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Are You 75, Now, and Still in Thailand, after all these years?


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For me the breakfast is my favorite meal, it’s how I wake up, if I haven’t had breakfast I feel as if my day hasn’t stared.

 

Its so easy to focus on what we don’t have.

I’m truly worried about worrying and not seeing what’s happening in front of my eyes, someone said “people are suffering from Future Shock, the future is happening right now in front of our eyes “

I try to tell the children to look around and see whats happening right now, but they give that look of “you don’t understand, you’re too old to understand’

 

By then time we hit 50 we start to see the important things in life, and we realise what we used to worry about isn’t really that important now.

 

How can we pass on this to the younger generation, how can we tell them that posting what you had for dinner to your friends is less important than having dinner with your friends in person?

We should ban smart phones for 2-3 days per week to reconnect with each other

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5 minutes of my life gone. And at my age every one counts, dammit.

My Dearest Friends,   I am writing here, now, simply because, last week, one 75-year-old reader replied to a topic of mine, so thoughtfully and kindly.   I was sincerely touched by

Believe me:   a. You will make it to 75. b. By age 76, you will be looking at 86. c. At age 90, you will be in Chiang Mai, and loving it. d. There is really nowhere else to go

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1 hour ago, Fat is a type of crazy said:

Coincidence. She is now 75.

I am not sure if this post is about being 75, or breakfast, or specifically tea.

I am disappointed in the cost of good muesli in Thailand.

On holiday in Thailand I tend to eat at huge hotel smorgasbords. It's included and sometimes excellent. Not always the smart thing but I just have a small lunch and dinner. 

The best breakfast I had somewhat recently was the hotel in Koh Chang that had the issue where a negative review landed a bloke in jail.  Good bread. Good meals. Good muesli. Outlook over the sea.

I used to drink tea but now I find it heavy. Never drink coffee. 

This post is about:  Enjoying ones breakfast on one's 75th birthday.

 

So very unfortunately, Jack Bruce did not quite make it, but not for lack of trying.

 

Hats off to Jack Bruce.

We should give him an honorary 75th year.

Who does not love this guy!

 

Most of you will live to your 75th year.

Some of you have already surpassed your 85th year.

Fewer of you have surpassed your 100th year.

 

Are there any posters here who are both 100 years old and also able to take their breakfast without resorting to tube feeding?

Good question.

I wish I knew.

 

Anyway, Jack Bruce was amazing at the age of 64.

 

 

Regards.

 

 

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A post all in caps has been removed please see the following extract from the forum rules:

 

Forum Netiquette

 

1. Please do not post in all capital letters, bold, unusual fonts, sizes, colors or use unusually large emoticons. It can be difficult to read.

 

 

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What's the big deal with being 75? One of my friends just celebrated his 83rd birthday here in Pattaya, and he's more interested in his first beer of the day, and what wine to have with his dinner, than he is with breakfast tea! And as for having The Times delivered every day, I get the digital edition delivered to my PC, phone and tablet every day for just £9.99 a month. Printed newspapers are so yesterday and contribute to global warming. I also get the digital editions of The Economist and New Scientist every week, so I've got more than enough to read while the teelac giggles inanely at the lakorn on her phone, lol. Adopt, adapt, survive!

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Dear friend, according to your favoured breakfast take it as a gift to be 75 yo.

I wish you more happy returns of your Birthday despite of your unhealthy breakfast.

Enjoy the time to come in beautiful Thailand.

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11 hours ago, GammaGlobulin said:

My Dearest Friends,

 

I am writing here, now, simply because, last week, one 75-year-old reader replied to a topic of mine, so thoughtfully and kindly.

 

I was sincerely touched by his short comment. No doubt, I can supremely identify with it.

 

Being 75, after living three-quarters of a century, is not for the faint of heart. I thought I might even faint, reading his comment, because his comment reminded me of what the world once was, filled with people of greater respect, and true class, typical of those living before the Great War, and before several other wars.

 

I know that one of my greatest faults, posting here, is to never come to the point, or to, seemingly, rarely come to any point, for that matter, and also to use too many commas, maybe up to about ten, in just one sentence.

You're rambling again..😉

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well at 76 i love toast with a variety of toppings i have ,that plus a cup of green tea. the wife has a mug of hot water with lime and honey ,and whatever she fancies to eat ,mind you she has more than likely run about 5k from getting up until breakfast ,she is a fitness fanatic. we sit at the table then and look at our smartphones and exchange anything funny we see on them .

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I always eat cereal for breakfast. I prefer Wheat Bix, but the local doesn't stock them any more. Cereal is very expensive in Thailand and that is an ongoing serious concern to me. I also enjoy a fresh orange juice.

 

I was going to make a witty comment about the OP's taste in music, but lost interest after a few seconds. Once I saw the play time (very looooong songs) I gave up. I'm surprised a 75 year old would waste such a lot of time listening to these long songs. I never listen to anything longer than 2 minutes. Life is far too short.

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11 hours ago, Damrongsak said:

I don't drink tea, nor eat breakfast or lunch.  But I'm a young buck, only 68 years old.  I do get up in the middle of the night and eat Cheerios cereal and drink milk. Whatever.

Are you sure that you are alive? Doesn't sound like a life to me.

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11 hours ago, GammaGlobulin said:

Lest ye forget. Duane Allman is 75, this year, if not mistaken.

 

Drink more tea, my friends, and be thankful to be alive.

 

Good morning.

 

Hope this tune might wake you up, a bit.

 

 

 

 

 

Duane Allman Died October 29, 1971

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3 hours ago, Guderian said:

What's the big deal with being 75? One of my friends just celebrated his 83rd birthday here in Pattaya, and he's more interested in his first beer of the day, and what wine to have with his dinner, than he is with breakfast tea! And as for having The Times delivered every day, I get the digital edition delivered to my PC, phone and tablet every day for just £9.99 a month. Printed newspapers are so yesterday and contribute to global warming. I also get the digital editions of The Economist and New Scientist every week, so I've got more than enough to read while the teelac giggles inanely at the lakorn on her phone, lol. Adopt, adapt, survive!

How civilised.😏

Is it?

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At age 75 I 'race' down the stairs at 06.00 to let the dogs out.

 

Next thing (even before emptying their poo poo tray) is to make a cup of TEA. I couldn't survive the day without fairly copious amounts of the stuff. Twinings (of course!) - the divine Lady Grey, English Breakfast and Earl Grey - and PG Tips Extra Strong courtesy of M and S in Central Festival CM. Dilmah tea is pretty good and cheap. Lipton's I don't like.

 

On my increasingly frequent visits to BKK Hospital in CM, I pig out on a Ham and Cheese Baguette or a Tuna Ciabatta with a cup of rather mysterious Twinings Lavender tea.

 

My dear old Mum lived to be 92 before the bitter English winter did for her. She drank many cups of tea every day. "You'll always be grateful for a cup of tea" was one of her maxims and she quoted William Cowper, the bard of Olney, on the subject of tea: 'The cup that cheers but not inebriates'. She outlived my only coffee drinking Dad by 11 years.

 

Possibly the best tea I've ever tasted was Twinings 'Prince of Wales' but I never see it these days.

 

Rimping have been doing a Buy One Get one on some Aurora teas - nice.

 

And, surely, 'nahm chah' (or, I guess, a close Indian equivalent from the days of Empire) gives us the English 'a cup of cha'?

Talking of Empire, remember 'Camp Coffee' with its wonderful label? Chicory based, I think. Dad drank it with dollops of Carnation milk that even Thais would boggle at! But when he became very ill and immobile, my brother laced it with a substantial 'kick' of Woods Navy Rum (at 06.00!) which helped Dad through the day. Better than all the tablets, he reckoned!

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3 minutes ago, StreetCowboy said:

Anything goes with Stilton, but everything goes with senna pods.

Local coffee and a dobbie. 

Breakfast. 

Old school.

 

 

Goes with anything. 

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2 minutes ago, zzaa09 said:

Local coffee and a dobbie. 

Breakfast. 

Old school.

 

 

Goes with anything. 

A couple of cups of coffee gets me moving in the morning

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10 hours ago, GammaGlobulin said:

Believe me:

 

a. You will make it to 75.

b. By age 76, you will be looking at 86.

c. At age 90, you will be in Chiang Mai, and loving it.

d. There is really nowhere else to go, once one has lived in heaven on Earth.

e. Believe me.

f. 100 years from now, no one will be living in BKK.  

g. Believe me.

h. Are you old enough to recall the smell of newsprint?

i. I still feel nostalgic about the smell of the NYT, and the weight of it, each and every copy.

j.  Again, I tell you that you will be here in Thailand long after I am reduced to ashes.

 

Note: If you wish to remain a happy person, then please remain in Thailand, rather than to seek greener pastures elsewhere.  There are none.

 

 

Well said.

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13 hours ago, KannikaP said:

Absolute bilge water. Taylor's Extra Strong Yorkshire is the only way.

PG tips for me, you can ring them out and use several times

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2 hours ago, 1FinickyOne said:

some of us are actually here because we like/want to be here and this is our first choice of a place to live. 

Without the unpleasant company of Farang circles and all of it's associations. 

 

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15 hours ago, CharlieH said:

If I make it to 75 ,I seriously doubt  I will be in Thailand.

If you think how much the world has changed in the last few years, the ever shifting uncertainty that is Thai immigration and the political scene etc and the next new "boss" in any given authority it all amounts to a "roll of the dice".

 

I used to drink Tea, and of course we all have different taste, I found the yellow label Tea only just about acceptable in some Hotels whilst travelling.

Nowadays my day starts with a Coffee, and that will be the only coffee of the day usually, unless I pop the local Cafe which does an extremely nice Mocha coffee. Generally thoughout the day its just plain water.

I am not a big eater in the morning and single piece of whole grain toast with my coffee is sufficient .

Newspapers ? well there is a blast from the past ! I used to enjoy the Sunday papers the most,although as a kid hated delivering them,extra sacks because they were so thick with supplements, a particular problem climbing the stairs in the blocks of flats ! All replced nowadays of course bt the digital media.Kind of makes you wonder whats next.

 

I think that old age for many is quite unsettling and uncertain. Things do change rapidly now, time seems to get faster with each passing year. The ever shifting sand and the knowledge that the "home" you once knew and indeed the way of life back there has gone ! wonder if there are many that do worry what will become of them here as they reach, if indeed they do reach, that age of 75.

 

 

 

 

 

QUOTE: "I think that old age for many is quite unsettling and uncertain. Things do change rapidly now, time seems to get faster with each passing year. The ever shifting sand and the knowledge that the "home" you once knew and indeed the way of life back there has gone ! wonder if there are many that do worry what will become of them here as they reach, if indeed they do reach, that age of 75"

--------
Of course us older folks worry sometimes "what's to come"?. But what about the young folks of today. What will the world look like if they get to be 75 years old? It's the youngsters that should worry about the future. Much more than us old geezers.

 

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Have noticed that there is much to be said about breakfast and TEA. Was always interested in the British Tea-Culture. Especially "high Tea" caught my attention. Therefore, there was a time I drank excessive amouts of Tea. Regardless of the amounts of Tea I drank, I never got "high" on Tea, only my visits to the toilet increased dramatically.


As an ignorant continental european I must now ask the Brits: How do you get "high" with high-tea? Please give instructions.

 

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