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Thai Ministry Readies Nationwide System To Control Floods


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Ministry readies nationwide system to control floods

By The Nation

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The Interior Ministry is setting up a nationwide flood-control system in order to cope with anticipated torrential rains and thunderstorms as the wet season hits its peak next month.

One of the six measures would be to protect people from electrocution in urban areas, and provincial authorities have been asked to design and put in place anti-shock mechanisms.

Citing a warning about the La Nina phenomenon, Interior Minister Chaovarat Chanweerakul issued a directive yesterday ordering overall preventive and relief efforts through the Department of Disaster Prevention and Mitigation.

Local authorities and governors' offices across the country have been instructed to survey water resources and estimate the possibility of flooding and mudslides in their areas and provide 24-hour surveillance.

They are instructed to also ready communication and relief measures, or turn to other government agencies or nearby military units for logistical support. The preparation of public health measures and disease-control solutions have been ordered, while security is being put in place to maintain order and prevent crime in cases of mass evacuation.

A Bt50-million emergency fund has been made ready for each of the 75 provinces, with the exception of Bangkok. However, the funds will be distributed very carefully to prevent possible corruption, Chaovarat said in a videoconference with all governors yesterday.

Weather forecasts show heavy rains, which may lead to flash flooding in 20 provinces in the North and Northeast. Provinces with mountainous areas have specifically been warned of mudslides.

In Chiang Rai's Muang district, 20,000 households in 23 villages are still isolated after a section of a key road was washed away. Though a makeshift bridge is being constructed, the efforts are being hampered by heavy rain.

In Phrae, an entire village of 500 people in Wang Chuen district has been evacuated due to two-metre-high flooding thanks to two days of non-stop raining. Around 1,000 rai of farmland has been submerged and another 500 households were also affected.

In Nan, all 15 districts have been warned of floods, as mud poured into several villages as well as urban areas in two districts, causing damage to 100 homes.

Nan River and Lee Creek are also swelling and inundating business areas in Muang Nan municipality, while 2,000 rai of corn farms in Pua district and a key route are under water. A mudslide has also blocked the road to the tourist site of Doi Phu Kha.

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-- The Nation 2010-09-16

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My consensus for what it is or is not worth , for all of the plans to CONTROL the problems of flooding accompaned by the usual ' The effects of the planing is most noticeable by its absence ' , has not been noted by the weather !!!!!!!!!!!!!

Here we have more of the same , whereas in fact they talk about a huge 'Plan ' to be in readiness AFTER THE FACT , that is at least more acceptable than no plan ????????????

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I'm quite shocked that they have not brought in consultants from overseas to assist them.  The red shirts could put Khun Thaksin in a chair facing the floods/mudslides and he would command them to retreat.  No? Didn't work for a guy called Knut (Canute) either. 

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Let's see - Bt 50m for 75 provinces to prevent flooding? Hmm.... that works out to around 20,000 USD per province? What are they going to do? Put up signs to direct the water somewhere else?

Give me strength!!! rolleyes.gif

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