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Government to Speed Up EV Production Plans


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BANGKOK (NNT) - Thailand is speeding up its plan to manufacture electric vehicles (EVs) for domestic use by 2023.

 

Prime Minister Gen Prayut Chan-o-cha declared the government’s objective to accelerate EV assembly at a seminar organized by the Federation of Thai Industries (FTI) this week. The announcement comes after the Prime Minister met with Young Liu, CEO, and Chairman of Foxconn Technology Group, who announced plans to start EV assembly in Thailand within a year.

 

During the seminar, the Prime Minister emphasizes the importance of developing the EV industry as a key factor in transitioning the Thai economy to align with its focus on S-curve industries and the bio-, circular, and green economic model. He urges cooperation from all sides to help push the economy during this period of uncertainties and conflicts.

 

In addition to speeding up promotions, the government will push to produce key components such as batteries, traction motors, AC/DC converters, portable EV chargers, electrical circuit breakers, and EV smart charging systems in the near future.

 

Foxconn announced last year that it would partner with PTT Plc to establish an EV manufacturing facility in the Eastern Economic Corridor region. The factory is expected to provide a complete operation, including vehicle design, manufacturing, and EV assembly. The company set its manufacturing target at around 50,000 cars per year and plans to increase the number to 150,000 vehicles for its next stage.

 

Gen Prayut added that the government will continue to revise laws and regulations to facilitate the economic restructuring to speed up Thailand’s recovery from the impact of the pandemic. He assures that infrastructure development, R&D, and human resource development will be prioritized in order to strengthen the Thai economy for the future.

 

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An EV joint venture with a Thsiland state-owned enterprise will have the success of Thai Airways. Zero.

 

Meanwhile, BYD (ranked worldwide #3 in 2021 for EV sales) will be exporting its EV's into Thailand (currently zero import tax) and Indonesia will host world's largest EV manufacturer (2021) in global units sold with American privately-owned Tesla, Inc., including a battery factory.

 

Not sure why unranked EV manufacturer Foxconn is interested in EV manufacturing in Thailand when it plans to build EV factories in much more lucrative US, Europe and India markets by allegedly 2024. Foxconn's Thailand EV deal seems more of a Taiwan-to-Thailand government deal than a commercially motivated enterprise. Aka politics?

 

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19 hours ago, snoop1130 said:

Prime Minister Gen Prayut Chan-o-cha declared the government’s objective to accelerate EV assembly at a seminar organized by the Federation of Thai Industries (FTI) this week.

What he means to say is he's asking Japan if they can speed up a bit.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, digger70 said:

They don't look at that, they only See that it isn't fossil Fuel that goes in the vehicle .It's the worlds biggest Scam.

Together with at least 2 other medical scams beginning with "C."

But in cities EVs would shift the pollution from a densely populated area to the remote power fossil fuel generation site. I would be interested in a plug-in hybrid which might do 40 Km on battery around town, but use petrol for long journeys.

Edited by Raphael Hythlodaeus
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1 hour ago, LennyW said:

Hydrogen power will surpass EV's and will be the fuel of the future very soon.

A very valid post. Already used for engines in big ships. Anotherr option in LNG carrying ships is to use the natural boil off gas to run the engines. Can all be Googled. Further, there may be a possibility to run engines on "green" ammonia as per the link below:

 

https://www.man-es.com/discover/two-stroke-ammonia-engine

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Get me a few gallons of water and convert my car and I will be good to go....in theory at least

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water-fuelled_car

 

Water is fully oxidized hydrogen. Hydrogen itself is a high-energy, flammable substance, but its useful energy is released when water is formed. Water will not burn. The process of electrolysis can split water into hydrogen and oxygen, but it takes as much energy to take apart a water molecule as was released when the hydrogen was oxidized to form water. In fact, some energy would be lost in converting water to hydrogen and then burning the hydrogen because some waste heat would always be produced in the conversions. Releasing chemical energy from water, in excess or in equal proportion to the energy required to facilitate such production, would therefore violate the first or second law of thermodynamics.[5][6][7][8]

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4 hours ago, PETERTHEEATER said:

That's  what they said about the Hindenburg......

Actually what drove the Hindenburg were diesel engines and the hydrogen was in gasbags for lifting the airship. The cause was most likely an electrostatic spark and ;leaking hydrogen. https://www.airships.net/hindenburg/disaster/#:~:text=Almost 80 years of research, spark) that ignited leaking hydrogen.

 

In road vehicles the hydrogen will be in a strong metal container and not in a loose gasbag.

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On 7/1/2022 at 9:42 AM, ThailandRyan said:

Then add in the 900kg of batteries, full of all types of metals, that is not currently an option as only 5% of batteries since 2019 have been recycled, and at a great cost.  To create these batteries fossil fuels are needed, so exactly how is an EV battery green, well other than the cost....

Lithium and copper mining is currently destroying Chile......

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A far better idea would be to get Thailand using near 100% Solar Power first; which should have been done 10 years or more ago.  Too many Creeps up the ladder making too much money out of the current way of making Electricity no doubt !

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On 7/1/2022 at 6:26 PM, billd766 said:

Actually what drove the Hindenburg were diesel engines and the hydrogen was in gasbags for lifting the airship. The cause was most likely an electrostatic spark and ;leaking hydrogen. https://www.airships.net/hindenburg/disaster/#:~:text=Almost 80 years of research, spark) that ignited leaking hydrogen.

 

In road vehicles the hydrogen will be in a strong metal container and not in a loose gasbag.

Also the exterior skin was extremely flammable.

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On 6/30/2022 at 8:42 PM, billd766 said:

Then of course how do you charge your EV at home? Well, the MEA and the PEA will have to upgrade the transformers, cables and meters nationwide.

 

While I am on a roll, how do you charge your EV when you live in a Hi

Rise Condo of perhaps 30 floors? Also, how do you stop other people from charging their cars at your charger, or even using your parking space? How about a 2 car family n 1 condo and 1 charging point, or on street parking?

 

It is a great plan using EV, but I think that the PM is putting the cart before the horse as usual.

 

Soon Kuhn LA will be along telling us we are all wrong and the PM is right.

While we're at it, what happens in a storm when your power outages are damaged? How about the availability of stations throughout the country ?? And so on and so on...

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On 7/1/2022 at 1:47 PM, PETERTHEEATER said:

That's  what they said about the Hindenburg......

Yeh but, in hydrogen cars, they won't be using a balloon for storage...🤓

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On 7/1/2022 at 8:28 AM, Purdey said:

Good idea but. Wouldn’t it be interesting if someone pointed out that the electricity EVs would use comes from fossil fuels?

Someone did , some years ago. Renewables have been rising steadily , currently about 10% so who know what level by the time EV's take the lead.

Concurrent development is the key, just hope the charging infrastructure doesn't get left behind.

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Posted (edited)
12 minutes ago, sandyf said:

Someone did , some years ago. Renewables have been rising steadily , currently about 10% so who know what level by the time EV's take the lead.

Concurrent development is the key, just hope the charging infrastructure doesn't get left behind.

I asked my Juristic office whether they were going to put EV charging stations in the garage.....All I received was a confused look and the question of Why? When I explained i was going to buy an EV they said I would be responsible for adding it to the system and I would have to pay them a fee as they would have to put in a specific system next to the main power generators in the basement.  They said they had discussed it, but it never made it to the Juristic board Committee meeting as no one has such a vehicle.  Says it all right there....Also the parking in my condo garage is a first come first serve type of system, even though I have 2 parking spots guaranteed.  There is a resident who has an EV Motorbike, he just carries the battery up to his unit and charges it there, unfortunately there is no way to do that with cars.....  

Edited by ThailandRyan
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On 7/1/2022 at 1:42 PM, billd766 said:

It is a great plan using EV, but I think that the PM is putting the cart before the horse as usual.

Not going to happen overnight Bill, nothing wrong with making a start. At the end of the day it will not be up to the PM, the public will determine the rate of change. That as you pointed out will be determined by the charging infrastructure. There wouldn't be any LPG vehicles if they couldn't be refueled.

My son and his wife have a petrol and an EV.  He says the EV has been a godsend since the price of petrol shot up. Only ever use his car now when they cannot go and come back on a full charge. He has his own point on white meter and says mileage about half that of petrol.

With adequate charging facilities they will go a long way to improving air quality in cities, but not a single solution for other problems.

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4 hours ago, BayArea said:

While we're at it, what happens in a storm when your power outages are damaged? How about the availability of stations throughout the country ?? And so on and so on...

There are no EVs where I live in rural Kamphaeng Phet. The weather was dry and no storms were heard, yet from 8:40pm until 9:35 last night we had a power cut.

 

On average we get 2 or 3 per week, some for a few seconds, some for minutes and some for more than hour or two.

 

All this is before EV are bought. What will it be like when 50 or 100 people all try to charge their EV overnight.

 

I have said it before.

 

Rebuild the MEA and PEA lines and transformer network. Find places on ALL of the roads to put chargers and only then sell the EVs

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Posted (edited)
11 hours ago, billd766 said:

Rebuild the MEA and PEA lines and transformer network. Find places on ALL of the roads to put chargers and only then sell the EVs

It will be an evolving situation, much the same as other countries.

Last time I went to Malta about 6 years ago, the only EVs were in Valetta, most of the taxi ranks were EVs hooked up waiting for customers.

When I came back from LHR last year I had to get a PCR at the airport. A temporary facility had been set up on the perimeter road and to get to it I had to walk through a huge car park. That had been set up with a charging point on every slot specifically for taxis.

The bulk vehicle purchasers will get priority and the general public will be at the tail end of the project, if ever.

Edited by sandyf
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All very nice and overall better for the enviroment.

 

Seems to me there's a lot more to come with electric vehicle technology; already lighter smaller batteries cheaper to produce, big reductions in charging time.

 

Just recently the announcement of a car model going into production with panels installed under the thin roof panel, batteries continuously being recharged in daylight time. 

 

I'm sure more clever innovations yet to come.

 

 

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5 hours ago, sandyf said:

It will be an evolving situation, much the same as other countries.

Last time I went to Malta about 6 years ago, the only EVs were in Valetta, most of the taxi ranks were EVs hooked up waiting for customers.

When I came back from LHR last year I had to get a PCR at the airport. A temporary facility had been set up on the perimeter road and to get to it I had to walk through a huge car park. That had been set up with a charging point on every slot specifically for taxis.

The bulk vehicle purchasers will get priority and the general public will be at the tail end of the project, if ever.

When I was up at Robinsons in Kamphaeng Phet last month they had 4 charging units. None were in use. The MG sales showroom also has a couple.

 

Probably they will not be used for a long time because KPP is a rural province and most EV owners would live locally and charge their EV at home.

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3 hours ago, scorecard said:

All very nice and overall better for the enviroment.

 

Seems to me there's a lot more to come with electric vehicle technology; already lighter smaller batteries cheaper to produce, big reductions in charging time.

 

Just recently the announcement of a car model going into production with panels installed under the thin roof panel, batteries continuously being recharged in daylight time. 

 

I'm sure more clever innovations yet to come.

 

 

But at what cost and who will pay?

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