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Anyone in Phnom Penh now? What's the outlook?


Sheryl
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Possibly the particular ATM you used had a cash shortage that day?

Try again at another location, should be fine.

And again, if you are here for any length of time, open a local bank account with a single wire transfer in. You'll save on fees in the long run, and have much higher ATM withdrawal limits and no ATM usage charge.

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Possibly the particular ATM you used had a cash shortage that day?

Try again at another location, should be fine.

And again, if you are here for any length of time, open a local bank account with a single wire transfer in. You'll save on fees in the long run, and have much higher ATM withdrawal limits and no ATM usage charge.

Many thanks Sheryl (and others) for the timely and accurate information on the current situation here. My travel has been issue free here having arrived in Phnom Penh 2 days ago. Talking to friends and locals here, low season is much lower than normal because of the rampant fear mongering taking place. Dan . ,

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I was there last week and things went back and forth. It's true the situation there can get ugly quickly but the protests are only in specific areas, stay away. Some roads are blocked as well but I walked most places. I think you will be ok, if things get crazy just enjoy the ride. Don't do the young backpacker thing going to protests and all. One more thing, my experience. People on the ground there tend blow things out of proportion.

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The violence usually happens after dark. Keep away from any roadblocks and demonstrations esp after dark and you'll most likely be fine. The city is about to empty out though due to major holiday (p'chum ben).

I don't think people on the ground there are "blowing things out of proportion". They are just reporting from a Cambodian (or resident expat involved in human rights/journalism etc) viewpoint which is quite different from a tourist/visitor one. No one has suggested it is unsafe to visit. But the problems (and the violence, land-grabbing, forced evictions etc) are very, very real as is the unprecedented levels of anger and discontent. It's not going to happen tomorrow, but over the long run things are going to get much worse before they get better. People who've lived there a long time, and the locals, have a better sense of what is coming than do visitors. But what is coming and what is here right now are diffferenet matters, especially for someone on a temporary visit with no interest in the political issues.

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That hardly has anything to do with the elections. Pchum Ben coming up; crime always increases before major holidays.

This.

Indeed, there is a lot of speculation that the shooting on Street 308 is intimately connected to the fact that the owner of the restaurant the American couple were leaving is owned by a guy called Luigi Saravino. His daughter, Charlene, was arrested at Phnom Penh airport last week with an Australian woman with two KG of heroin in their backpacks, attempting to take them to Australia. A Nigerian man was also arrested.

Some suspect that the shooting was an attempt to intimidate the restaurant owner to persuade his daughter not to speak too much.

Of course, that is pure speculation.

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That hardly has anything to do with the elections. Pchum Ben coming up; crime always increases before major holidays.

This.

Indeed, there is a lot of speculation that the shooting on Street 308 is intimately connected to the fact that the owner of the restaurant the American couple were leaving is owned by a guy called Luigi Saravino. His daughter, Charlene, was arrested at Phnom Penh airport last week with an Australian woman with two KG of heroin in their backpacks, attempting to take them to Australia. A Nigerian man was also arrested.

Some suspect that the shooting was an attempt to intimidate the restaurant owner to persuade his daughter not to speak too much.

Of course, that is pure speculation.

Still not political. Also pretty much debunked; this was a robbery gone bad......

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In Cambodia, which was included in annual“Freedom on the Net” survey(U.S.-based watchdog Freedom House)for the first time, a trend toward “digital democracy” is in danger of being reversed, the report warned.

Although new media and a growing generation of young people using social media has transformed the information landscape in Cambodia, the “tide may be turning,” the report said.

Since 2011 Cambodian authorities have blocked at least three Cambodian blogs known for politically sensitive content, and netizens fear a new draft cybercrime law could extend restrictions on traditional media online.

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