Jump to content

Furniture


Recommended Posts

I thought I saw someone mention in another thread that bringing furniture from overseas (USA in my case) is problematic. Their point was that it wouldn't last in the climate, but it may have been due to bug problems, not sure. I've caught on that much of my electronics and kitchen gear (electric) will have to be replaced.

But what about my favorite leather reclining chair? And a higher priced bed. I'm pretty fond of them. I expect to ship via a container at some point down the road, but I am all ears on anybody else's experience concerning bringing stuff from overseas.

Jeepz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest IT Manager

I don't think so. Depending on the type of visa. If it's important to bring old friends, just make sure you have either retirement visa or non B with work permit in place.

Biggest issue is with electronics.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the replies. I continue to whittle down my possessions as I approach retirement. But some stuff, art work, good kitchen gear (all clad pans and the like), and my comfy chair are things I'd like to keep.

Jeepz

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As so many things in Thailand, T.I.T.

Just two months ago, we checked (inofficially as usual) for retirement-visa. The reply in BKK customs house, need work permit.

I do with my company a lot of customs clearing. Personal effects/removals bring head aches and spoil my repudation. Just think of an expatriate moved to LoS and clearing his stuff before he got the WP. As a newcomer, he will not understand the situation being different from the own home country and will blame me professionally for the rest of his stay.

With WP or Thai wife, legally married, it is a different story.

In your case, Jeepz, be prepared to offer something and you will ride smoothly.

Talk to a Thai consulate and try to get a statement, that you are moving to Thailand for retirement and bring your stuff. No guarantee, but it helps.

Or be prepared to offer something and you will ride smoothly. The going rate is

1K per foot. (so 40' container 40 K) and usually nobody will even open the containr door. Again, no guarantee.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Talk to a Thai import agent.

I do not have a work permit but I brought in a 40 ft container

cost 60,000 baht $1500.

I thought it was worth it.

Small electrical items will be a problem as the voltage here is 220

However I undertand that the US uses 220v for heavy duty items like

Fridge, washing machine, so check each item

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Electrics and electronics - 220v 50 ~ so US goods running on 110v 60~ will be useless. Most modern electronics sold outside the US are now multi-voltage, multi-Hertz kit, but I don't know the US market.

Many homes sold to expats are sold 'fully-furnished' esp. in BKK, Pattaya and Phuket. This means you should only bring a few favourite items (such as your rocking-swinging armchair). Personally I brought in a couple of thousand books - but that's my taste.

Do you know where you are going to live? If you do not have a property yet, and intend to rent until you settle, then pack your goods into store and come out with a couple of suitcases. You'll get a far better idea of what you need from home after a couple of months in a furnished apartment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah I think save your money. bring bugger all and toss the rest or sell it off. Or if yo uhave a property back there then leave the stuff at the property. You are leqaving to start a new life so make it that way....leave your old life behind. Thailand is a different place and you will need to make adjustments. Dont think you can have everything the same here as u do at home. Here u will be a target for greedy people trying to get hold of your money, so inreality it is not going to be all roses for you. Dont mean to be negative but you do need to think it over before bringing whole containers of stuff over. Beleive me there is nothing better than the feeling of getting rid of all that stuff from a previous life......it is clutter, junk, colateral <deleted> and is stressful.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Electrics and electronics - 220v 50 ~ so US goods running on 110v 60~ will be useless. Most modern electronics sold outside the US are now multi-voltage, multi-Hertz kit, but I don't know the US market.

Here is a useful weblink that no world traveler should be without:

http://www.equitech.com/support/worldpwr.html

With regard to the quoted passage, many modern electronic devices do indeed have "auto-sensing" power supplies. In other words, they will typically have a logo that says something like "100-240VAC, 50-60Hz." For devices like these, the only thing you have to worry about having the proper plug/receptable. Thai-style power outlets look the same as those in many places in continental Europe (e.g., Spain).

Other items like some desktop computers, will have a switch on the back panel to select either 100-120VAC or 200-230VAC. Selecting the wrong one, or not changing it will almost surely "smoke" the power supply.

You need to look very carefully for the electrical characteristics of every device that you plan to bring with you. If you bring a device that is only rated for 60-cycle power and try to use it in Thailand (or other places with 50-cycle power), then regardless of the voltage or current applied, you will most likely "smoke it."

Common items that fall into this category are things like electric toothbrushes, electric razors, and many other things with a motor or transformer. The majority of the time, these kinds of devices are rated for 60-cycle power or 50-cycle power, but rarely both.

Hope this helps.

Spee

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When I moved here, just brought my books and music, 1500cd's, everthing else I had in the US gave away, threw away or donated it. Much easier to repalce everything here.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey, Jeepz, moved here two years ago from Hawaii and left everything behind except two huge duffels as regular airline baggage and paid Korea airlines for a third bag 98kg $75 as excess.

My top of the line Lazy Boy leather recliner left behind, it cost me $1000 a couple of months earlier. Bought a Lazy Boy recliner here, same brand name, same leather, etc. for $500. Question: How much does it cost to ship an easy chair to Thailand and pay duty on it.

Electrical appliances can be brought in a duffel and if necessary pay the extra baggage charge. No duty that way. I operated my laptop by using a transformer for a year until advised not necessary, my laptop is electrically smart and works on either voltage. Transformers are not expensive here if you have an appliance that is 110 and you are attached to it.

I do miss my german triangle slicing tool with inserts $25 that could have come via duffel, my Thai one is not quite the same, but the cucumbers don't know the difference.

Most Thai beds are single mattress and hard as ######. I bought a "Serta" brand name new mattress here for about $500 with the exta pillow top and the no need to turn feature, also a mite spray feature. Since my mattress and box spring are quite thick, my bed is high off the floor, rendering Thai headboards too low. Had a custom headboad with book shelves built to order for $35 out of cheap wood. Teak would be more but custom made makes dreams come true.

Major department stores have everything available in the U.S. except perhaps for a coffee maker that has a timer and grinds the beans for you and then makes the coffee as timed. I am still working on getting an ice maker as the water here is not potable, so unless you are an ice freak like me, there is little else here you can't get. My clothes washer cost me $400 because it has a water heater built in. Dishwasher was more, $500 because I insisted on a chrome front. Garbage disposal was $200 but it is an "insinkerator".

My extra deep 19 inch 250 count cotton sheets were pricey, $100 but botom sheet is deep pocket, pillowcases not included, but of the latest color. Major department store for the latest in U.S. items, including every kitchen gadget immagineable.

I concur with the posts that say your starting a new life, come with the minimum. A neighbor farang shipped all his "stuff" from the U.S. paid huge shipping and duty fees and now his rooms are filled with too much furniture, grandfather clock that reaches the ceiling, etc. I can't believe that when you add the shipping costs, insurance and duty to items brought here from the U.S. that you couldn't have bought them here for the same cost or less, and it is new and fits the rooms here.

PM me if you want me to check a price for you on any specific item. Good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I thought I saw someone mention in another thread that bringing furniture from overseas (USA in my case) is problematic. Their point was that it wouldn't last in the climate, but it may have been due to bug problems, not sure. I've caught on that much of my electronics and kitchen gear (electric) will have to be replaced.

But what about my favorite leather reclining chair? And a higher priced bed. I'm pretty fond of them. I expect to ship via a container at some point down the road, but I am all ears on anybody else's experience concerning bringing stuff from overseas.

Jeepz

Jeepz...you need to have an O-A visa or an O visa extended for a year in Thailand to be eligible to bring effects with you. For a retiree with a one year extended visa no work permit is called for. ( unless they use it as means of painless extraction from you when the goods arrive :o )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.





×
×
  • Create New...