Jump to content

Recommended Posts

3 minutes ago, oldcpu said:

Following the Thai requirement to carry one's passport every day is a lot more than to the DLT once every 5 years .

There is no such requirement.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 360
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

You will hear shouts for and against equally strong. There are MANY topic on this item.   Personally, it was easily obtained, better to have than not have, convenient for some things as you

Just to make it clear: yellow book is the first step and the real "hurdle" (sometimes easy, sometimes not)? After that the pink ID should not make much headache.

I the last few months i have spent a few days in hospital twice ,my wife and son deal with everything ,i am sure that by having the pink card ,the cost was very low as were my meds ,

Posted Images

2 minutes ago, jackdd said:

There is no such requirement.

Indeed there is not for going to DLT. I was simply repeating what you stated.

 

But foreigners are required to carry passport (where I have found pink-ID suffices)

Edited by oldcpu
Link to post
Share on other sites

Everywhere i have ever shown it it has been accepted ,thank goodness i had one as the wife registered me on the Mor Phrom app for the jab ,got it when they said .

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 minutes ago, oldcpu said:

But foreigners are required to carry passport (where I have found pink-ID suffices)

You realize that you contradict yourself?

Foreigners are not required to carry their passport. Everybody in Thailand (nothing special for foreigners) is required to be able to identify himself.

Can be a passport, or the pink ID card as you figured out already, or a Thai driving license.

A Thai driving license with passport number on it does obviously have advantages over a pink ID card, because if in doubt they can easily look up your immigration status based on the details on the driving license.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Just got off my *** to apply for the pink card.........told I had to have my passport translated.......then told it had to be an official translation....then told the passport has to be certified by my embassy before they will translate it...................REALLY??????

Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, Surelynot said:

Just got off my *** to apply for the pink card.........told I had to have my passport translated.......then told it had to be an official translation....then told the passport has to be certified by my embassy before they will translate it...................REALLY??????

 

The first part of this (translation)  is standard. And most Ampurs do require that it by translated officially by the MoFA. A few only let you use a private translation service.

 

The second part makes no sense, since a passport is already officially issued by your government. You will find that the MoFA does nto require anything from your Embassy to do the translation.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
43 minutes ago, Surelynot said:

Just got off my *** to apply for the pink card.........told I had to have my passport translated.......then told it had to be an official translation....then told the passport has to be certified by my embassy before they will translate it...................REALLY??????

 

Those details are in the wrong order..

 

3 Items for this step: 

- Embassy Certified Copy of your Passport (ID page)

- Translation of Embassy Certified Copy of your Passport (approved translation service)

- MFA Verification of the translation. 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, oldcpu said:

Following the Thai requirement to carry one's passport every day is a lot more than to the DLT once every 5 years .

Is that law ever enforced, I've never known anyone to carry their passport in all my nearly 30 years here? 

I've never been randomly asked for mine. 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, richard_smith237 said:

 

Those details are in the wrong order..

 

3 Items for this step: 

- Embassy Certified Copy of your Passport (ID page)

- Translation of Embassy Certified Copy of your Passport (approved translation service)

- MFA Verification of the translation. 

 

 

There is no certifying body for translations in Thailand. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Neeranam said:
3 hours ago, richard_smith237 said:

 

Those details are in the wrong order..

 

3 Items for this step: 

- Embassy Certified Copy of your Passport (ID page)

- Translation of Embassy Certified Copy of your Passport (approved translation service)

- MFA Verification of the translation. 

 

 

There is no certifying body for translations in Thailand. 

 

I didn’t write that there is: 

 

 

The British Embassy ‘Certifies’ a Copy of your passport. 

 

An ‘Approved’ Translation service Translates the Certified Copy of the Passport in to Thai.

 

The MFA Verifies / legalises (with a stamp) the Translation of the Certified Copy of the Passport. 

 

 

You may be getting your undies in a ’twist’ about my comment that an ‘approved' translation service should be used - here is the explanation of that.... 

 

A Translation is often rejected if the MFA does not recognise the translation service used. Which is why its always recommended to use one of the translation services at the MFA building or a company / service who confirms they have regular dealings sending translations to the MFA.

 

 

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

To be clear.

The translations of those documents is for your Yellow book. Once you have the Yellow book, it's a simple process to get the Pink card. I got both of mine at the same time, just a different counter.

Also, I believe the reason for the translation is just to get your name translated into Thai. If you're married to a Thai the amphur or khet might accept your marriage certificate as proof of translation, mine did.

You might also be asked for a translation of your parent's names. I got one of the girls in the office to do the translation for me (Not official) and it was accepted.

Each amphur or khet will have their own set of rules.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, richard_smith237 said:

 

I didn’t write that there is: 

 

 

The British Embassy ‘Certifies’ a Copy of your passport. 

 

An ‘Approved’ Translation service Translates the Certified Copy of the Passport in to Thai.

 

The MFA Verifies / legalises (with a stamp) the Translation of the Certified Copy of the Passport. 

 

 

You may be getting your undies in a ’twist’ about my comment that an ‘approved' translation service should be used - here is the explanation of that.... 

 

A Translation is often rejected if the MFA does not recognise the translation service used. Which is why its always recommended to use one of the translation services at the MFA building or a company / service who confirms they have regular dealings sending translations to the MFA.

 

 

 

 

 

I'm just saying there is no such thing as a certified translation, nothing in a twist. 

Sorry, I quoted the wrong person, possibly due to then being on ignore. Someone said "certified translation". 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Neeranam said:

I'm just saying there is no such thing as a certified translation, nothing in a twist. 

Sorry, I quoted the wrong person, possibly due to then being on ignore. Someone said "certified translation". 

 

 

Wrong, there are certified translations and are from a certified translation company and stamped as such.  Additionally the Royal Thai consulates always ask for a certified translation.  The US embassy also certifies the documents one needs for use in obtaining your yellow book here in Thailand as well.

 

https://th.usembassy.gov/u-s-citizen-services/local-resources-of-u-s-citizens/notaries-public/certified-true-copies-of-u-s-passport/

 

https://thaiconsulatela.org/en/services-for-thais/legalization/certified-translations/

 

https://www.uslanguageservices.com/thai-translation-services/

 

image.png

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, ThailandRyan said:

Wrong, there are certified translations and are from a certified translation company and stamped as such.  Additionally the Royal Thai consulates always ask for a certified translation.  The US embassy also certifies the documents one needs for use in obtaining your yellow book here in Thailand as well.

 

https://th.usembassy.gov/u-s-citizen-services/local-resources-of-u-s-citizens/notaries-public/certified-true-copies-of-u-s-passport/

 

https://thaiconsulatela.org/en/services-for-thais/legalization/certified-translations/

 

https://www.uslanguageservices.com/thai-translation-services/

 

image.png

There is no certifying body for translation or translation companies in Thailand. Trust me, I work as a translator(not certified obv 😉 ). 

A stamp means nothing, anyone can make their own stamp and translate things for official use, I've done so. 

A company can be registered, which looks better, but. 

The links you provide are in the USA. 

 

 

 

Edited by Neeranam
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Neeranam said:

I'm just saying there is no such thing as a certified translation, nothing in a twist. 

Sorry, I quoted the wrong person, possibly due to then being on ignore. Someone said "certified translation".

Probably because the translator must stamp the document as "Certified Correct Translation" with a name and telephone number. Only the translation is certified, not the content.

Documents are normally unacceptable without the stamp, they don't want your GF doing the translation.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, jaiyenyen said:

To be clear.

The translations of those documents is for your Yellow book. Once you have the Yellow book, it's a simple process to get the Pink card. I got both of mine at the same time, just a different counter.

Also, I believe the reason for the translation is just to get your name translated into Thai. If you're married to a Thai the amphur or khet might accept your marriage certificate as proof of translation, mine did.

You might also be asked for a translation of your parent's names. I got one of the girls in the office to do the translation for me (Not official) and it was accepted.

Each amphur or khet will have their own set of rules.

Quite. I never had to provide any translations when I did my yellow book.

Had to have a police check which meant it took 6 weeks to get the book.

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Neeranam said:

Actually, it's "Non-Thai pink card". Some are in English.

image.png.12d3b928e8a9751aba2a6da7cbd60cd1.png

I think a little more info needs to be added, there are , except the one above for migrant workers, 2 different pink ID cards; 1 starts with digit 6 for people with yellow hose book, as where the second one starts with digit 8 for PR.....Refer to attachment.

Th Farang ID Card Nrs.pdf

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, sandyf said:

Probably because the translator must stamp the document as "Certified Correct Translation" with a name and telephone number. Only the translation is certified, not the content.

Documents are normally unacceptable without the stamp, they don't want your GF doing the translation.

No, all the translator does is add name and phone number(no stamp needed). There is no Certifying body for translators in Thailand. A stamp means absolutely nothing, your girlfriend could do it.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Neeranam said:

There is no certifying body for translation or translation companies in Thailand. Trust me, I work as a translator(not certified obv 😉 ). 

A stamp means nothing, anyone can make their own stamp and translate things for official use, I've done so. 

A company can be registered, which looks better, but. 

The links you provide are in the USA. 

 

 

 

This is slightly wrong.... The only officially recognized Legalization can be done at MFA, Laksi...... 

  • Like 1
  • Confused 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, jomtienisgood said:

I think a little more info needs to be added, there are , except the one above for migrant workers, 2 different pink ID cards; 1 starts with digit 6 for people with yellow hose book, as where the second one starts with digit 8 for PR.....Refer to attachment.

Th Farang ID Card Nrs.pdf 256.03 kB · 0 downloads

Where is that download from? Pink cards can't start with 1,2,3,4,5,7.

 

6 is for foreign workers and refugees, 0 is for registered migrants. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, jomtienisgood said:

This is slightly wrong.... The only officially recognized Legalization can be done at MFA, Laksi...... 

I never mentioned legalization.

 

Translations can be certified by the Thai Consulate in the UK, but not in Thailand. 

Edited by Neeranam
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Sheryl said:

 

The first part of this (translation)  is standard. And most Ampurs do require that it by translated officially by the MoFA. A few only let you use a private translation service.

 

The second part makes no sense, since a passport is already officially issued by your government. You will find that the MoFA does nto require anything from your Embassy to do the translation.

 

 

Unforrtunatly, the embassy part is part of the process nowadays, probably too many kaosan road fake passports.

I did a passport translation a couple of years ago and needed a letter from my embassy saying "yes, this is a real passport"

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Neeranam said:

Where is that download from? Pink cards can't start with 1,2,3,4,5,7.

 

6 is for foreign workers and refugees, 0 is for registered migrants. 

That's what it says in attachment...... 

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Neeranam said:

No, all the translator does is add name and phone number(no stamp needed). There is no Certifying body for translators in Thailand. A stamp means absolutely nothing, your girlfriend could do it.

 

You are wrong but here in Thailand you will always find an exception.

I needed a translation for first marriage extension, my wife did it and put her company stamp on it. They rung her up and said they would only accept documents from a recognised translator. No translators around here had to go to Pattaya, right pain.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 3/6/2021 at 9:57 AM, arick said:

It's not worth it. Just use your driving licence. 

Or just use your passport..... 

Last week I opened a joint bank account with wife at local branch Bangkok Bank. 

Had to sign photocopies of PP ID page and latest extension stamp........ 

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, sandyf said:

You are wrong but here in Thailand you will always find an exception.

I needed a translation for first marriage extension, my wife did it and put her company stamp on it. They rung her up and said they would only accept documents from a recognised translator. No translators around here had to go to Pattaya, right pain.

Many translators do it by mail, could have saved you a trip. My point was they are not certified, just recognized 😉 or registered. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, JAS21 said:

it is so simple to obtain

Is it though?

 

I believe you need a yellow book first. Is this easy to obtain? What are the requirements? That is an impossible question. Many districts have different rules.

 

As an example, my local district want the passport translation to be certified by MFA in Bangkok. That is a hassle in itself. For what? To avoid the need to get a residency cert for a DL every 5 years?

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Neeranam said:

Is that law ever enforced, I've never known anyone to carry their passport in all my nearly 30 years here? 

I've never been randomly asked for mine. 

 

I don't even know if it is a law requiring one to carry their passport at all times in Thailand.   I suspect not - but I don't know.

 

I do note that most tourist sites, that give recommendations to tourists coming to Thailand, very strongly recommend they carry their passports with them mostly at all times in Thailand.

 

But more important, over my years either in Thailand, or when I was tracking Thai news from afar , I have read accounts where during a bar raid by police (for what ever reason) the foreigners without passports were separated from those with passports. Those with passports were allowed to go home, those without, marched to the police station (and later allowed to go home, with a requirement to return later with their passports).  Clearly those who had their passports with them, were less inconvenienced. 

 

Would a pink-ID suffice in a bar raid?  I don't know. My guess is after police copied details from the pink-ID, one would then be allowed to go home (not marched to police station) but required to return to police station later with one's passport.  But that's my guess. It could be 100% wrong in some cases, and right in other cases. I doubt there is much consistency - it may depend on various factors.

 

Further, I have read conflicting accounts of statements of Thai police officials, where some at one time said in public that passports were required to be carried, and some at other times, other officials said passports not required (but rather in lieu of passport a copy of passport adequate).

 

After learning my lesson in 1997-to-1999 (where my passport became very degraded due to dimensions (not due to its weight which someone on this forum thinks), in subsequent years in Thailand I carried a laminated copy of my passport with me, and locked my passport up in my hotel room (and later my condo) in a safe.  However the laminated copy degraded with time as its dimensions were awkward. I then tried creating a smaller laminated version of my passport, but then it was hard to see/read (and rejected on few occasions I had to show such).   Further due to degradation of the laminated full sized version, less than every 6-months I had to create a new laminated version. It was inconvenient.

 

As to whether this Thai pink-ID (which is NOT an ID) will suffice in a bar if police raid the bar, I honestly don't know.   I no longer go to bars, so I am unlikely to find out. 

 

I do know obtaining the pink-ID was relatively quick (noting I already had all the pre-requisite documents/translations from getting my marriage registered in Thailand and also having my Yellow Book for a condo I own) ... that the pink-ID has saved me time overall.    It has on occasion allowed me to be spontaneous (like when my wife and I checking into a hotel on the spur of the moment, instead of driving another hour to get back home (where my passport was located)). The hotel accepted the pink-ID for me.

 

I suspect not everyone will experience the same as me.    

 

Fortunately there is NO requirement for retired expatriates to have such a pink-ID - and that other documents can be used in lieu, albeit without the spontaneity (in my experience) and without the time saving (in my experience). 

Edited by oldcpu
  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
46 minutes ago, youreavinalaff said:

I believe you need a yellow book first. Is this easy to obtain? What are the requirements? That is an impossible question. Many districts have different rules.

 

If it were me - i would not get a pink-ID if I did not already have a Yellow Book.  Getting my Yellow Book took some time.  

 

I don't recall translations of my passport being needed for my pink-ID, but maybe it was. I already had such translations as that was a requirement to register my marriage in Thailand (where I note registering my marriage in Thailand was a requirement as part of an effort to obtain a permission to stay in Thailand based on marriage).  Registering my marriage in Thailand was not so easy.

 

My view is everyone is different here. 

 

The pink-ID may save some time and give convenience (for one who already has prerequisite paperwork), and for others the complete opposite and be difficult.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Neeranam said:

I never mentioned legalization.

 

Translations can be certified by the Thai Consulate in the UK, but not in Thailand. 

correct ,i did mine while on holiday over there , also as we were married in the UK  previously i had to get my marriage certificate authenticated ,sent it to Milton Keynes ,they did it ,all in all took a few weeks while i was on holiday in the UK.

Edited by ivor bigun
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...