Jump to content

Phuket: Phoenix fails to rise


webfact

Recommended Posts

17 minutes ago, tirekicker said:

Do the chambers have a current test cert plus what Tables do they use.

If you want answer to off topic questions, check with them yourself.

Link to post
Share on other sites

On 8/30/2018 at 11:56 PM, MrLuckyThailand said:

In a country where logic still prevails over belief

Do you mean, "illogic over disbelief/unbelief"?

 

With many years of diving behind me, starting when in the Royal Navy, I have never seen or heard of using the equipment they are trying to raise the vessel with especially one with the dimensions we have been given.  

 

'nuf sed

Link to post
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, wotsdermatter said:

Do you mean, "illogic over disbelief/unbelief"?

 

With many years of diving behind me, starting when in the Royal Navy, I have never seen or heard of using the equipment they are trying to raise the vessel with especially one with the dimensions we have been given.  

 

'nuf sed

Nope, I mean exactly what I wrote.

On ‎8‎/‎31‎/‎2018 at 5:56 AM, MrLuckyThailand said:

In a country where logic still prevails over belief, the boat would be lifted to the skies by now.

In another country and with the use a logic instead of just believing something would work when it doesn´t. The boat had been lifted already.

Pretty much, same as you wrote in another way. ?

Link to post
Share on other sites

On 8/31/2018 at 11:41 AM, stevenl said:

They are trying to do it on the cheap.

 

If tomorrow it can't be raised as well, I have been told they are forced to give the order to a professional salvage company, which will of course mean that a much, much bigger part of the 10 mio budget will be used for the operation.

Looks like they have been given a few more days, the support boat is going to be at the wrecksite till the 4th.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to stick my oar in for another stroke, I cannot see how using just three oil drums, unless there are more that we are not aware of, could possibly raise such a vessel.  Also, the "diver" does not appear to have his tank attached to himself which is very dangerous for himself and any other diver(s) near him.  Would be interesting to know how deep he is and what is in his tank.

 

'nuf sed

Link to post
Share on other sites

42 minutes ago, wotsdermatter said:

Just to stick my oar in for another stroke, I cannot see how using just three oil drums, unless there are more that we are not aware of, could possibly raise such a vessel.  Also, the "diver" does not appear to have his tank attached to himself which is very dangerous for himself and any other diver(s) near him.  Would be interesting to know how deep he is and what is in his tank.

 

'nuf sed

They're diving on air.

The diver on the photo is taking an airtank down for the guys doing the work, he is a support diver, with his own tank on his back.

Yes, there is much more lift, but personally I doubt there will be enough, the ship is already half buried in the sand.

 

I think this should have been left to professionals.

Link to post
Share on other sites

12 hours ago, stevenl said:

They're diving on air.

The diver on the photo is taking an airtank down for the guys doing the work, he is a support diver, with his own tank on his back.

Yes, there is much more lift, but personally I doubt there will be enough, the ship is already half buried in the sand.

 

I think this should have been left to professionals.

The diver is breathing from the tank he has strung not the one on his back. Diving on air at 45 metres gives you a very short bottom time, not enough to do any useful work.  Is the diver doing a deco stop needing two tanks to complete it ?

 

Are they using the sea gypsies to do the lift ?

Link to post
Share on other sites

36 minutes ago, Soupdragon said:

The diver is breathing from the tank he has strung not the one on his back. Diving on air at 45 metres gives you a very short bottom time, not enough to do any useful work.  Is the diver doing a deco stop needing two tanks to complete it ?

 

Are they using the sea gypsies to do the lift ?

45 meters = 146 ' to be safe I would work a 160-foot table.962348459_USNavytables..thumb.jpg.6cd02f17cc1e0f696ca5b70365f1e2d8.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, tirekicker said:

45 meters = 146 ' to be safe I would work a 160-foot table.962348459_USNavytables..thumb.jpg.6cd02f17cc1e0f696ca5b70365f1e2d8.jpg

You can stick to tables, nobody does that anymore.

 

And yes, what they're doing is IMO very unsafe.

Link to post
Share on other sites

17 minutes ago, stevenl said:

You can stick to tables, nobody does that anymore.

 

And yes, what they're doing is IMO very unsafe.

16 minutes ago, stevenl said:

You can stick to tables, nobody does that anymore.

 

And yes, what they're doing is IMO very unsafe.

"You can stick to tables, nobody does that anymore" ......? then they must be using a Repetitive Dive Group system for which they will still need Dive Tables.

Link to post
Share on other sites

On 9/4/2018 at 10:59 PM, stevenl said:

They're diving on air.

The diver on the photo is taking an airtank down for the guys doing the work, he is a support diver, with his own tank on his back.

Yes, there is much more lift, but personally I doubt there will be enough, the ship is already half buried in the sand.

 

I think this should have been left to professionals.

 

"the ship is already half buried in the sand." - "I think this should have been left to professionals." - I agree.  The professionals would have at least had shovels to dig out the sand.  ?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I would like to ask the question as a non-commercial or professionel diver, what sort of bottom time are they working and if decompression is needed after working at 45 meters? 

Link to post
Share on other sites

15 hours ago, NamKangMan said:

 

"the ship is already half buried in the sand." - "I think this should have been left to professionals." - I agree.  The professionals would have at least had shovels to dig out the sand.  ?

Professional would have used an airlift to remove the sand but a decent sized compressor on the surface would be required. They would also be using Surface Demand.......but like your humour?

Link to post
Share on other sites

On 9/1/2018 at 9:50 AM, stevenl said:

International, BPH and Vachira have decompression chambers. Don't think the new hospital will have one.

Just heard that the new hospital will have a decompression chamber.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Why not just fill it with ping pong balls. 

  First block all the places they can see or find that will leak the ping pong balls. As the balls fill the boat and the balls replace the water have divers prepared to block any places they missed where the balls can escape. I once hear that is how they used to raise J24's after sinking. 

  But personally I think it is destined to be a man made reef.

Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, huuwi said:

are there any news about this.

is up or still on the ground.

Still there.

 

It it wasn't so pathetic it would be laughable.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The divers have been told they have 2 more days, today and tomorrow, to try and lift her. There is a tugboat, a barge and the assist boat on site now. If no lift tomorrow payments will stop is what they were told.

 

Wait and see.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...