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Typhoon Mangkhut = Typhoon Mangosteen?


AbeSurd

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3 minutes ago, digbeth said:

Thailand gets to name it this time

Really? All I know is the UK news media are spelling and pronouncing it 'Mangkhut'. And that sure looks like mangosteen in Thai.

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38 minutes ago, Briggsy said:

Interesting, thanks. Thais seem to like naming disasters after food. A Thai teacher once told me Thais call the financial crash of 1997 the 'Tom Yam Gung' (ต้มยำกุ้ง) financial crash.

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Just now, AbeSurd said:

Interesting, thanks. Thais seem to like naming disasters after food. A Thai teacher once told me Thais call the financial crash of 1997 the 'Tom Yam Gung' (ต้มยำกุ้ง) financial crash.

Not only disasters. The nickname of the policeman in the news nearly every day at the moment is Big Joke.

Joke in Thai is congee soup, rice with pork meatballs and an egg.

joke soup.jpg

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On 9/17/2018 at 1:47 AM, AbeSurd said:

Interesting, thanks. Thais seem to like naming disasters after food. A Thai teacher once told me Thais call the financial crash of 1997 the 'Tom Yam Gung' (ต้มยำกุ้ง) financial crash.

The American 2008 Sub-Prime crash was also called 'Hamburger Financial Crash' by the Thais also

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5 hours ago, digbeth said:

The American 2008 Sub-Prime crash was also called 'Hamburger Financial Crash' by the Thais also

Do you know what Thai word/phrase was used for 'financial crash'? The same Thai teacher who told me about the "Tom Yam Gung" crash told me it was a Thai word like "ferd" or "fud" (sorry, I didn't note down how it was written in Thai). She told me "ferd/fud" meant "jam" or "block", but I've never been able to find this word in a dictionary.

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ฝืด Fued is friction

เศรษกิจฝืดเคือง  economy in a slowdown

 

เฟ้อ is bloated/increase

เงินเฟ้อ inflation

ท้องเฟ้อ bloated stomach

 

 

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5 hours ago, digbeth said:

ฝืด Fued is friction

เศรษกิจฝืดเคือง  economy in a slowdown

 

เฟ้อ is bloated/increase

เงินเฟ้อ inflation

ท้องเฟ้อ bloated stomach

 

 

Thank you! Thanks to your help, after eleven years I've now been able to find ฝืด (ferd) in my dictionary.

I’ve also checked my school notes (no Thai script, only transliteration). So I think my teacher suggested เงิน ฝืด (ngun ferd) as in เงิน ฝืด ต้ม ยำ กุ้ง (ngun ferd tom yam gung) for the 1997 financial crash. My dictionary translates เงิน ฝืด as ‘deflation’, though literally I suppose it’s something like ‘stuck money’.

So for the 2008 crash, would you render it as เงิน ฝืด แฮมเบอร์เกอร์ (ngun ferd hamburger)?

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11 hours ago, digbeth said:

วิกฤต for crisis

วิกฤตต้มยำกุ้ง was how the 97 crash was known

you can google hamburgur crisis too

Thinking about it, over time such events get called different things. At least in the UK, in the early days of the 2008 financial crisis/crash, it was called the 'credit crunch'. 'Crunch' is quite close to friction/jam/stuck.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 9/17/2018 at 12:49 AM, bannork said:

Not only disasters. The nickname of the policeman in the news nearly every day at the moment is Big Joke.

Joke in Thai is congee soup, rice with pork meatballs and an egg.

joke soup.jpg

I've been struggling to understand this ever since you posted it. Now I can see from an English language news item that you're referring to "Maj-Gen Surachate Hakpan - famous for his high profile crime busting and known in the media as Big Joke". I also see from my dictionary that โจ็ก can mean congee (rice porridge) - as in your picture. Or โจ็ก can indeed be used as a Thai slang noun to mean 'joke'. But this doesn't get me much further. How is his nickname written in Thai?

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54 minutes ago, AbeSurd said:

I've been struggling to understand this ever since you posted it. Now I can see from an English language news item that you're referring to "Maj-Gen Surachate Hakpan - famous for his high profile crime busting and known in the media as Big Joke". I also see from my dictionary that โจ็ก can mean congee (rice porridge) - as in your picture. Or โจ็ก can indeed be used as a Thai slang noun to mean 'joke'. But this doesn't get me much further. How is his nickname written in Thai?

บิ๊กโจ็ก a Thai friend surmised he originally got the nickname โจ็ก because of his love for rice soup then when he rose through the ranks to deputy head, he acquired the บิ็ก big, i.e. senior, powerful. Quite a few figures in uniform acquire big in front of their nickname to show their power. 

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1 hour ago, bannork said:

บิ๊กโจ็ก a Thai friend surmised he originally got the nickname โจ็ก because of his love for rice soup then when he rose through the ranks to deputy head, he acquired the บิ็ก big, i.e. senior, powerful. Quite a few figures in uniform acquire big in front of their nickname to show their power. 

Thanks. Interesting for me to note that here the adjective precedes the noun. I'm guessing this positioning is because บิ๊ก is derived straight from English.

So should I assume that all or most Thais would appreciate that there is a play on words here, ie 'Big Joke' (as in 'very funny') and 'Big Joke' (presumably as in 'big bowl of congee')?

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On 9/27/2018 at 9:49 PM, AbeSurd said:

Thanks. Interesting for me to note that here the adjective precedes the noun. I'm guessing this positioning is because บิ๊ก is derived straight from English.

So should I assume that all or most Thais would appreciate that there is a play on words here, ie 'Big Joke' (as in 'very funny') and 'Big Joke' (presumably as in 'big bowl of congee')?

Hes called after than instant packet Porridge muck branded JOKE..Dumb PC ferangs wet their panties over Minister Chavalit being called  a BIG JEW, To Thais its Big Glasses.The lists endless.

 

 

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1 hour ago, HAKAPALITA said:

Hes called after than instant packet Porridge muck branded JOKE..Dumb PC ferangs wet their panties over Minister Chavalit being called  a BIG JEW, To Thais its Big Glasses.The lists endless.

 

 

 

Wow, you managed to collect so many misinformation

 

โจ๊ก is chinese rice porridge not a brand

บิ๊ก gets put in front of nicknames of people in armed forces who'd made it big, including the police

บิ๊กจิ๋ว for Chavalit.. จิ๋ว actually means little, small nothing todo with glass, drinking or spectacle

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14 minutes ago, digbeth said:

 

Wow, you managed to collect so many misinformation

 

โจ๊ก is chinese rice porridge not a brand

บิ๊ก gets put in front of nicknames of people in armed forces who'd made it big, including the police

บิ๊กจิ๋ว for Chavalit.. จิ๋ว actually means little, small nothing todo with glass, drinking or spectacle

 

So his nickname means 'Big Tiny'. That's pretty funny 😁

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6 hours ago, digbeth said:

 

Wow, you managed to collect so many misinformation

 

โจ๊ก is chinese rice porridge not a brand

บิ๊ก gets put in front of nicknames of people in armed forces who'd made it big, including the police

บิ๊กจิ๋ว for Chavalit.. จิ๋ว actually means little, small nothing todo with glass, drinking or spectacle

How long you been here, sorry but you sound like a Newb, or a Teacher copying from a book. what i posted is Street Thai, using Thai Script in posts shows little understanding generally.Guess you young too. And we all expect an "Im Not"reply as well.:partytime2:

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14 hours ago, HAKAPALITA said:

How long you been here, sorry but you sound like a Newb, or a Teacher copying from a book. what i posted is Street Thai, using Thai Script in posts shows little understanding generally.Guess you young too. And we all expect an "Im Not"reply as well.:partytime2:

 

How long I've been here or how old/young I am has no bearing on the fact,

 

Do you stand by that

 

'Joke' is a *Brand* of porridge? 

 

And 'Big Jew' in Thai means big glasses?

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How long you been here, sorry but you sound like a Newb, or a Teacher copying from a book. what i posted is Street Thai, using Thai Script in posts shows little understanding generally.Guess you young too. And we all expect an "Im Not"reply as well.:partytime2:

Your criticism is uncalled for in my opinion. How can what you posted be 'Street Thai' If a Thai can't read it?



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On 9/27/2018 at 9:49 PM, AbeSurd said:

Thanks. Interesting for me to note that here the adjective precedes the noun. I'm guessing this positioning is because บิ๊ก is derived straight from English.

So should I assume that all or most Thais would appreciate that there is a play on words here, ie 'Big Joke' (as in 'very funny') and 'Big Joke' (presumably as in 'big bowl of congee')?

It's a title and they always precede the name. 

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10 minutes ago, bannork said:

It's a title and they always precede the name. 

You're suggesting บิ๊ก is being used as a noun rather than an adjective? Colossus Rice Porridge rather than Colossal Rice Porridge? Monument Rice Porridge rather than Monumental Rice Porridge?

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