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Tiles for Swimming Pool


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“Pool tile has been been specially manufactured to stand up to sunlight, changing temperatures, an aquatic environment, and constant contact with the chemicals in swimming pool water. Regular household tile such as bathroom and kitchen tile isn't designed for outdoor use and may not offer the same durability.” 
We got stone tiles for our pool from https://www.hinsaengnakorn.co.th

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Proper pool tiles actually have the glaze come of the edges so as the water doesn't get under!

I have retiled a pool that was tiled with substandard hand cut tiles and the water & iron content in the water had gotten under the glaze within 1 yr. (I easily get rid of the iron content on water now)!

My company has built & renovated pools all over Thailand for 17 yrs.

We prefer PebbleCrete finish now!

PM me for more details

 

Cheers 

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44 minutes ago, Bagwain said:

Proper pool tiles actually have the glaze come of the edges so as the water doesn't get under!

I have retiled a pool that was tiled with substandard hand cut tiles and the water & iron content in the water had gotten under the glaze within 1 yr. (I easily get rid of the iron content on water now)!

My company has built & renovated pools all over Thailand for 17 yrs.

We prefer PebbleCrete finish now!

PM me for more details

 

Cheers 

I meant to say the glaze comes over the edges!

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  • 2 weeks later...

I built my pool 15 years ago with cheapest tiles laid with a cheapest cement, there is no deterioration visible, nor any problem. If some speak about re-tiling because of breakage, drops of tiles, it's mostly caused by wrong laying, insufficient grouting, very often at the mosaic tiles. The workers are keen on promised money, so the last touch of the grouting is not so perfect.

 

Besides, lowering of pH - as it is always advised - contributes not only to a higher cost but to the increased deterioration of the grouting, an acidic water. Of course it is good for a better efficiency of chlorine but beside that it does not help to the water clarity.      

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Posted (edited)
6 hours ago, Saanim said:

I built my pool 15 years ago with cheapest tiles laid with a cheapest cement, there is no deterioration visible, nor any problem. If some speak about re-tiling because of breakage, drops of tiles, it's mostly caused by wrong laying, insufficient grouting, very often at the mosaic tiles. The workers are keen on promised money, so the last touch of the grouting is not so perfect.

 

Besides, lowering of pH - as it is always advised - contributes not only to a higher cost but to the increased deterioration of the grouting, an acidic water. Of course it is good for a better efficiency of chlorine but beside that it does not help to the water clarity.      

Sounds like you are an expert in your own lunch box!

pH should be kept at around 7.2 to 7.6 to avoid black spot & to make chlorine kill more efficient. 

Most native pool cleaners use 90% Tri-Chlor which has a pH of 7.

This will always give you acidic water especially when the cynuric acid builds up.

Soda ash is their preferred pH buffer, however not many know how to use both.

You have been lucky with your pool.

I have renovated many dozens of pools with most having the cheap kitchen tiles used. When they break you have very sharp egdes that can cut deep!

Doesn't pay to generalise!

 

Edited by Bagwain
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52 minutes ago, Bagwain said:

Sounds like you are an expert in your own lunch box!

Not quite understand what is meaning of your statement. 

 

What I described is my long time experience with my swimming pool.  Not having broken tiles and not needing to re-tile - as I am seeing at many pools made by professional companies with special tiles for swimming pools. And having daily clear water with minimum addition of chemicals. 

 

Also having experience with people commenting in forums on others when they write something what they do not want to read.  

 

Yes, I did mention that the lower pH is important for higher efficiency of chlorine. And as many are experiencing the low pH of 90% Tri-Chlor does not help enough.  They have to help with pH Minus (Low). And that's representing quite a lot of the cost with a daily measuring and care. Can be that somebody is getting incoming water with a low pH, especially in heavy rainy season - but that's very unusual.  Normally, the pH is steadily rising. 

 

And since I do not overdo the chlorination - having other (much cheaper) means for fighting the algae - I also do not need to care about the maintaining (mostly lowering) pH that - when acidic - is not really good for the tiles and their grouting. 

 

And I learned that whether the pH is 7 or 8 it does not change anything on the clarity.

 

1 hour ago, Bagwain said:

This will always give you acidic water especially when the cynuric acid builds up.

Actually, the cyanuric acid buildup (when too high chlorination with this kind of inorganic chemicals) is not very good for the pool water.  It does not evaporate like the chlorine. Hence, the rising amount when reaching certain level will disturb the maintaining of the other chemical salad. In this case (of a high level of cyanuric acid - that has to be measured) the experts are advising: exchange at least 50 % of water, the best is all new water...

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On 5/24/2021 at 8:35 PM, Saanim said:

Not quite understand what is meaning of your statement. 

 

What I described is my long time experience with my swimming pool.  Not having broken tiles and not needing to re-tile - as I am seeing at many pools made by professional companies with special tiles for swimming pools. And having daily clear water with minimum addition of chemicals. 

 

Also having experience with people commenting in forums on others when they write something what they do not want to read.  

 

Yes, I did mention that the lower pH is important for higher efficiency of chlorine. And as many are experiencing the low pH of 90% Tri-Chlor does not help enough.  They have to help with pH Minus (Low). And that's representing quite a lot of the cost with a daily measuring and care. Can be that somebody is getting incoming water with a low pH, especially in heavy rainy season - but that's very unusual.  Normally, the pH is steadily rising. 

 

And since I do not overdo the chlorination - having other (much cheaper) means for fighting the algae - I also do not need to care about the maintaining (mostly lowering) pH that - when acidic - is not really good for the tiles and their grouting. 

 

And I learned that whether the pH is 7 or 8 it does not change anything on the clarity.

 

Actually, the cyanuric acid buildup (when too high chlorination with this kind of inorganic chemicals) is not very good for the pool water.  It does not evaporate like the chlorine. Hence, the rising amount when reaching certain level will disturb the maintaining of the other chemical salad. In this case (of a high level of cyanuric acid - that has to be measured) the experts are advising: exchange at least 50 % of water, the best is all new water...

 

 

 

 

 

 

What ever you do for a job or career stick to it.

I appreciate your experience with your pool. However you are giving half baked information on how to maintain a pool based on your experiece alone.

Sorry but all pools have their own personality!

After being involved with over 2000 commercial pools in Aust. NZ, Malayasia & Thailand I sort of know a bit!

Telling people that you can build a pool with the cheapest cement & tiles is ludicrous and just plain wrong!

By the way the experts don't say dump 50% of the water.

This actually comes down to the PPM of the cynuric acid which by the way is in the 90% Tri-Chlor.

Only way is a good quaility salt chlorinator & not a Chinese one!

 

 

Edited by Bagwain
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13 minutes ago, Bagwain said:

After being involved with over 2000 commercial pools in Aust. NZ, Malayasia & Thailand I sort of know a bit!

Telling people that you can build a pool with the cheapest cement & tiles is ludicrous and just plain wrong!

By the way the experts don't say dump 50% of the water.

This actually comes down to the PPM of the cynuric acid which by the way is in the 90% Tri-Chlor.

Only way is a good quaility salt chlorinator & not a Chinese one!

 

 

I do not tell people what they should do, I just was telling what I have and what are the results after years. I do not sell anything.

 

Of course if I will try to sell something I will not tell them buy something cheap when I can sell you something expensive.  

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On 5/24/2021 at 8:35 PM, Saanim said:

Not quite understand what is meaning of your statement. 

 

What I described is my long time experience with my swimming pool.  Not having broken tiles and not needing to re-tile - as I am seeing at many pools made by professional companies with special tiles for swimming pools. And having daily clear water with minimum addition of chemicals. 

 

Also having experience with people commenting in forums on others when they write something what they do not want to read.  

 

Yes, I did mention that the lower pH is important for higher efficiency of chlorine. And as many are experiencing the low pH of 90% Tri-Chlor does not help enough.  They have to help with pH Minus (Low). And that's representing quite a lot of the cost with a daily measuring and care. Can be that somebody is getting incoming water with a low pH, especially in heavy rainy season - but that's very unusual.  Normally, the pH is steadily rising. 

 

And since I do not overdo the chlorination - having other (much cheaper) means for fighting the algae - I also do not need to care about the maintaining (mostly lowering) pH that - when acidic - is not really good for the tiles and their grouting. 

 

And I learned that whether the pH is 7 or 8 it does not change anything on the clarity.

 

Actually, the cyanuric acid buildup (when too high chlorination with this kind of inorganic chemicals) is not very good for the pool water.  It does not evaporate like the chlorine. Hence, the rising amount when reaching certain level will disturb the maintaining of the other chemical salad. In this case (of a high level of cyanuric acid - that has to be measured) the experts are advising: exchange at least 50 % of water, the best is all new water...

 

 

 

 

 

 

First time on this forum I've seen a post that largely mirrors my experience(s), with my current pool, which is lined with 4" ceramic.

Neither building, nor maintaining a salt-water pool is rocket science. But a reasoning of general knowledge is useful.

Designed and built my current pool 5 years ago and have had fewer maintenance issues than a smaller pool at a property we had in Hua Hin.

Had a kind of maintenance contract, whereby I did most of the maintenance and got a routinely worded 'gobbledygook' highlighting what I hadn't achieved and an extra cost to rectify such. Got to a point where I did the stated "expensive' checks before they arrived and mostly we were at variance.

 

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3 hours ago, Bagwain said:

What ever you do for a job or career stick to it.

I appreciate your experience with your pool. However you are giving half baked information on how to maintain a pool based on your experiece alone.

Sorry but all pools have their own personality!

After being involved with over 2000 commercial pools in Aust. NZ, Malayasia & Thailand I sort of know a bit!

Telling people that you can build a pool with the cheapest cement & tiles is ludicrous and just plain wrong!

By the way the experts don't say dump 50% of the water.

This actually comes down to the PPM of the cynuric acid which by the way is in the 90% Tri-Chlor.

Only way is a good quaility salt chlorinator & not a Chinese one!

 

 

Might have had some respect for your chosen profession if you had gone with the "every pool has its own personality" and EXPLAIN WHY to us or had acknowledged the fact that the other poster had built an inexpensive pool which works for 15 years, rather than ranting about your experience and attempting to diminish the experiences of others. Sad.

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11 hours ago, mikebike said:

Might have had some respect for your chosen profession if you had gone with the "every pool has its own personality" and EXPLAIN WHY to us or had acknowledged the fact that the other poster had built an inexpensive pool which works for 15 years, rather than ranting about your experience and attempting to diminish the experiences of others. Sad.

Seems you are doing the ranting!

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12 hours ago, alacrity said:

First time on this forum I've seen a post that largely mirrors my experience(s), with my current pool, which is lined with 4" ceramic.

Neither building, nor maintaining a salt-water pool is rocket science. But a reasoning of general knowledge is useful.

Designed and built my current pool 5 years ago and have had fewer maintenance issues than a smaller pool at a property we had in Hua Hin.

Had a kind of maintenance contract, whereby I did most of the maintenance and got a routinely worded 'gobbledygook' highlighting what I hadn't achieved and an extra cost to rectify such. Got to a point where I did the stated "expensive' checks before they arrived and mostly we were at variance.

 

Yes well said. Basic knowledge is important. However water balance and proper sanitation is a little more involved than mearly throwing cholrine in the pool and keeping the pH in the correct parameters! 

Salt chlorinations is the way to go and also has lower maintenance!

 

Also the type of tile is very important. Most of the pools I have renovated have had kitchen tiles in place that become very dangerous when broken. 1 customers daughter cut her foot & required 10 stiches which promted him to redo his pool with PebbleCrete. Not the only case as well.

 

A lot of pools built 15 + yrs ago most likely didn't have access to quality pool tiles. However some obviously have been done on the cheap by developers cutting costs. 25 yrs in the industry I have seen it all. 

 

 

 

 

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I quite do not understand how somebody can be injured by tiles. If a tile is broken, then it drops away, will be removed and a later repaired if the pool emptied.  Why somebody should trample over a  broken tile? Perhaps the water not clear enough to know it and see it?

 

In my 15 years I had experienced here twice an earthquake, both quite a strong one when by chance I saw a strong wave flowing over the (overflow) edge, no tile (the cheapest kitchen one, bought on sale, laid by village brick layers, first time in their life) has broken.        

 

The problems with tiles I have seen around were mostly with the fashionable small mosaic tiles (built by renowned companies).  Not with the tiles but with the water coming under the tiles, mainly happens within 5 - 10 years.  Then the whole parts are loosen, being removed, then the pool exists with many such naked areas without tiles until it's decided to re-tile it all.

 

I have tiles 40x40cm.  Should I ever make another pool I would take even larger tiles what's available, such a plentiful choice in Thailand. Seeing such floors with granite-like tiles (at clinics, shops) laid with almost zero gap if finding good people who can do that. Comparing the total gap length of such maxi-tiles with the kms of the small tiles gap where the dirt (and algae) is always gathering, being slowly eaten within years by the low pH water.

 

     

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38 minutes ago, Saanim said:

I quite do not understand how somebody can be injured by tiles. If a tile is broken, then it drops away, will be removed and a later repaired if the pool emptied.  Why somebody should trample over a  broken tile? Perhaps the water not clear enough to know it and see it?

 

In my 15 years I had experienced here twice an earthquake, both quite a strong one when by chance I saw a strong wave flowing over the (overflow) edge, no tile (the cheapest kitchen one, bought on sale, laid by village brick layers, first time in their life) has broken.        

 

The problems with tiles I have seen around were mostly with the fashionable small mosaic tiles (built by renowned companies).  Not with the tiles but with the water coming under the tiles, mainly happens within 5 - 10 years.  Then the whole parts are loosen, being removed, then the pool exists with many such naked areas without tiles until it's decided to re-tile it all.

 

I have tiles 40x40cm.  Should I ever make another pool I would take even larger tiles what's available, such a plentiful choice in Thailand. Seeing such floors with granite-like tiles (at clinics, shops) laid with almost zero gap if finding good people who can do that. Comparing the total gap length of such maxi-tiles with the kms of the small tiles gap where the dirt (and algae) is always gathering, being slowly eaten within years by the low pH water.

 

     

There in is you lack of knowledge & experience with swimming pools!

(Apart from your own) I have nothing against you however you should leave it to peolpe who have the knowledge & experiece!

The sad thing is people who are thinking of buying a swimming pool read this tripe & it gives them false hopes and costing!

Leave it to people who are experieced in the tade and know what they are talking about!

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On 5/27/2021 at 8:40 AM, Bagwain said:

Yes well said. Basic knowledge is important. However water balance and proper sanitation is a little more involved than mearly throwing cholrine in the pool and keeping the pH in the correct parameters! 

Salt chlorinations is the way to go and also has lower maintenance!

 

Also the type of tile is very important. Most of the pools I have renovated have had kitchen tiles in place that become very dangerous when broken. 1 customers daughter cut her foot & required 10 stiches which promted him to redo his pool with PebbleCrete. Not the only case as well.

 

A lot of pools built 15 + yrs ago most likely didn't have access to quality pool tiles. However some obviously have been done on the cheap by developers cutting costs. 25 yrs in the industry I have seen it all. 

 

 

 

 

Some take advantage of both a 'perceived' and an 'actual' lack of knowledge though! Our property in Hua Hin was a secondary 'home by the sea' and subsequently we weren't always present. Our experience prejudiced my opinion of 'so called' experts.

 

The problem wasn't really with the pool; which seemed to be structurally intact, but the company contracted to maintain it.

 

Since then I've been maintaining this pool for a while and I've learnt a lot about the seasonal effect of the 'exotic soup' I swim in. A knowledge that does nothing but emphasize my understanding of either; their  incompetence or mal-intent.

 

Structures aside, maintenance  is little more than an understanding of grade 9 chemistry. If a pool has been built/constructed with inferior materials, it's not going to last as long before a costly level of repair is needed. Pool equipment and structural requirements are designed for pools, period.

 

 

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