Jump to content

Why can't the Embassy vaccinate British people in Thailand?


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 165
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

There has been a lot of discussions in various threads on the forum about this question. The reason the Embassy cannot provide vaccines for British people in Thailand is as follows: As users of the fo

Those working for the FCO and British Chamber of commerce fall under British residential status, continue to pay Tax in the UK and remain under the umbrella of the the NHS.    You’ll have to

It's about reciprocity. All Thais in the UK, even illegals or those with no right of abode are getting vaccinated for free, without prejudice or scrutiny from immigration. This is in stark contrast to

1 hour ago, richard_smith237 said:

 

Those working for the FCO and British Chamber of commerce fall under British residential status, continue to pay Tax in the UK and remain under the umbrella of the the NHS. 

 

You’ll have to look harder for your criticism. 

 

 

With all the debate about whether or not foreigners receive the vaccine, who do you think is in the background lobbying the Thai Government to prevent them from the clumsily abhorrent potential of levying elevated charges on foreigners to receive the vaccine in Thailand etc ???

 

We have very little idea of what occurs behind the scenes but I trust that we have representatives doing their diplomatic best to ensure fair treatment. 

 

Equally so, do you really think it feasible for the British Government to bring in 200,000 doses of vaccine to ensure the safety of its citizens while Thai’s are still struggling to secure sufficient vaccine.

.....Then you would have all the British whingers who live in the provinces complaining because the British Government didn’t arrange to have the vaccine transported to them in the countryside..... And then we’d have all those British whingers complaining because they haven’t been offered the vaccine they wanted.....

 

Ultimately, its not the British Government (Embassy’s) responsibility to provide us healthcare, but they can lobby and ensure that we are not excluded from options made available to Thai’s....

 

I don’t know why any of us would expect more than this... some just have an inflated sense of entitlement. 

 

 

 

 

Under ordinary circumstances, I would agree that the Embassy is not the place for health care. If there were a transparent, rational plan through local means for vaccinating British citizens, there would be no need to consider extraordinary measures. Using the J&J vaccine, single jab, would make sense in this case. This would at least make it practical for those who can get to British premises somewhere in Thailand.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, richard_smith237 said:

And it still isn’t. 

 

There is a plan in place, the same plan that’s in place for the Thai population. 

Why should we British Nationals in Thailand receive a vaccine ahead of the Thai population we live amongst?

 

 

OK, how would you get it here ?

How would you get the licence to import medication ?

How would you store 55,000 doses ? 

How would you distribute them ?

Has the J&J vaccine been approved for use yet? has it been approved for use in Thailand ?

 

 

Are you proposing that 55,000 people ascend on the British Embassy for a vaccine ?

 

For arguments sake: Say 1 person is vaccinated every minute ‘on British Premises) - 60 per hour (8hr day), 480 per day, 2400 per week

It would take 6 months to vaccinate the British Population in Thailand (and thats for one dose).

 

Then we would have people arguing about which type of vaccine... Moderna, Pfiezer, AZ ?

 

Would family of British Citizens also be vaccinated? welcome to another can of worms.... 

 

 

 

The reality is even if the legal complexities could be dealt with, the British Embassy is unable to handle the logistics of vaccinating British Citizens in Thailand, the undertaking is too large to be practical or even safe.

 

Thailand is already well placed to start vaccination and is doing so from next month, I can’t see how the British Embassy cannot improve on that time scale. Perhaps they could have if vaccinations started back in January, but what of every other foreign Mission in other nations? An estimated 5.5 million British people live overseas, how can they all be vaccinated by the British Government?

 

The only realistic thing the British Embassy can do is to ensure that its citizens are included in any vaccination plans the Thai Government make. 

 

 

The issue with these criticisms is that judgement is often passed without thought. So....  I would ask people like you placnx, How would you do it ???

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You certainly put out an avalanche of questions.

 

First of all, not all 55K Brits are so much in need. Let's consider those most at risk, older people. Although there are clotting issues similar to AZ, the cases involved women aged 18-48, so not the target group. The question remains when the J&J vaccine will be approved in the UK. That would be a sensible criterion. This vaccine is easier to transport in-country as well, and requires a single dose.

 

There are various British facilities in Thailand besides the Embassy, so perhaps the vaccination effort could be disseminated, possibly needing some indulgence from Thai authorities. You many need some doctors and nurses to help. Is that really a problem?

 

Importing vaccine: If it comes in by a diplomatic shipment, do we really need the medicine to obtain local approval? 

 

While it is to be hoped that the Thai government can do the bidding of the British legation, considering all of the recent contradictory statements, doesn't it behoove the British government to have a backup plan? At some point, it may simply be unacceptable to remonstrate ad infinitum.

 

If the British head of household can get vaccinated this way, non-British family members can hopefully qualify for vaccination under the local scheme. Main point is that the virus is not going to wait around for the Thai government to make up its mind.

 

I certainly hope that the Embassy in New Delhi finds a way to assist British citizens there. 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, placnx said:

You certainly put out an avalanche of questions.

Questions that are necessary don’t you think ??? - so that we don’t make blind sweeping statements such as ’The Embassy should vaccinate us’ !

 

Quote

First of all, not all 55K Brits are so much in need. Let's consider those most at risk, older people. Although there are clotting issues similar to AZ, the cases involved women aged 18-48, so not the target group. The question remains when the J&J vaccine will be approved in the UK. That would be a sensible criterion. This vaccine is easier to transport in-country as well, and requires a single dose.

Differentiate just by age, what about other risk groups? Who makes the decision and based on what criteria? who is qualified to go through the 100’s or 1000’s of applications with medical proof of risk criteria ?

 

Quote

There are various British facilities in Thailand besides the Embassy, so perhaps the vaccination effort could be disseminated,

What are the other properties considered ‘British Soil’ ??? 

 

Quote

possibly needing some indulgence from Thai authorities. You many need some doctors and nurses to help. Is that really a problem?

To take them away from the Thai hospitals administering the vaccines ??? Those same doctors and nurses could be better utilised vaccinating those in area’s of high population density, the slums etc, key worker, teachers etc.... 

 

Quote

Importing vaccine: If it comes in by a diplomatic shipment, do we really need the medicine to obtain local approval? 

Do items brought in diplomatically not then need to remain on sovereign soil or at least not be distributed amongst the public domain ? Any legal implications to distributing it to other areas around Thailand, i.e. British Club, British Consul offices etc ?

 

Quote

While it is to be hoped that the Thai government can do the bidding of the British legation, considering all of the recent contradictory statements, doesn't it behoove the British government to have a backup plan? At some point, it may simply be unacceptable to remonstrate ad infinitum.

Do the Thai people have a back up plan? we have chosen to live in Thailand. 

People who are so desperate for their vaccine could go home. The backup plan is to ensure Thailand is fully supported in securing the vaccines and distributing them without prejudice. 

 

Quote

If the British head of household can get vaccinated this way, non-British family members can hopefully qualify for vaccination under the local scheme. Main point is that the virus is not going to wait around for the Thai government to make up its mind.

I fully expect that I can get vaccinated at the same time of within a very close time frame as my Wife. 

We may opt not to take Sinovac if we can buy Moderna or Pfizer, or AZ - (just for the simple reason that the ability to travel may be impacted for those who’ve taken Sinovac - yet to be conformed of course).

 

IF I were to obtain the vaccine through ‘British Channels’ (i.e. Embassy) I would fully expect my Wife to be afforded the same privilege. I would be upset if the Biritsh Government did not honour the equal status of a foreign spouse.

 

Quote

I certainly hope that the Embassy in New Delhi finds a way to assist British citizens there. 

 

Repatriation flights.

 

 

Edited by richard_smith237
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

You should direct your question to Mr A.B.Johnson of downing Street London.He sold of what was left of the British Embassy in Bangkok,I believe they are now in two rooms and a broom cupboard in a cookie cutter office block off wireless road.

  • Haha 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted (edited)
9 hours ago, adammike said:

You should direct your question to Mr A.B.Johnson of downing Street London.He sold of what was left of the British Embassy in Bangkok,I believe they are now in two rooms and a broom cupboard in a cookie cutter office block off wireless road.

Global Britain........he needs the money for his two airplanes and his yacht (plus new wallpaper)

Edited by Surelynot
Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Brierley said:

"Re your diverse concerns about legalities, availabilities of medical staff, to get to a practical solution nitpicking is hardly the way to go about it".

 

Neither is insulting the intelligence of Embassy staff, per your opening statement, just because YOU don't get it.

Re "insulting", no need to lose face. I can't joke a bit about the rather hysterical reaction to my fairly brief initial suggestion on how to have a backup plan?

 

The Embassy would obviously have to get technical help and instructions from London, so this is not a problem easily solved. 

 

As for "nitpicking", in Thailand there are many laws, but people are practical in solving problems created by conflicting edicts. So thinking positively is useful in getting past obstacles.

  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

An inflammatory post and reply have been removed

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, billd766 said:

But many of us British expats ALSO pay tax in the UK but still get nothing in return from the UK government. Many still have homes in the UK also and taxes are paid on those too.

I just finished filing my self assessment and had the option to declare myself non-resident for the year. I decided instead to file as though I was UK resident, which I would have been, were it not for the virus. This resulted in me paying tax, big deal, I benefit sufficiently already from having a home there, having access to NHS, receiving my pension and having a UK passport. I don't feel the need to account for every Pound I spend in tax and then demand something in return. If I can't hand over 500 quid in tax to my government for the privilege of it all, there's something not quite right.

  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

So if as you state it can not provide healthcare to British people outside of the UK pethaps you could explain why almost all the British people at the Embassy were vaccinated whilst here in Thailand ? Further why is it  that foreigners  ie supporting staff at the Bangkok Embassy who were not British were also vaccinated at the UKs taxpayers expense ?

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, placnx said:

Embassies should base their response on reality. The NHS excuse is truly regrettable. Will Consular team affirm that they have not been vaccinated, being out of the NHS sphere of influence?

Of course they will not as they have all been vaccinated. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Easiest solution is to have the various countries including the UK make arrangements with the drug companies to supply vaccines to hospital and other accredited health facilities and let the expatriates go there and pay for the vaccine.  Assuming Johnson & Johnson is approved and effective for all age groups for just over 300 thb you could get inoculated.  Traveling to an embassy or other government facility to get a "free" vaccine will cost you a lot more than traveling to a local health facility.  

Infographic: The Cost Per Jab Of Covid-19 Vaccine Candidates | Statista 
 

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Excel said:

So if as you state it can not provide healthcare to British people outside of the UK pethaps you could explain why almost all the British people at the Embassy were vaccinated whilst here in Thailand ? Further why is it  that foreigners  ie supporting staff at the Bangkok Embassy who were not British were also vaccinated at the UKs taxpayers expense ?

 

Answer is obvious.... 

 

They are still working for the British Government, continue to fall under the NHS umbrella and continue to pay British Taxes. 

 

Non-British staff at the Embassy and British Chamber of commerce are also working for the British Government.

 

It would be highly irregular to vaccinate only the British nationals... Imagine the optics of not vaccinating Thai staff when all others are vaccinated. Additionally, it would highly the stupidity of not vaccinating everyone in the work place so the work place is better protected. 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 2
  • Sad 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Thomas J said:

Easiest solution is to have the various countries including the UK make arrangements with the drug companies to supply vaccines to hospital and other accredited health facilities and let the expatriates go there and pay for the vaccine.  Assuming Johnson & Johnson is approved and effective for all age groups for just over 300 thb you could get inoculated.  Traveling to an embassy or other government facility to get a "free" vaccine will cost you a lot more than traveling to a local health facility.  

 

Agreed.... 

 

The best thing the British Embassy (and all other Embassies) can do is to lobby the Thai government for a faster approval process to approve the other vaccines which have not yet been approved (only AZ, Sinvac, Janssen have been approved in Thailand so far). 

 

Then ensure all foreign national have equal access to the vaccines at their local healthcare facility. 

 

Embassies can also assist in expediting export / import of the vaccines to speed up the process on a national level for Thailand.

 

 

 

Undertaking individual efforts to import a vaccines to each individual nationality will quite likely achieve a slower availability of the vaccine to many individuals. 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
52 minutes ago, richard_smith237 said:

Undertaking individual efforts to import a vaccines to each individual nationality will quite likely achieve a slower availability of the vaccine to many individuals

One thing is for sure, you have the best and the brightest minds of all the governments around the world.  They will certainly marshal all the experts to contact the various governments, vaccine companies, logistic companies, and health care facilities.  They will present a list of expedited practices and write papers weighing the pro's and con's of each.  After careful deliberation they will reach a consensus on the more effective and efficient way to make those vaccines available.  However, that practice will not be actually put into place until they have tried every other conceivable alternative no matter how foolhardy it appeared upon first examination. 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...