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In the UK, why is the steering wheel on the right side of the car? Why are the lanes on the other side, too?


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A very long time ago in fact. So long ago that the indigenous people of a place that would come to be known as the United States of America were quite happily sitting in the middle of their horses and would remain happy for more than another 200 years.

OK, it’s the 16th Century…around 1530…June…10th…between lunch time and afternoon tea.

Anyway, in a place that the French called, le grande breton, or the big stone, …

…you see, as the French looked out from their Northern shore they could see a rock, which they called Breton and a much bigger rock which with typical Gallic flair and imagination they simply called le grande breton.

Sometimes the simplest thing is the most elegant, don’t you agree?

Anyway, back to the point…

Read on...

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Yeah i know history about driving left! UK people never give up they tradition's even maybe othey way is much better!

Using the left lane and left hand to chance gear's! Hmmm... what can say:

 

English word "left" comes from the Anglo-Saxon word "lyft", meaning weak or broken!

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Here's another theory on this subject that pushes all the way back to ancient Rome :

https://www.businessinsider.com/uk-china-countries-drive-left-side-road-traffic-ancient-rome-sword-fight-2016-12

 

 

Some 76 countries and territories use left-hand traffic, and the practice is believed to have originated in ancient Rome to help defend against enemy attacks.

Following is a transcript of the video.

Why do some countries drive on the left side of the road? Most of the world drives on the right side of the road. But around 76 countries and territories use left-hand traffic.

The practice is believed to date back to ancient Rome. Romans steered their carts and chariots with the left hand, to free up the right so they could use weapons to defend against enemy attacks.

This carried over into medieval Europe and in 1773, the British government passed measures to make left-hand traffic the law. But post revolution France favored the right.

Napoleon was left-handed, and riding on the right proved to be an intimidating military tactic. Britain and France brought their driving styles to their respective colonies. That's why many former British territories are among the few modern left-hand-traffic countries.

In the US, right-hand traffic goes back to the 18th century. Freight wagons were pulled by teams of horses. and the drivers rode on the left rear horse, using their right hand to more easily control the team. Traffic shifted to the right so drivers could easily avoid collisions.

Eventually, with the rise of the automobile and increase in global traffic, many countries switched to the right to fit in with neighbors — including Samoa, which just switched from the left in 2009.

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59 minutes ago, stouricks said:

So then, why SHOULD Thais drive on the left as well?

And why did Sweden change over to the right on one night many years ago?

Just asking.

Because Thai driving laws are based on the UK Highway Code, plus it's the correct side 😉

 

Burma/Myanmar changed lanes overnight too, not very long ago, on the whim of the prime minister being told it was good luck for the country, not so lucky for people exiting buses into the traffic lanes!! 🙂 

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Thailand drives on the left....So another story goes, because the British made a gift of the latest Rolls Royce to the king at the time. Before Siam had cars--with of course right hand steering wheel.

 

35% of the world drive this way.

 

 

 

Edited by sanuk711
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