Jump to content

Public backlash as Thais slam new pick-up passenger rules


webfact

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, tuktuktuk said:

As I said in a related post, we bought a car seat for my wife's granddaughter.  Her parents tried it once and stopped because she didn't like it.  They say kids here aren't like in the US.  They can't stand to be restrained.  Kids in the US don't like it either, but after a few hours of screaming they usually surrender.

You know tuktuktuk, I think, in one short paragraph, you have gone right to heart of the problem that pervades this country and has a direct bearing on this topic. If a child is not taught, to accept and obey simple rules when they're young, they will never accept them later in life.

 

It was Aristotle wasn't it who said: “Give me a child until he is 7 and I will show you the man.”

Edited by Moonlover
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 255
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

22 hours ago, Notadoctor said:

As a comparison to anything Australia is not that good as it has a pretty bad road safety record, that is only improving through a long drawn out campaigns in both the states and nationwide. They unlike Thailand have looked to international science for help

http://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/cause-of-death/road-traffic-accidents/by-country

Europe is slightly better but this is not surprising as the miles driven perr year are lower by far in europe.  US is nearly double.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

refer you all to the following

About time the issue was brought into the open and we start to see some sensible considerations of the problems,

and what can be done to make it safer for people to travel in the back of pickups. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Moonlover said:

Oh I wish. The number of times I have sat and cringed, when travelling with my wife's niece!

 

Small child, sat on knee of unrestrained grandma in the front seat. Right in the firing line of a deadly airbag!

Yes they care so much about there kids in Thailand.

They even have,   the child on board stickers on the car/ SUV, because they look good,    kids are just playing on the back seat,  no seat belt , no car seat.

Yes they do take care big time in Thailand.

Good job :coffee1:

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe start with the Police arresting themselves,   as they don't where seat belts and they  travel in the open back of pick up. Maybe it will be ok for official police business. ?

 

where are they going to put arrested people.............LOL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/7/2017 at 11:47 AM, harrry said:

http://www.worldlifeexpectancy.com/cause-of-death/road-traffic-accidents/by-country

Europe is slightly better but this is not surprising as the miles driven perr year are lower by far in europe.  US is nearly double.

For a start you need to look at ALL the stats - not just deaths per 100k, traffic density, road mileage vehicles etc etc and Europe is a far too broad a brush to draw any solid conclusions.

Oz just in the last 20 years has improved but like the US they lag behind countries like Sweden, Holland Germany and UK. sadly Thailand doesn't even compile/publish complete statistics.

Edited by Notadoctor
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/7/2017 at 11:57 AM, jojothai said:

refer you all to the following

About time the issue was brought into the open and we start to see some sensible considerations of the problems,

and what can be done to make it safer for people to travel in the back of pickups. 

 

Nothing can be done for those on the tray of a pickup....the only solution is not to be there. THis is not the issue though - it is the abmismal lack of forethought by the authorities that led them to inroduce this dictum (not a law) just a few days before 20 million hit the road in pickups.

Edited by Notadoctor
Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, Notadoctor said:

Nothing can be done for those on the tray of a pickup....the only solution is not to be there. THis is not the issue though - it is the abmismal lack of forethought by the authorities that led them to inroduce this dictum (not a law) just a few days before 20 million hit the road in pickups.

If nothing can be done for those in trays of pickups, and they reasoned this dictum was appropriate, shouldn't they consider banning motorbikes totally.

Wouldn't that be seen as the simplest way to stop the majority of the accidents and deaths in Thailand?

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, jojothai said:

If nothing can be done for those in trays of pickups, and they reasoned this dictum was appropriate, shouldn't they consider banning motorbikes totally.

Wouldn't that be seen as the simplest way to stop the majority of the accidents and deaths in Thailand?

 

 

probably one of the most facile responses so far.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Notadoctor said:

probably one of the most facile responses so far.

Figures for the last 3 Songkran years comparing percentage of motorbike and pick-ups involved in accidents:

 

2014- pick-ups -14%     motorbikes- 59%

2015- pick-ups- 14%      motorbikes -61%

 2016- pick-ups - 15%     motorbikes -64%

 


 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, bannork said:

Figures for the last 3 Songkran years comparing percentage of motorbike and pick-ups involved in accidents:

 

2014- pick-ups -14%     motorbikes- 59%

2015- pick-ups- 14%      motorbikes -61%

 2016- pick-ups - 15%     motorbikes -64%

 


 

Seriously? You want to publicise your profound ignorance of road safety by firstly suggesting a preposterous and facile solution and then further adding a set of numbers in the vain hope they give you some kind of self-perceived credibility??

 

Edited by Notadoctor
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/7/2017 at 8:55 AM, Moonlover said:

I'm very sure that a pick-up with an extended cab that has factory fitted seats and seat belts would comply with the law. Bevup, I'm sure you have nothing to worry about.

 

However extended cabs that do not come so equipped are a different matter and I doubt whether retro-fitments would be acceptable or safe. Read Elkski's submission above, particularly with regards to anchorage points. In that regard, retrofits would almost certainly not be up to standard.

Retrofits are ok as i have seen many of the engineering requirements needed to do this on the net ( they even provide the instruction & hardware

But i have discovered that the Vigo is actually only designed to have 2 people in the back as there is only 1 factory fitted nut ( 7/16 th - minimum requirement for belts) covered by the sheet metal in the middle of back compartment

But they have not equipped the side pillar so it is a simple matter of beefing it up so the bolts dont pull threw (looks like they have the holes but did not put a nut behind it & where one would put a retractor they have the back door cables there so i am going for a fixed style )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Notadoctor said:

Seriously? You want to publicise your profound ignorance of road safety by firstly suggesting a preposterous and facile solution and then further adding a set of numbers in the vain hope they give you some kind of self-perceived credibility??

 

Calm down dear sir, this is Thai Visa and Thailand. My approval of a ban on motorbikes was ....a joke. I'm fully aware that there is no public transport upcountry; a motorbike, pick-up or car is essential for rural folk.

I've been driving since 1974  and have yet to have an accident in a 4 wheeled vehicle. In contrast, I've had 4 accidents on a motorbike, 3 of which were not my fault. 

A motorbike is by far the most dangerous vehicle to drive in Thailand as statistics bear out, whether one is at fault or not, but economy and convenience, like the movement of people in pick-ups, dictates its necessity.

Happy driving !

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/10/2017 at 9:00 AM, bannork said:

Calm down dear sir, this is Thai Visa and Thailand. My approval of a ban on motorbikes was ....a joke. I'm fully aware that there is no public transport upcountry; a motorbike, pick-up or car is essential for rural folk.

I've been driving since 1974  and have yet to have an accident in a 4 wheeled vehicle. In contrast, I've had 4 accidents on a motorbike, 3 of which were not my fault. 

A motorbike is by far the most dangerous vehicle to drive in Thailand as statistics bear out, whether one is at fault or not, but economy and convenience, like the movement of people in pick-ups, dictates its necessity.

Happy driving !

 

And you didn't even quote the new year figures 2017??

Most of the accidents (36.6%) were caused by drink driving, followed by speeding (31.31%). Most, or 81.82%, involved motorcycles, and 8% pick-up trucks.

 

Obviously these statistics aren't relevant to road safety, so they can be ignored and keep going up each year..

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, jojothai said:

And you didn't even quote the new year figures 2017??

Most of the accidents (36.6%) were caused by drink driving, followed by speeding (31.31%). Most, or 81.82%, involved motorcycles, and 8% pick-up trucks.

 

Obviously these statistics aren't relevant to road safety, so they can be ignored and keep going up each year..

Shows how much it was relevant to start the motorbike discussion.

Of course it was tongue in cheek to suggest banning motorbikes,

but only reflects the same approach as the authorities to pickup trucks.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 4/11/2017 at 3:09 PM, jojothai said:

Shows how much it was relevant to start the motorbike discussion.

Of course it was tongue in cheek to suggest banning motorbikes,

but only reflects the same approach as the authorities to pickup trucks.

 

I have seen people throw buckets at water at motorcylces -- so the stat is not that surprising....

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.










×
×
  • Create New...