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Man In Wheelchair Not Allowed To Board Jetstar Flight In Bangkok


tuky

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0,,6504408,00.jpg Turned away ... Glen McDonnell was left feeling humiliated at an airport in Bangkok / Northern Territory News

  • Man in wheelchair not allowed on plane
  • Had already checked luggage in
  • Jetstar eventually put him on a flight

<DIV id=article-corpus>

A WHEELCHAIR-bound man felt humiliated at a foreign airport when Jetstar refused to let him on board because he couldn't walk.

Glen McDonnell, 36, had travelled with the budget carrier from Darwin to Thailand via Singapore.

But when he was boarding the plane at Bangkok for his return flight, Jetstar staff told him they were unable to take him home.

Speaking from Bangkok airport yesterday, Mr McDonnell told the

Edited by tuky
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Speaking from Bangkok airport yesterday, Mr McDonnell told the Northern Territory News that he felt humiliated.

"They told me I'm not allowed on the plane," he said.

"I think it's very discriminating."

Mr McDonnell, who was left paraplegic after a motorcycle accident when he was 15 years old, travelled by himself to Thailand on December 2 for a two-month holiday.

His trip turned into a nightmare when he faced staff at the boarding gate in Bangkok.

"I checked in my luggage and went through customs and all that," the psychology student said.

"And then the station manager asked me if I could walk at all. I said no and he said I wasn't allowed on board.

"He was quite arrogant about it."

Mr McDonnell, who lives in Wagaman, said that he had to check out again and wait for his luggage to return.

However, he said that after his "making a fuss" the airline booked him on another flight last night and gave him a $150 voucher for a hotel room in Singapore.

Jetstar Asia failed to return calls from the Northern Territory News last night.

The airline's Australian sister company came under fire for similar incidents in 2005 when two Hobart sportspeople were told they could not travel on a Jetstar flight because they were wheelchair-bound.

To read more go to the Northern Territory News

http://www.news.com.au/travel/story/

Not sure why, but I couldn't post the whole article in the one post...

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0,,6504408,00.jpg Turned away ... Glen McDonnell was left feeling humiliated at an airport in Bangkok / Northern Territory News

  • Man in wheelchair not allowed on plane
  • Had already checked luggage in
  • Jetstar eventually put him on a flight

<DIV id=article-corpus>

A WHEELCHAIR-bound man felt humiliated at a foreign airport when Jetstar refused to let him on board because he couldn't walk.

Glen McDonnell, 36, had travelled with the budget carrier from Darwin to Thailand via Singapore.

But when he was boarding the plane at Bangkok for his return flight, Jetstar staff told him they were unable to take him home.

Speaking from Bangkok airport yesterday, Mr McDonnell told the

:o

I'm very sorry that happened.

I don't mean to be disrespectful, but did he advise Jetstar on booking the flight that he required a wheelchair/assistance to board? Or did he just arrive, expecting to board?

I didn't see that fact mentioned either way in the accompaning text.

He should have verified with the airline that they were aware he would require assistance and a wheelchair (which they would supply) before he checked in.

He would be helped to transfer from his own wheelchair to the airline supplied one.

Also, not to be disrepectful again, but there could be legal problems if he could not walk at all. In the U.S., although it's seldom admitted, an airline does have the right to deny a passenger a flight if in their good judgement the flight could be medically hazardous to the passenger. Airlines may deny women the right to fly in their 8th or 9th month of pregnancy for that reason. Now suppose he can not walk at all. In the event of an emergency, how is he to get off the does happen.

But the fact that he was later allowed to fly, probably just shows he arrived at the airport without notifying the airline that he would require a wheelchair and assistance, and they were unaware of his situation. That is just an guess on my part, so I could easily be wrong...again.

:D

Edited by IMA_FARANG
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0,,6504408,00.jpg Turned away ... Glen McDonnell was left feeling humiliated at an airport in Bangkok / Northern Territory News

  • Man in wheelchair not allowed on plane
  • Had already checked luggage in
  • Jetstar eventually put him on a flight

<DIV id=article-corpus>

A WHEELCHAIR-bound man felt humiliated at a foreign airport when Jetstar refused to let him on board because he couldn't walk.

Glen McDonnell, 36, had travelled with the budget carrier from Darwin to Thailand via Singapore.

But when he was boarding the plane at Bangkok for his return flight, Jetstar staff told him they were unable to take him home.

Speaking from Bangkok airport yesterday, Mr McDonnell told the

:D

I'm very sorry that happened.

I don't mean to be disrespectful, but did he advise Jetstar on booking the flight that he required a wheelchair/assistance to board? Or did he just arrive, expecting to board?

I didn't see that fact mentioned either way in the accompaning text.

He should have verified with the airline that they were aware he would require assistance and a wheelchair (which they would supply) before he checked in.

He would be helped to transfer from his own wheelchair to the airline supplied one.

Also, not to be disrepectful again, but could be legal problems if he could not walk at all. In the U.S., although it's seldom admitted, an airline does have the right to deny a passenger a flight if in their good judgement the flight could be hazardous to the passenger. Airlines may deny women boarding in their 8th or 9th month of pregnancy for that reason. Now suppose he can not walk at all. In the event of an emergency, how is he to get off the airplane? So an airline can also deny flight for that reason to a severely disabled person. It may be discrimination, but it's done to avoid a law suit by the family in case something does happen.

But the fact that he was later allowed to fly, probably just shows he arrived at the airport without notifying the airline that he would require a wheelchair and assistance, and they were unaware of his situation. That is just an guess on my part, so I could easily be wrong...again.

:D

Well maybe you are right about that, but then again he flew here on a flight with pornstar airlines.....you would of thought that thru his booking they had already known that he was disabled. Just a thought, I probably expecting too much....BUT how hard is it?

Crap budget airline anyway.....I would sooner flap my arms & fly somewhere :o

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I feel sorry for the guy,sure..Life has dealt him a hard blow,what with the loss of the ability to walk,however...Businesses are in a tough situation,if the guy falls during seating from one wheel chair to another...LAWSUIT.........If the guy cannot get off the plane in an emergency......LAWSUIT...........If the employees helping the disabled man hurt their back........LAWSUIT......It is not this chaps fault,it's just the crazy world we live in,where lawyers work for a percentage of the winnings.I think perhapes the airline staff could have handled it better,but then the airline is only as good as its staff. :o

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I feel sorry for the guy,sure..Life has dealt him a hard blow,what with the loss of the ability to walk,however...Businesses are in a tough situation,if the guy falls during seating from one wheel chair to another...LAWSUIT.........If the guy cannot get off the plane in an emergency......LAWSUIT...........If the employees helping the disabled man hurt their back........LAWSUIT......It is not this chaps fault,it's just the crazy world we live in,where lawyers work for a percentage of the winnings.I think perhapes the airline staff could have handled it better,but then the airline is only as good as its staff. :o

Wells theres no prizes for guessing what they have coming now:

LAWSUIT :D Dribbledik airline

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"I checked in my luggage and went through customs and all that," the psychology student said.

"And then the station manager asked me if I could walk at all. I said no and he said I wasn't allowed on board.

"He was quite arrogant about it."

Mr McDonnell, who lives in Wagaman, said that he had to check out again and wait for his luggage to return.

I thought this part to be a little rough.

Check in, clear Immigration, make it to the gate to then be told by some arrogant p1ssant that you cannot board because you cannot walk...

I feel for the bloke, Thailand isn't exactly disabled friendly so he would have had a harder time of it all than we do, then to be treated like that by some twit in a uniform certainly would not be the icing on the cake. Perhaps if he was treated to one of the new Thai cocktails he might leave with atleast one pleasent holiday memory.

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I think I remember a similar type of story about Air Asia not too many years ago.

http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/Air-Asia-Sha...&pid=501954

In the case of airlines operating in Australia, to or from Australia or where tickets are booked in Australia airlines must carry wheelchairs and and all other medical or mobility equipment needed. Details can be found on the HREOC website and in the The Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport 2002.

Budget airlines have tried to worm out but have been rebuffed allready. THey know it and it can be expensive for them if they do not comply

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theres no doubt about it, jetstar is in for a court case.....naturally my client will settle out of court for lets say, 300 million baht (85% cut to me :D ....standard thieving lawyer fee) :o

Sorry neverdie Australia is not america and our thieving lawyers are limited by our low settlements in how mush they can gouge out of the clients.

In the first instance there will be no lawyers....just concilliation where the airline will agree not to repeat it and at best the poor guy may get a free flight. Of course if the airline is stupid and won't settle and it goes to court it is a different story but even Air Asia can't be that stupid.

Edited by harrry
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theres no doubt about it, jetstar is in for a court case.....naturally my client will settle out of court for lets say, 300 million baht (85% cut to me :D ....standard thieving lawyer fee) :o

Sorry neverdie Australia is not america and our thieving lawyers are limited by our low settlements in how mush they can gouge out of the clients.

In the first instance there will be no lawyers....just concilliation where the airline will agree not to repeat it and at best the poor guy may get a free flight. Of course if the airline is stupid and won't settle and it goes to court it is a different story but even Air Asia can't be that stupid.

harry, i think you will find the level of stupidity in litigation in Australia has bypassed what goes on in the states.....i have a good understanding of it, although my previous post did exaggerate things a little & don't worry our Ozzie lawyers can still get more than our fair share :D

Edited by neverdie
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harry, i think you will find the level of stupidity in litigation in Australia has bypassed what goes on in the states.....i have a good understanding of it, although my previous post did exaggerate things a little & don't worry our Ozzie lawyers can still get more than our fair share :o

Not anything like in other countries. I got $150000 for losing a leg in a motorcycle accident....of which the lawyers ended up with about 20000.

On a brighter not a western australian university had to spend over 760000 on access improvements as a result of a concilliated complaint I made with no lawyer involved.

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Glen McDonnell was humiliated by JetStar.

JetStar is an AUSTRALIAN airlines.

JetStar refuse Glen (not Thai Airport).

This is an Australian domestic matter.

This have nothing to do with Thailand, Thai Airlines, or Thai Airport.

Unfortunately it happens in Bangkok, that all.

I guess he did not tell JetStar when he does the booking (intentionally or otherwise), which may have cost him more for the extra service.

JetStar was not prepared with the right personnel, equipment, seating arrangement.

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So

This have nothing to do with Thailand, Thai Airlines, or Thai Airport.

Unfortunately it happens in Bangkok, that all.

I guess he did not tell JetStar when he does the booking (intentionally or otherwise), which may have cost him more for the extra service.

JetStar was not prepared with the right personnel, equipment, seating arrangement.

So Bangkok is not in Thailand. Sorry I will have to check my atlas I thought it wass.

And as this was a return journey it is obvious they were informed.

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harry, i think you will find the level of stupidity in litigation in Australia has bypassed what goes on in the states.....i have a good understanding of it, although my previous post did exaggerate things a little & don't worry our Ozzie lawyers can still get more than our fair share :D

Not anything like in other countries. I got $150000 for losing a leg in a motorcycle accident....of which the lawyers ended up with about 20000.

On a brighter not a western australian university had to spend over 760000 on access improvements as a result of a concilliated complaint I made with no lawyer involved.

Yes, I understand what you are saying regarding the 'payout', a friend of mine lost his leg in a car accident in the 90ies & was actually only awarded as part of his payout $8000 for the purchases of prosthesis (he was in his 30ies) & now he is spending almost that much every couple of years to get a new leg.

The point I was trying to make is that things have changed in the USA now & it is Australia that has plenty of stupid litigation cases running, ones where people get drunk, fall over, injure themselves and the sue the council regarding the footpath....slipping in supermarkets, acting the dik then expecting to be compensated for it. :o

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This is a tough cookie to call. On the one hand you have the obvious discrimination and the consequences but on the other hand you have the passenger's duty to comply with regulations. For severe disability, I would have thought that there might be a requirement for the passenger to be accompanied by an able bodied friend.

There may be a get out for the airline in that he may be required to inform them when flying (like reconfirming your tickets in the old days). I know he was on his way back but he cannot put other passengers at risk.

My thoughts are that the airline didn't make a note of his extra requirements and were not prepared to deal with him when he turned up.

As said, crap airline.

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For severe disability, I would have thought that there might be a requirement for the passenger to be accompanied by an able bodied friend.

I understand he is disabled in a wheelchair and not ill. As long as he can transfer himself from a wheelchair to the aircraft seat then any requirement to be accompanied by an able bodied friend would be discrimination.

There may be a get out for the airline in that he may be required to inform them when flying (like reconfirming your tickets in the old days). I know he was on his way back but he cannot put other passengers at risk.

In the UK wheelchair users are advised to notify the airlines 24/48 hours prior to departure.

How can he put other passengers at risk?

Edited by Chris.B
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I think I remember a similar type of story about Air Asia not too many years ago.

http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/Air-Asia-Sha...&pid=501954

In the case of airlines operating in Australia, to or from Australia or where tickets are booked in Australia airlines must carry wheelchairs and and all other medical or mobility equipment needed. Details can be found on the HREOC website and in the The Disability Standards for Accessible Public Transport 2002.

Budget airlines have tried to worm out but have been rebuffed allready. THey know it and it can be expensive for them if they do not comply

I have re-posted harry's comments because he has the knowlege and has posted something for our information.

It sounds to me as if there is a serious case of the left hand not knowing what the right hands is doing in this company....something usually reserved for govt departments.

YOU would think that since this man flew over here with PORNSTAR Airways, then, it would automatically be flagged that he was in a wheel chair & that there would be no further need to recontact the airline to state the obvious. Did they think he was coming to thailand for a spinal cord replacement? :o

As for putting other passengers in danger....what is the difference between the flight over and the one home? You would also have to think that many of the halfwits that seem to travel these days would be a greater danger than this man, not to mention the intoxicated people etc, GET REAL. :D

JET STAR - YOU STINK! :D:D:D

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So

This have nothing to do with Thailand, Thai Airlines, or Thai Airport.

Unfortunately it happens in Bangkok, that all.

I guess he did not tell JetStar when he does the booking (intentionally or otherwise), which may have cost him more for the extra service.

JetStar was not prepared with the right personnel, equipment, seating arrangement.

So Bangkok is not in Thailand. Sorry I will have to check my atlas I thought it wass.

And as this was a return journey it is obvious they were informed.

Thai Airport allows him to use the facilities (700 Baht included in ticket), doesn't matter if he has legs or not. Thai imigration happily process his exit stamp, doesn't matter if he has legs or not. BUT JetStar, an Australian Airline refuse him to board because he cannot walk. All I am saying is that JetStar crew/management could have refuse him in SIN, KUL, HKG, DPS, etc, but it just happens to happen in BKK.

Please blame the Aussie, not Thai.

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Glen McDonnell was humiliated by JetStar.

JetStar is an AUSTRALIAN airlines.

JetStar refuse Glen (not Thai Airport).

This is an Australian domestic matter.

This have nothing to do with Thailand, Thai Airlines, or Thai Airport.

Unfortunately it happens in Bangkok, that all.

I guess he did not tell JetStar when he does the booking (intentionally or otherwise), which may have cost him more for the extra service.

JetStar was not prepared with the right personnel, equipment, seating arrangement.

As much as i can sympathise with this guy there are 2 sides to every story, and ill assume they were already making prep to move him before he " kicked up " ,.......
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