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Village why loud music everyday 06:00 am


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Read the title and just laughed.......move out of our Thai village in Isan because of the constant, deafening noise, five day weddings, five day funerals, temple loudspeaker, Village boss loudspeaker,

you come Thailand ... embrace culture!!  now complain???   i like night music same bass......five hours, very loud.... boom, boom, boom....   they are drinking and having fun, why

I'm surprised that anyone knows the 'sound of concentration camps'

34 minutes ago, Pilotman said:

I don't live in a village. I'm also socially considerate of others, a gene that is clearly switched off in so many Thais .

You don't live in a village but can give an account of what happens and why.

 

You are wasted on Thai Visa. 🤣🤣🤣🤣

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On 3/28/2021 at 7:46 AM, Ventenio said:

you come Thailand ... embrace culture!!  now complain???

 

i like night music same bass......five hours, very loud.... boom, boom, boom....

 

they are drinking and having fun, why be upset?

 

you want quiet?  in home country it expensive but very quiet

 

so i say i want not same, not same....  boom, boom, boom.. not same

 

100000000000000 dogs even better not same

 

roosters the best.  and cats.  and everything

 

29e32631-a2e8-4f30-9457-5b5657839ba2_tex

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2 hours ago, mfd101 said:

Noone above has mentioned the obvious reason for loudspeakers & announcements in the villages of Thailand: Most of the population are illiterate or at best semi-literate so putting leaflets in letterboxes (as would happen in The West) would be a complete waste of effort, and just another source of rubbish.

 

Haha, maybe I'm semi-literate as I recollect leaflets placed in my mailbox in the West were quickly tossed in the recycle bin without a second glance.

 

The compact nature of Thai villages and with all villages having a puu yai bahn and other elected or appointed officials living there makes the use of a PA system very efficient for getting information out to the public. 5-6AM they have a large captive audience, just about everyone. Maybe 5 baht spent on electricity compared to how much to print and send leaflets out to every house.

 

2 hours ago, mfd101 said:

 I actually enjoy the romantic Isaan songs they play at 0600:

And here I was thinking I was the only one. Cheers

Edited by KeeTua
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I can only speak for our village but best I can determine the village honcho is saying get your lazy asses up and go to work.  And anything you have extra give it to some one who needs it.   

 

Every single day.....

 

 

 

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On 3/28/2021 at 3:08 PM, fishtank said:

Don't forget the banging and grinding all day long.

Why cut tiles quietly when you can use the noisy method.

Thais do love their noise.

They would be lost without it.

Sat by the pool yesterday.....Thai family of four arrive......it is spa pool....no food/drink/music/shouting etc......set up next to us......bluetooth speaker out, phones onto loudspeaker, drinks, food........then start to shout to each other from one end of the pool to the other......my Thai wife pointed out to them no noise.......they got very angry...said they weren't making any noise.....and anyway they paid rent to live here and would make as much noise as they wanted.............How can people be so selfish????

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Another reason why so early is the message has to go out before everybody in the village hits the fields for the days work. Similarly the 6 PM evening ones as by then they have returned. With typical forward planning there are many announcements of a village meeting ............ 8 Am today!

 

Just think yourself lucky you don't work in a pork shop, we have three here that open between 4 and 5 AM (open so early for the same reason). I was astonished the first time I saw this one time i was up early for travelling. Fortunately not too close.

 

Funnilly enough I have gotten used to sleeping around 9 PM and so waking up at 6 is still a good 9 hours sleep. Just synchronize with your hosts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, youreavinalaff said:

So wide of the mark. 

 

I'm not sure where you get your information but, if I were you, I would change my sources.

You obviously haven't visited my home village (ie my b/f's) in Phanom Dong Rak. Even the few teenagers still going to school are close to illiterate. The notion of reading a book is unknown, including - as far as I can tell when visiting their houses - to the school teachers.

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1 hour ago, mfd101 said:

You obviously haven't visited my home village (ie my b/f's) in Phanom Dong Rak. Even the few teenagers still going to school are close to illiterate. The notion of reading a book is unknown, including - as far as I can tell when visiting their houses - to the school teachers.

I'm not sure if not being drawn to reading books makes one illiterate.

 

The same people you refer too are more than often glued to social media on their phones. I'm only guessing but I would imagine that reading would be involved.

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14 minutes ago, youreavinalaff said:

"lol" would be in response to a comment. Are the comments not being read? One does not have to acquire knowledge whilst reading to be deemed literate. Plenty of fiction out there.

 

The original comment that I replied to said "Most" when referring to Thai people who cannot read. Are you agreeing with that? I was a teacher in Thailand for 21 years. I probably came across a dozen students who could not read and they had learning difficulties. So, out of 50000+ students that I met only a miniscule number of them could not read. Hardly most, is it?

So where were you teaching? Amongst the Khmer peasants of south Surin?

 

My original message to which you responded did say "in the villages ... ".

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49 minutes ago, youreavinalaff said:

"Peasants" you say. That word alone speaks volumes about your disdain for the local people.

 

Actually, I have taught in schools in Surin. One where the students spoke Khmer as one of their languages and one where they spoke Laos. 99% were also fluent in both reading and speaking Thai.

 

 

 

May be a little pedantic but the Khmer speak the Khamin language, Khmer are the people

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4 minutes ago, clivebaxter said:

 

May be a little pedantic but the Khmer speak the Khamin language, Khmer are the people

Actually, it is all in the accent. The people and the language are the same word.

 

Often you will here words like "Khamin" or "Khmern". Basically down to the Thai language not having the "R" sound at the end of words but pronouncing it as "N".

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21 minutes ago, youreavinalaff said:

Actually, it is all in the accent. The people and the language are the same word.

 

Often you will here words like "Khamin" or "Khmern". Basically down to the Thai language not having the "R" sound at the end of words but pronouncing it as "N".

 

The Mrs is Khmer and she is always correcting me that her language is Khamin. It's a pity they don't teach it in schools as it seems to be dying out among the younger ones.

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7 minutes ago, clivebaxter said:

 

The Mrs is Khmer and she is always correcting me that her language is Khamin. It's a pity they don't teach it in schools as it seems to be dying out among the younger ones.

We'll have to agree to disagree. My wife and her family are Khmer. 

 

Having just ask them, every answer has been Khmer and Khmer. That is when I am asking them to speak it clearly. In conversations between them there is a hint of the "n" sound at the end of the word. However, that is spoken as both the heritage and language. They are both the same word.

 

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8 hours ago, youreavinalaff said:

We'll have to agree to disagree. My wife and her family are Khmer. 

 

Having just ask them, every answer has been Khmer and Khmer. That is when I am asking them to speak it clearly. In conversations between them there is a hint of the "n" sound at the end of the word. However, that is spoken as both the heritage and language. They are both the same word.

 

Enlightening from both sides, however somewhat away from the original post in this thread.

 

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10 minutes ago, cooked said:

Try living in a village where they talk Lao, the younger people that have left are the ones that talk and read Thai. 

My wife learnt better English than she ever did Thai, I think my Thai reading level is nearly up to hers.

Official information will be in Thai, no point in putting up a notice board if nobody can read it.

APART from that: we go to bed at 9pm, wake at 5am, feed chickens etc and get the kids ready for school. If you don't recognise what living in a Thai village means (this isn't Sussex) then don't complain when you find out. 

Good point.....I found out the hard way......now living and relaxing in the middle of a serenely quiet Bangkok.....each to his own I guess.

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2 hours ago, cooked said:

Try living in a village where they talk Lao, the younger people that have left are the ones that talk and read Thai. 

My wife learnt better English than she ever did Thai, I think my Thai reading level is nearly up to hers.

Official information will be in Thai, no point in putting up a notice board if nobody can read it.

APART from that: we go to bed at 9pm, wake at 5am, feed chickens etc and get the kids ready for school. If you don't recognise what living in a Thai village means (this isn't Sussex) then don't complain when you find out. 

If you would care to read my previous posts you will see that I have 21 years experience of living in Issan villages.

 

The people that I have met, the students that I have taught, the neighbours and family that I have lived amongst have had a very good knowledge of Thai. Both written and spoken.

 

I fully understand that you have an issue with me. I know you outed me and this username to a member of another forum.

 

Don't let your personal disdain remove you from reality. On person not reading Thai well or one village where literacy may be below average does not constitute " most" of the village population and certainly does not support a comment that "nobody can read it"

 

I am more than happy to direct you to a hundred or more villages local to you, both Khmer and Lao in heritage, where you can go and experience the residents reading and speaking Thai for yourself.

Edited by youreavinalaff
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I should probably get out more but I had no idea this sort of thing happened in Thai villages. Sounds like rural China in Mao's time. Personally I wouldn't be able to stand it and if it happened to me I would take it as a sure sign that I didn't really ought to be living in that particular place.

I can only suggest you find the person responsible for the speakers and pay them enough to switch off those nearest to you.

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On 3/28/2021 at 1:08 PM, youreavinalaff said:

Generally speaking, the 6 am speakers will be broadcasting the provincial radio channel. 

 

You will get some music and some speaking.

 

As mentioned before, if it is just for a few days it is likely the PuYaiBaan making an announcement about a local or village ceremony that is happening soon.

 

Why not learn to speak Thai? You may learn something.

Your first sentence to learn is 'TURN THAT F..ING MUSIC DOWN.....please!

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