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Even in the west it is difficult to get treatment for ME/CFS as there is no test for the illness and it can be difficult to get a diagnosis.

 

I have read of some interesting results with the use of Low Dose Naltrexone (Revia).

 

There was a recent post on this forum about sourcing the drug.

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On 6/12/2021 at 3:57 PM, Sheryl said:

You can try https://www.bumrungrad.com/en/doctors/Hiroshi-Chantaphakul

 

In general doctors here have very,. very little experience with CFS

Just got back from Bumrungrad, they don't have neither Revia or Naltrexone at their pharmacy, my doctor searched for it. any ideas where i can get it in Bangkok or online? I had it in USA 10 years ago and it worked wonders for me

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9 hours ago, MasterBaker said:

Just got back from Bumrungrad, they don't have neither Revia or Naltrexone at their pharmacy, my doctor searched for it. any ideas where i can get it in Bangkok or online? I had it in USA 10 years ago and it worked wonders for me

You didn't do your homework by reading about sourcing LDN.

 

Be aware ...

 

High Dose Naltrexone (HDN) 50 mg is usually slow release and the slow release version is unsuitable for Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) ME/CFS treatment.

 

As the LDN regime for ME/FCS requires a peak serum level for only a few hours after bedtime slow release is unsuitable.

 

So therefore there is no point in buying HDN and titrating it down yourself to the therapeutic dose of 3 or 4.5 mg.

 

It is better to buy the required non slow release LDN to the required dose from an overseas compounding pharmacy.

 

LDN 2020 Dosing

 

Low-dose naltrexone as a treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome | BMJ Case Reports

 

Full article: Low-dose naltrexone in the treatment of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) (tandfonline.com)

 

 

Edited by LosLobo
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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, LosLobo said:

You didn't do your homework by reading about sourcing LDN.

 

Be aware ...

 

High Dose Naltrexone (HDN) 50 mg is usually slow release and the slow release version is unsuitable for Low Dose Naltrexone (LDN) ME/CFS treatment.

 

As the LDN regime for ME/FCS requires a peak serum level for only a few hours after bedtime slow release is unsuitable.

 

So therefore there is no point in buying HDN and titrating it down yourself to the therapeutic dose of 3 or 4.5 mg.

 

It is better to buy the required non slow release LDN to the required dose from an overseas compounding pharmacy.

 

LDN 2020 Dosing

 

Low-dose naltrexone as a treatment for chronic fatigue syndrome | BMJ Case Reports

 

Full article: Low-dose naltrexone in the treatment of myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) (tandfonline.com)

 

 

Here's a more recent study from the cutting-edge researchers at Stanford. They had significant improvements with minimal side effects using very low-dose aripiprazole, which is cheap and easily available, although you do need pharmacy scales that can weigh down to the milligram level.

 

https://translational-medicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12967-021-02721-9

Edited by oobar
better url
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12 hours ago, MasterBaker said:

Just got back from Bumrungrad, they don't have neither Revia or Naltrexone at their pharmacy, my doctor searched for it. any ideas where i can get it in Bangkok or online? I had it in USA 10 years ago and it worked wonders for me

Your post is off topic!

 

The OP is about ME/CFS not alcohol withdrawal.

Edited by LosLobo
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1 hour ago, oobar said:

Here's a more recent study from the cutting-edge researchers at Stanford. They had significant improvements with minimal side effects using very low-dose aripiprazole, which is cheap and easily available, although you do need pharmacy scales that can weigh down to the milligram level.

 

https://translational-medicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12967-021-02721-9

Aripiprazole (Abilify) is an anti-psychotic and is a controlled drug in Thailand, and therefore might be difficult to source.

Edited by LosLobo
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8 hours ago, LosLobo said:

Aripiprazole (Abilify) is an anti-psychotic and is a controlled drug in Thailand, and therefore might be difficult to source.

Yes, it is major treatment for schizophrenia -- but in dosages 30 or more times the amounts used in the Stanford CFS study.  It can be easily sourced from India.

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On 6/17/2021 at 11:55 AM, oobar said:

Here's a more recent study from the cutting-edge researchers at Stanford. They had significant improvements with minimal side effects using very low-dose aripiprazole, which is cheap and easily available, although you do need pharmacy scales that can weigh down to the milligram level.

 

https://translational-medicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12967-021-02721-9

I personally know several people, myself included, who have fully recoverd from ME/CFS by using the classical Buteyko method. I was sick for 7+ years with it, and the recovery was pretty rapid and solid. You may want to check out some testimonials on youtube, with the emphasis being on the word classical.

Edited by flagator96
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