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Thai driving licences: Those with certain diseases to be barred - Big Bike confirmed as 400cc up


rooster59

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Thai driving licences: Those with certain diseases to be barred - Big Bike confirmed as 400cc up

 

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Image: Thai Rath

 

For the first time the Department of Land Transport has acknowledged that most of the accidents on Thai roads are caused by people - the drivers and riders themselves. 

 

So in an effort to address the appalling carnage on the roads that sees upwards of 20,000 deaths a year the DLT are proposing new measures to modernize the application for licences and the issuing of licence extensions. 

 

The latest plan is to prohibit anyone with a congenital disease (roke prajam tua) from driving. 

 

The DLT plan to contact the health authorities to determine what diseases should be on the list of those that make it dangerous to operate a motor vehicle, said deputy chief Yongyuth Nakdaeng yesterday. 

 

Thai Rath also confirmed that the term Big Bike that is bandied about in the news refers to 400cc and up machines.

 

In future riders of these will have to undergo special training in order to get a motorcycle licence as the power of the machines has been deemed to make them especially dangerous.

 

They should therefore be considered separate to smaller bikes. 

 

These regulations will come in within 120 days.

 

Source: Thai Rath

 

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-- © Copyright Thai Visa News 2020-08-22
 
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17 minutes ago, rooster59 said:

They should therefore be considered separate to smaller bikes. 

Still amazing that a near non existing tutoring session/office yard test allows you to drive motorbikes up to 400ccm.

Even a "teenage bike" (Honda Wave/Click etc) can easily make up to a 100 km/h (~60 mph).

Compare that to rules in a nanny state (like Germany).

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14 minutes ago, scubascuba3 said:

Weird that they scapegoat those with congenital disease, but the much bigger problem is drink, no helmet, no licence, speeding, how about law enforcement?

and driving under the influence of drugs!!!

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11 minutes ago, scubascuba3 said:

Weird that they scapegoat those with congenital disease, but the much bigger problem is drink, no helmet, no licence, speeding, how about law enforcement?

It is much easier to make new additional laws. 

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They will do well to start with those who drive/ride without licenses at all or suspend or disqualified ones before they worry about engine sizes...

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Always make new law's whitch cost much money! And then nobody give a F.... about law's! Useless! Law about use underwear ridiculous! Law and new law.... Also why let these home made Kubota's drive in road! Whit out lights, some other leg grave grandpa driving it, hes dog's follow it and don't care traffic! Nobody don't watch also what kind sht truck's driving in roads! Really dangerous , run 20 kilometer/ houer , huge overload! 

My wife brother drive truck, i ask him once what about overload (sugar cane was on load) was 20 tons over <deleted>!He drive 10 days in nonstop! When he sleep i dont know! I take one time bus(last bus ever) from Loei to Bangkok! 11 houer same driver and we not stop even one time! Nobody don't watch driving times here ! In Finland truck drivers need take break always after 2 houer drive! Tachograph show that all do that!

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Drink or drugs or a combination are the cause of many road deaths some drunk on a scooter just missed my car this morning whilst I was out shopping he was all over the place doing no more than 15/20 mms it was clear he was under the influence I would of put him at around 40/45 years of age and definitely a Thai.

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2 hours ago, rooster59 said:

The latest plan is to prohibit anyone with a congenital disease (roke prajam tua) from driving. 

And that is a completely wrong - unfair and, frankly, perplexingly incomprehensible - approach that will do nothing to reduce the appalling traffic casualty figures.

 

Just because someone suffers from vitiligo, an allergy, an inherited genetic disease or something similar does NOT automatically mean that they're unfit to steer a vehicle.

 

The really underlying problems - such as insufficient driver training, the failure to instill in drivers a sense of steering their vehicles safely and with foresight for themselves and others, the prevailing disregard for almost every traffic law, as well as appallingly lax vehicle maintenance - once again have NOT been addressed.    

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Maybe I missed it but will people with existing licences and "big" bikes have to change or redo their licences or will they be able to continue to ride on as normal

 

Will foreign bike licences be sufficient to cover the new Thai regulations?......

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Don't follow too close.

Turn your lights on when raining and at night LOL!

Don't drive the wrong way.

Use your turn signal.

Don't drive too fast.

More drivers education in all forms on all media platforms.

There those simple actions should save Thailand.  

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1 hour ago, scubascuba3 said:

Weird that they scapegoat those with congenital disease, but the much bigger problem is drink, no helmet, no licence, speeding, how about law enforcement?

Quite simple to explain......instead of analysing data, developing, then executing a plan to reduce death on the roads (ready, aim, fire) the Thais prefer, for reasons known only to the elites, to ignore data, announce a plan, then don't enforce it. This is aka the fire, aim, ready method of doing things....preferably involving lots and lots of committees, sub-committees, meetings and press conferences to announce crackdowns, and to call Thailand a 'hub' of something. Sorry to be cynical but I've lived here for some time.

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I'm with them on this regards people with diseases.

There is a old Canadian bloke called Bryan who's former girlfriend is Jezebel June and he has Parkinson's disease and still rides his motorbike around Ban Chang when he's there.

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46 minutes ago, Captain_Bob said:

"Big Bike confirmed as 400cc up"

 

Sales of 350cc bikes up 200%!!! 🏍️

You mean BADGES saying 350 cc sales go up. If the badge on the side says 350, how will the cops know different?

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You can come up with all you like but if there's no enforcement then all is useless.

First make sure you change your corrupt police force with a competent police force.

So start by sacking all police officers and start from scratch. But this will never happen.

 

There's is one advantage tough that this corrupt police now is able to fleece more (future) tourists.

 

 

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2 hours ago, scubascuba3 said:

Weird that they scapegoat those with congenital disease, but the much bigger problem is drink, no helmet, no licence, speeding, how about law enforcement?

Unfortunately enforcing existing, or new traffic laws is the responsibility of the police, not the Department of Land Transport. We can confidently expect any enforcement activity to be concentrated around "going home time" on a payday.

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2 hours ago, KhunBENQ said:

Still amazing that a near non existing tutoring session/office yard test allows you to drive motorbikes up to 400ccm.

Even a "teenage bike" (Honda Wave/Click etc) can easily make up to a 100 km/h (~60 mph).

Compare that to rules in a nanny state (like Germany).

The fine for not having a licence is 200bht.

Nobody will bother to get a licence, and just drive their bikes without one.

And if you don't have a licence, no point in paying for tax and insurance either.

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44 minutes ago, Pedrogaz said:

Quite simple to explain......instead of analysing data, developing, then executing a plan to reduce death on the roads (ready, aim, fire) the Thais prefer, for reasons known only to the elites, to ignore data, announce a plan, then don't enforce it. This is aka the fire, aim, ready method of doing things....preferably involving lots and lots of committees, sub-committees, meetings and press conferences to announce crackdowns, and to call Thailand a 'hub' of something. Sorry to be cynical but I've lived here for some time.

Sad to say but if they did things as they should we probably wouldn't be here because it would be a different country

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Many older expats with big bikes like Harleys or by the way any bike over 400cc won't be very happy, some have driven big bikes most of their lives and now they're going to have to pass I don't know what kind of ridiculous test! 🥴 

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3 hours ago, KhunBENQ said:

Still amazing that a near non existing tutoring session/office yard test allows you to drive motorbikes up to 400ccm.

Even a "teenage bike" (Honda Wave/Click etc) can easily make up to a 100 km/h (~60 mph).

Compare that to rules in a nanny state (like Germany).

I ride BMW 1000c in England , If 400cc is classed as a big bike ,what would my 1000c cc bike be classed as.

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3 hours ago, rooster59 said:

Thai Rath also confirmed that the term Big Bike that is bandied about in the news refers to 400cc and up machines.

 

In future riders of these will have to undergo special training in order to get a motorcycle licence as the power of the machines has been deemed to make them especially dangerous.

And where will riders of these bikes be able to find this special training? Is the government, even as I type this, training experts who will then be available throughout the country to pass this knowledge on?

 

I paid for 3 days of training at a driving school prior to getting my motorcycle licence and it was a farce. I naively thought that the 3 days would be spent showing me the correct way to ride a motorcycle, what I actually got was a list of the highway code questions in English and was told to study them for the first day.

 

They had a fingerprint sign-in system and on the 2nd day they had me ride round the test course twice and then left me to look at the highway code again for the rest of the morning. At lunchtime they did the fingerprint thing and then told me to go home and come back at 5pm at which point they had me do they fingerprint sign-in and told me I was finished for the day.

 

The third day they had me take the test and that was it. Can't wait to see what the special training will consist of.

 

 

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