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pneumonia


rodknock
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had an event on 16nov. no control.

went to a hospital in  Bangkok on 20nov.

did 3ecg test. complete blood work up, chest x-ray, echo cardiograph.

came up with diagnoses of pneumonia and infection

prescribed meiact 3 times a day, 21pills

doxycycline 100mg. 1am, 1pm.

am reaching the end of prescribed meds.

keep running a low grade temp, which would be indicative of infection.

what is a better medication for my issue.

6yrs. ago when had pneumonia in the u.s. was prescribed, augmenten.

would it be safe to switch toaugmenten?

the doctor i saw at the hospital is only there on sat.

thanks

 

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Go back to the doc. Get checked out. Also ask about mycoplasm ( walking pneumonia - takes 5-6 weeks of antibiotics ) or fungal infection.

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24 minutes ago, rodknock said:

keep running a low grade temp, which would be indicative of infection.

Get and use a COVID ATK just to rule that out (or in).

 

Drink lots of fluids and rest.

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Which antibiotic to use for pneumonia depends entirely on what organism is responsible. Note that not all pneumonia is vactrrial, and viral pneumonias will not respond to antibiotics.

 

You are already on antibiotics that cover the most common causative bacteria including mycoplasma Augmentin is unlikely to be an improvement.

 

I suggest you repeat the COVID test and continue the current meds until you are able to see doctor again.

 

This is assuming you are feeling better just have linering low grade fever. If acutely ill or short of breath don't wait for your prior doctor, go straight to hospital ER. 

 

 

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  • 3 months later...

would appreciate a recommendation an infectious disease specialist, pulmonologist, or et. al. to confirm why such tertiary antibiotic.

 

 

following up on this question of what antibiotic. 

the pathogen has not yet been identified, however tests done were

Influenza A+B NAAT test (negative) Covid-19 NEAR test (negative) Streptococcus Group A test (negative), and gram positive sputum culture (normal flora). doc started my father on levoflaxin. This is considered a tertiary antibiotic by NHS, NIH, and NCID (Singapore) with amoxicillin considered first course of treatment. After 4 days just stable, no real improvement, and of course more weakness from the levoflaxin. 

 

would appreciate a recommendation an infectious disease specialist, pulmonologist, or et. al. to confirm why such tertiary antibiotic. 

are planning a procalcitonin and respiratory viral panel (not sure why they did not do this in the ER 5 days ago) when we can get to the hospital as we cannot get home service(!) here (still trying)

 

thus we are stuck on koh samui. we do not interact with locals (have doing best practices for 3 years--no indoor restaurants, bars, etc.) live in caregivers also do not interact with others without distances and masking. (this yes is unlike 99.9 percent of thailand).  thus the microbial resistance may not been so important re location. 

 

thanks. 

 

re amoxicillin vs fluoroquinolones, note current guidelines from US NIH and UK NHS

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng138

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6812437/

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19 hours ago, ayahuasca said:

would appreciate a recommendation an infectious disease specialist, pulmonologist, or et. al. to confirm why such tertiary antibiotic.

 

 

following up on this question of what antibiotic. 

the pathogen has not yet been identified, however tests done were

Influenza A+B NAAT test (negative) Covid-19 NEAR test (negative) Streptococcus Group A test (negative), and gram positive sputum culture (normal flora). doc started my father on levoflaxin. This is considered a tertiary antibiotic by NHS, NIH, and NCID (Singapore) with amoxicillin considered first course of treatment. After 4 days just stable, no real improvement, and of course more weakness from the levoflaxin. 

 

would appreciate a recommendation an infectious disease specialist, pulmonologist, or et. al. to confirm why such tertiary antibiotic. 

are planning a procalcitonin and respiratory viral panel (not sure why they did not do this in the ER 5 days ago) when we can get to the hospital as we cannot get home service(!) here (still trying)

 

thus we are stuck on koh samui. we do not interact with locals (have doing best practices for 3 years--no indoor restaurants, bars, etc.) live in caregivers also do not interact with others without distances and masking. (this yes is unlike 99.9 percent of thailand).  thus the microbial resistance may not been so important re location. 

 

thanks. 

 

re amoxicillin vs fluoroquinolones, note current guidelines from US NIH and UK NHS

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng138

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6812437/

You are not going to be able to get the tests and specialist consultations you want on Koh Samui. Only small community level hospitals there.

 

Need to go to the mainland or Bangkok.

 

On the mainland the nearest large hospital is Surat Thani which is a (government) regional level faclity

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