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Who's a 'Thai resident'?


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For a hole-in-one at my local course a golfer may win some money prize, but only if golfer is 'Thai or Thai Resident'. I am not Thai but i don't know if i am a Thai resident. I have a stamp in my passport, like many guys. Will i ever qualify?

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If you live here in Thailand year round on extensions of your visa or if you have been granted permanent residence, then you are indeed a resident albeit a farang resident. Being a resident and being granted permanent residence are quite different.

Perhaps they meant a Thai citizen?

Good luck with the golf.

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Officially no foreigner is a resident unless they have a "residence permit" that one can obtain after staying legally in Thailand on consecutive visas for 3 years (or was it 2 years? getting old).

The residence permit cost somewhere around 200,000 Baht and a large amount of paper work. After paying there is no guarantee that one will actually get it, so money is lost.

So if that is what they mean by resident, just staying here does not mean one is a resident oficially.

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It's like all those overpriced hotel deals. Best is to query the cup organiser, by terminology anyone living in Thailand (i.e. except tourists) would qualify as resident has nothing to do with immigrant.

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Let's keep this simple.

I would imagine what they mean by "Thai Resident" is a person that resides in Thailand (has his home here) ....not a tourist touring the country.

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Officially no foreigner is a resident unless they have a "residence permit" that one can obtain after staying legally in Thailand on consecutive visas for 3 years (or was it 2 years? getting old).

The residence permit cost somewhere around 200,000 Baht and a large amount of paper work. After paying there is no guarantee that one will actually get it, so money is lost.

So if that is what they mean by resident, just staying here does not mean one is a resident oficially.

"A foreigner who lives in Thailand for more than 180 days in a tax year (the calendar year) is considered a Thai resident for tax purposes. A resident is required to file taxes on all income received within Thailand as well as income received from foreign sources brought into Thailand." [extract from translated tax guidance]

Try that one out on them. They might apply a bit of intelligence and recognise that if you are subject to paying Thai taxes it would be churlish of them to regard you as non-resident, whatever the legalities of different forms of residence. There is never one answer to this type of question - the question always should be met by "resident for what purpose?"

Some national parks (governement run) accept drivers licences as a proof of residence for their specific purpose of differential fee charging. Perhaps throw that one in as well.

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Officially no foreigner is a resident unless they have a "residence permit" that one can obtain after staying legally in Thailand on consecutive visas for 3 years (or was it 2 years? getting old).

The residence permit cost somewhere around 200,000 Baht and a large amount of paper work. After paying there is no guarantee that one will actually get it, so money is lost.

So if that is what they mean by resident, just staying here does not mean one is a resident oficially.

I am +20 years officially resident in Thailand it was the time that it stil was cheaper than now

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Officially no foreigner is a resident unless they have a "residence permit" that one can obtain after staying legally in Thailand on consecutive visas for 3 years (or was it 2 years? getting old).

The residence permit cost somewhere around 200,000 Baht and a large amount of paper work. After paying there is no guarantee that one will actually get it, so money is lost.

So if that is what they mean by resident, just staying here does not mean one is a resident oficially.

Unless the rules have changed since i got my resident visa (at that time 50,000) it is not payable until the visa is approved.

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To get discount rates on golf, and many other fees that are at Thai rates, you need only show a drivers licence or other document such as a lease to get the 'resident rate'. Regardless of what your documents are or what your 'resident status' is, you can be sure that payment for any hole in one will be wriggled out of unless you are a Thai national.

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To get discount rates on golf, and many other fees that are at Thai rates, you need only show a drivers licence or other document such as a lease to get the 'resident rate'. Regardless of what your documents are or what your 'resident status' is, you can be sure that payment for any hole in one will be wriggled out of unless you are a Thai national.

I don't have Thai residency but I have a license.

Personally I don't see any decent benefit to having permanent residency. Nothing that's worth 200,000 baht.

I do like that it is supposed to be one step closer to citizenship but realistically that's not really ever going to happen anyway.

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It would be interesting to know what happened to expats and foreigner workers living in Burma post-coup. Did they expel foreigners, close or nationalise foreign companies?

PR...and B120...will buy you a cup of joe at Starbucks. No reporting but still need to pay for re-entry stamps if you travel abroad. Seriously, what is that worth???

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If you live here in Thailand year round on extensions of your visa or if you have been granted permanent residence, then you are indeed a resident albeit a farang resident. Being a resident and being granted permanent residence are quite different.

Perhaps they meant a Thai citizen?

Good luck with the golf.

They undoubtedly did mean Thai citizen. Resident is regularly misused, since anyone who lives, or resides, here - or in any other country, for that matter - is resident in the country.

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Not quite so regarding living in a place and 'residency'. Many folks live in a place (country or territory) illegally and under those conditions can never be considered 'residents'. Would you consider all the Thai long time 'overstayers', say of 20 years, residents of T'land?

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As far as the courses up here in Chiangmai are concerned a "Thai Resident" for discount, cheap rate purposes are concerned it is Thai's, and foreigners who can produce a work permit or a Thai driving licence.

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