diagnosed with stage 4 brain cancer and had been giving the same grim prognosis as Joe, but she started popping dog deworming pills and within six weeks her cancer was gone. ."

 

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In doing a little online research which confirmed there is some good evidence to support the  claim I also came across an alarming piece of information.

The  production cost of fenbendazole is between 2 >6 US cents per dose and is listed on the WHO as an essential medicine.

It costs  $201 per dose in the US.

 You  lucky suckers !

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the last time a dude stood by his guns about discovering a cure for Cancer, he was Indicted

 

BigPharma is more powerful than Sony Music

 

 

Poor old Johnny Appleseed jumped down from his tree and was spreading the word about Vitamin B17

 

maybe a deWormed doggie peessed on the tree trunk?

 

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44 minutes ago, Dumbastheycome said:

Y One of the scientists who conducted the research had been diagnosed with stage 4 brain cancer and had been giving the same grim prognosis as Joe, but she started popping dog deworming pills and within six weeks her cancer was gone. ."

 

I guarantee this is a a direct out and out lie. This scientist and her diagnosis will not even exist, not even as a half truth. This is clearly made up from beginning to end. In today's world there is no shame in just making something up which is clearly disprovable. Remember this?

 

"Annabelle Natalie "Belle" Gibson (born October 8, 1991)[1][2] is an Australian scammer, social media influencer, and alternative health advocate. Throughout her career as a wellness guru, Gibson claimed she had a diagnosis involving multiple cancer pathologies throughout her internal organs; claimed she had forgone modern science-based medical treatments; claimed she was effectively self-managing her multiple cancers through diet, exercise, and alternative therapies; and claimed to have donated significant proportions of her income and her company's profits to numerous charities. All of these claims were later found to be fraudulent by the Australian media and legal system.:

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"the last time a dude stood by his guns about discovering a cure for Cancer, he was Indicted

BigPharma is more powerful than Sony Music

Poor old Johnny Appleseed jumped down from his tree and was spreading the word about Vitamin B17"

 

Vitamin B17??? 

 

Amygdalin from apricot kernels has been wrongly labelled a vitamin, but it is not and there have been no trials on it which prove anything other than it can cause cyanide poisoning...........go ask Steve McQueen if it works!!

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3 minutes ago, partington said:

I guarantee this is a a direct out and out lie. This scientist and her diagnosis will not even exist, not even as a half truth. This is clearly made up from beginning to end. In today's world there is no shame in just making something up which is clearly disprovable. Remember this?

 

"Annabelle Natalie "Belle" Gibson (born October 8, 1991)[1][2] is an Australian scammer, social media influencer, and alternative health advocate. Throughout her career as a wellness guru, Gibson claimed she had a diagnosis involving multiple cancer pathologies throughout her internal organs; claimed she had forgone modern science-based medical treatments; claimed she was effectively self-managing her multiple cancers through diet, exercise, and alternative therapies; and claimed to have donated significant proportions of her income and her company's profits to numerous charities. All of these claims were later found to be fraudulent by the Australian media and legal system.:

You  may be   right. But in other more scholarly articles  there is  a similar claim that is  apparently  verified.

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4 minutes ago, partington said:

I guarantee this is a a direct out and out lie. This scientist and her diagnosis will not even exist, not even as a half truth. This is clearly made up from beginning to end. In today's world there is no shame in just making something up which is clearly disprovable. Remember this?

 

"Annabelle Natalie "Belle" Gibson (born October 8, 1991)[1][2] is an Australian scammer, social media influencer, and alternative health advocate. Throughout her career as a wellness guru, Gibson claimed she had a diagnosis involving multiple cancer pathologies throughout her internal organs; claimed she had forgone modern science-based medical treatments; claimed she was effectively self-managing her multiple cancers through diet, exercise, and alternative therapies; and claimed to have donated significant proportions of her income and her company's profits to numerous charities. All of these claims were later found to be fraudulent by the Australian media and legal system.:

We had a similar "guru" in NZ who touted his '"electric box cancer cure'' but which turned out to be a fake, but he took folks money and gave them false hope.

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21 minutes ago, xylophone said:

We had a similar "guru" in NZ who touted his '"electric box cancer cure'' but which turned out to be a fake, but he took folks money and gave them false hope.

Yeah they brought those boxes over here and sold them, for millions, to the army as bomb detectors.

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1 hour ago, xylophone said:

We had a similar "guru" in NZ who touted his '"electric box cancer cure'' but which turned out to be a fake, but he took folks money and gave them false hope.

False hope is Placebo is sometimes effective. Religion can't without it.

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3 hours ago, xylophone said:

We had a similar "guru" in NZ who touted his '"electric box cancer cure'' but which turned out to be a fake, but he took folks money and gave them false hope.

I'd say the really big difference in the two situations is that the one involving the charlatan in NZ with a "snake oil" cure was doing it purely to rip off and victimize the desperately ill, but the other guy isn't claiming to be a "guru" in any way, didn't claim to invent anything and isn't trying to sell anything to anyone -- just telling the world what happened to him. Why should be be criticized about that?

 

If I were in his situation of being riddled with cancer, I'm sure I'd be willing to try a dog de-worming medicine (or maybe even dog urine) if there was any documented cases of it being a successful cure. And if I felt there was any chance that it was key in healing me, I'd feel a VERY strong obligation to spread the word (even if it meant people ridiculing me for promoting what they think is quack medicine).  

 

If there is something widely helpful to cancer victims in this (possibly) overlooked medicine, it will be interesting to see how big-pharma reacts. A truly cheap and effective cure for cancer is the last thing they want and would jeopardize billions of dollars in profits from chemo and other cancer drugs. You can be sure they'd pull no punches at all and do everything to get it off the shelves and labeled as poison by the useless and obliging US FDA. 

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9 hours ago, wombat said:

my question would be what prompted the first person to eat de-worming tablets ?

it was the CBD what done it.

They discovered the drug cured cancer in mice so if you have nothing to lose you will take it.

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7 hours ago, emptypockets said:

I now a bloke who tried this but sadly he passed away. 

He was sitting in the middle of the road licking his balls and a bus hit him. 

 

 

You "now" a bloke? As opposed to "then" a bloke?

 

 

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11 hours ago, Inn Between said:

I'd say the really big difference in the two situations is that the one involving the charlatan in NZ with a "snake oil" cure was doing it purely to rip off and victimize the desperately ill, but the other guy isn't claiming to be a "guru" in any way, didn't claim to invent anything and isn't trying to sell anything to anyone -- just telling the world what happened to him. Why should be be criticized about that?

 

If I were in his situation of being riddled with cancer, I'm sure I'd be willing to try a dog de-worming medicine (or maybe even dog urine) if there was any documented cases of it being a successful cure. And if I felt there was any chance that it was key in healing me, I'd feel a VERY strong obligation to spread the word (even if it meant people ridiculing me for promoting what they think is quack medicine).  

 

If there is something widely helpful to cancer victims in this (possibly) overlooked medicine, it will be interesting to see how big-pharma reacts. A truly cheap and effective cure for cancer is the last thing they want and would jeopardize billions of dollars in profits from chemo and other cancer drugs. You can be sure they'd pull no punches at all and do everything to get it off the shelves and labeled as poison by the useless and obliging US FDA. 

I was referencing this by partington...........

 

""Annabelle Natalie "Belle" Gibson (born October 8, 1991)[1][2] is an Australian scammer, social media influencer, and alternative health advocate. Throughout her career as a wellness guru, Gibson claimed she had a diagnosis involving multiple cancer pathologies throughout her internal organs; claimed she had forgone modern science-based medical treatments; claimed she was effectively self-managing her multiple cancers through diet, exercise, and alternative therapies; and claimed to have donated significant proportions of her income and her company's profits to numerous charities. All of these claims were later found to be fraudulent by the Australian media and legal system.:

 

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Having been recently diagnosed with PC I can assure you every bit of available information is genuinely read, sorting it is a real dilemma.

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On 5/3/2019 at 2:30 PM, wombat said:

my question would be what prompted the first person to eat de-worming tablets ?

it was the CBD what done it.

"The desperate cancer sufferer stumbled upon the bizarre treatment while browsing a forum of his alma mater, Oklahoma State University. The post that caught his eye read “If you have cancer or know someone who does, give me a shout”. Joe had already signed up for an experimental treatment that doctors said wouldn’t save him but might extend his life expectancy from three months toa year, enough to at least meet his grandson. But he decided that contacting that forum poster couldn’t hurt either. To his surprise, that person was a veterinarian who had a very interesting story to tell".

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  • 2 weeks later...

He likes nothing better than curling up in front of the fire and lick his balls, now.

 

A man walked into a  Pub and saw a Dog licking his balls, The man said to the Bar tender, "wish i could do that" The, Bartender said give him a biscuit and he might let you.

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