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Half Thai Kids, do they need passports


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Me, my partner and my children (ages 1.5 and 5 days) are moving to Thailand for approx. 1 year in mid November.

 

My partner is half Thai and will be renewing her Thai passport and obtaining her citizen card prior to departure.

 

I will be entering Thailand on visa exemption and have arranged a Thai language course which will allow me to stay up to a year and slightly beyond on an Ed visa.

 

Is it necessary or beneficial for us to get our boys Thai passports and ID cards? It was our plan to get them but if there is no difference or benefit, is there any point? I've gathered that kids (thai or otherwise) can stay in the country if their parents are on an appropriate visa.

 

Just looking for some advice - if waiting in the UK for Thai ID cards and passports to arrive isn't necessary, we wont do it and will go without.

 

Thanks,


Ryan   

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where were the children born, makes a difference where the 1st passport can be applied for, always best for Thais to travel on a Thai passport, they can enter VE on a non Thai passport, when in Thailand they can obtain a 1 year extension as returning Thais, 1,900thb as are all extensions. have a good trip

Edited by steve187
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They don't "need" Thai passports, as they can enter on their current passport, visa-exempt.  There are no fines or bans for children who overstay, so there isn't really an issue if you only plan to stay for a year.  They will need to leave Thailand on the same passport that they entered on.  

 

But it makes a whole lot of sense to get them Thai passports before you leave if you can!

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5 hours ago, ryan15987532 said:

Is it necessary or beneficial for us to get our boys Thai passports and ID cards?

Thai ID cards are only compulsory from the age of 7. Before that, not needed.

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35 minutes ago, brewsterbudgen said:

They don't "need" Thai passports, as they can enter on their current passport, visa-exempt.  There are no fines or bans for children who overstay, so there isn't really an issue if you only plan to stay for a year. 

I don't suggest children intentionally going on a overstay. It can cause problems doing it since technically they are illegally in the country. Children under the age of 15 are not fined for a overstay but that does not make it legal for them to stay in the country.

There is no reason for a child with Thai nationality to overstay since they can easily get one year extensions of stay.

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25 minutes ago, ubonjoe said:

I don't suggest children intentionally going on a overstay. It can cause problems doing it since technically they are illegally in the country. Children under the age of 15 are not fined for a overstay but that does not make it legal for them to stay in the country.

There is no reason for a child with Thai nationality to overstay since they can easily get one year extensions of stay.

I agree and have always made sure my non-Thai kid stays here legally.  But the OP said he only planned to stay in Thailand for a year and both his kids are under 2.  He doesn't "need" a Thai passport for them but I agree he would be best advised to, unless it's impractical.

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1 hour ago, brewsterbudgen said:

He doesn't "need" a Thai passport for them but I agree he would be best advised to, unless it's impractical.

The hardest part is to obtain ones first passport. Thereafter it's just a case of a renewal. A far easier prosses. So get a Thai passport ASAP.

Edited by IvorBiggun2
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10 minutes ago, IvorBiggun2 said:

The hardest part is to obtain ones first passport. Thereafter it's just a case of a renewal. A far easier prosses. So get a Thai passport ASAP.

I assumed from the OP that the kids already have their first passports, as otherwise they wouldn't be able to travel.

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Getting Thai IDs and passports means your boys could be conscripted when they reach 21. The army picks up their details from their tabian baan (house book) However not having Thai passports means they have to apply for entry visas at your local Thai embassy everytime they enter Thailand.

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35 minutes ago, chilly07 said:

Getting Thai IDs and passports means your boys could be conscripted when they reach 21. The army picks up their details from their tabian baan (house book) However not having Thai passports means they have to apply for entry visas at your local Thai embassy everytime they enter Thailand.

Reading the OP it appears it will be many years before that will need to be considered.

If not living here they could be exempted when they reach the age of 21.

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31 minutes ago, chilly07 said:

Getting Thai IDs and passports means your boys could be conscripted when they reach 21.

What's wrong with being conscripted? Military life ain't that bad. Luckily Thailand isn't at war with anyone. It's only 2 years and may do them the world of good. Best option is volunteer. That way you get a choice of what branch you work in.

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4 hours ago, IvorBiggun2 said:

The hardest part is to obtain ones first passport. Thereafter it's just a case of a renewal. A far easier prosses. So get a Thai passport ASAP.

Having obtained Australian, UK and Thai passports for our daughter when she was born and then renewing them five years later, I can confirm that the Thai passport was by far the easiest and cheapest too obtain.

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My grand daughter was born in the US of a Thai mother (Dual National) and upon investigation her daughter had to have her birth registered at the Thai consulate in LA in order to obtain a Thai birth certificate. Once this was done she traveled to Thailand on a US passport and was issued a Thai passport here in Thailand with no issues. Thai consulate advised to do that as according to then issue of an initial Thai passport at a consulate or embassy is more complicated. Main point must have Thai birth certificate from embassy or consulate in country of birth is imperative,  

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Thanks for all your replies, it's appreciated.

My eldest has his UK passport and youngest will be getting his within the month.

 

It looks like I will have to do some research and some thinking as the point of military service never crossed my mind (my partner only has sisters and has lived in UK since age 5 so wasn't really aware of this) but is definitely a point worth considering - from a quick search I see there is no expectation for someone living overseas to complete the service but the boys will be unable to reside in Thailand between ages 20-30 if they don't wish to do it.

 

Thanks,


Ryan 


Edit - Steve187, kids were born in UK.

One other option I am considering is going out on UK passports (except my partner who will use Thai for visa reason) and getting the kids their Thai passports out there. We basically just want to get out there ASAP and don't want to wait in dreary UK if it's not necessary. 

 

Edited by ryan15987532
reply & additional point
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9 minutes ago, ryan15987532 said:

It looks like I will have to do some research and some thinking as the point of military service never crossed my mind (my partner only has sisters and has lived in UK since age 5 so wasn't really aware of this) but is definitely a point worth considering - from a quick search I see there is no expectation for someone living overseas to complete the service but the boys will be unable to reside in Thailand between ages 20-30 if they don't wish to do it.

As I wrote before it will be many years before they reach the age of 21. Things may well been changed by then (no conscription maybe).

At this time there are ways to avoid conscription. One is to enroll to be  a military cadet while in high school which exempts them from it.

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18 minutes ago, ryan15987532 said:

Thanks for all your replies, it's appreciated.

My eldest has his UK passport and youngest will be getting his within the month.

 

It looks like I will have to do some research and some thinking as the point of military service never crossed my mind (my partner only has sisters and has lived in UK since age 5 so wasn't really aware of this) but is definitely a point worth considering - from a quick search I see there is no expectation for someone living overseas to complete the service but the boys will be unable to reside in Thailand between ages 20-30 if they don't wish to do it.

 

Thanks,


Ryan 


Edit - Steve187, kids were born in UK.

One other option I am considering is going out on UK passports (except my partner who will use Thai for visa reason) and getting the kids their Thai passports out there. We basically just want to get out there ASAP and don't want to wait in dreary UK if it's not necessary. 

 

I believe if they join another military they will be removed from consideration.

 

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2 hours ago, StevieAus said:

Having obtained Australian, UK and Thai passports for our daughter when she was born and then renewing them five years later, I can confirm that the Thai passport was by far the easiest and cheapest too obtain.

I was referring to the fact that the first passport of any nationality is the hardest to obtain. Whereas a renewal is relatively easy to get of any nationality. I have 3 Luk Rung children aged 14 and 12 (twins). All with Thai & British passport.

By the way when asked what nationality one is one declares British. Not UK

Edited by IvorBiggun2
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7 hours ago, IvorBiggun2 said:

What's wrong with being conscripted? Military life ain't that bad. Luckily Thailand isn't at war with anyone. It's only 2 years and may do them the world of good. Best option is volunteer. That way you get a choice of what branch you work in.

Agree .,.. as long as it’s structured it can help a person to prepare for life.. My twin brother couldn’t 

hold down a job anywhere my Father had to terminate him from the job. Came to a post @ 19

 

Dad had to try and help the situation with Tough Love..  Get a job or get out., out he went 

and quickly found out the world out there us not so rosey..... brother joined the military and 

it became a career... and he really like working in medical and made it a career...

 

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, IvorBiggun2 said:

What's wrong with being conscripted? Military life ain't that bad. Luckily Thailand isn't at war with anyone. It's only 2 years and may do them the world of good. Best option is volunteer. That way you get a choice of what branch you work in.

Yes you are right, no problem but the Thai army, no way. I spent 11 years in the army so I'm not against serving but in THailand no way.

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5 hours ago, jmcet said:

My grand daughter was born in the US of a Thai mother (Dual National) and upon investigation her daughter had to have her birth registered at the Thai consulate in LA in order to obtain a Thai birth certificate. Once this was done she traveled to Thailand on a US passport and was issued a Thai passport here in Thailand with no issues. Thai consulate advised to do that as according to then issue of an initial Thai passport at a consulate or embassy is more complicated. Main point must have Thai birth certificate from embassy or consulate in country of birth is imperative,  

Receiving a first Thai passport in Thailand after entering using a foreign passport has sometimes led to complications in the past, though it should not. The immigration record (on entry into Thailand) will show (1) that the passport was issued in Thailand; and (2) that it was not used to leave Thailand. The official will then often want to see the passport used to enter Thailand before, and has been known to declare that the traveller is not really Thai. There have been extreme cases of the official actually tearing up the Thai passport, though this is extreme and very rare. An abundance of caution would lead, if possible, to enter the first time with a Thai passport if you ever want to use a Thai passport in the future.

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11 hours ago, IvorBiggun2 said:

I was referring to the fact that the first passport of any nationality is the hardest to obtain. Whereas a renewal is relatively easy to get of any nationality. I have 3 Luk Rung children aged 14 and 12 (twins). All with Thai & British passport.

By the way when asked what nationality one is one declares British. Not UK

I am aware you did and I referred to that in my opening paragraph.

I am also aware that the correct terminology is British but for the purpose of this thread I am sure readers understand.

Must be feeling pedantic ?

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11 hours ago, IvorBiggun2 said:

When it comes to my nationality then yes I am.

Sorry to disappoint you but as my father was born in the UK I also hold British citizenship and passport but always use my Australian passport.

On the subject of the correct definition if you look at HM Passport office website they refer to UK passports.

Perhaps you should raise the issue and post their response.

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My luk krung kids were born in the US.  We registered their births with a Thai consulate and they issued a Thai birth certificate.  Then we applied for Thai passports which they received in about three weeks time.  It was much easier doing it in the US then in Thailand.  They are both on the tabien bahn  They have entered and exited many times over the years on their Thai passports.  When they turned 15 they obtained Thai ID cards.  Neither of them have served in any military and went to university in the US.  They have travelled a few times to Thailand in their 20's and no one ever said a thing about Thai military service.  Now in their 30's I really doubt the Thai military will want them.  The oldest one owns property in Thailand but both live and work in the US.  

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3 hours ago, Hanuman2547 said:

My luk krung kids were born in the US.  We registered their births with a Thai consulate and they issued a Thai birth certificate.  Then we applied for Thai passports which they received in about three weeks time.  It was much easier doing it in the US then in Thailand.  They are both on the tabien bahn  They have entered and exited many times over the years on their Thai passports.  When they turned 15 they obtained Thai ID cards.  Neither of them have served in any military and went to university in the US.  They have travelled a few times to Thailand in their 20's and no one ever said a thing about Thai military service.  Now in their 30's I really doubt the Thai military will want them.  The oldest one owns property in Thailand but both live and work in the US.  

Thanks for your response, I think I’m worrying about nothing in regards to the military service. 
 I will apply for their passports tomorrow with the Thai embassy London.

 

cheers 

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