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Floods ease in eight N and NE provinces, but 16 others remain flooded


webfact

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Floods ease in eight N and NE provinces, but 16 others remain flooded

 

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Flooding in eight northern and northeastern provinces has eased, with water levels steadily receding. Meanwhile, 16 other provinces remain flooded, said government spokeswoman Mrs. Narumon Pinyosinwat on Sunday.

 

She noted that, while many provinces in the North and Northeast were awash with water delivered by storm Podul, 13 provinces, mostly in the lower northeastern and northern regions, remain dry and short of water.

 

The Friendship Highway, two kilometres of which had been heavily flooded from Kiatsin to Ban Keong intersections in Ban Phai district of Khon Kaen for the past few days, is now open as normal.

 

Full story: https://www.thaipbsworld.com/floods-ease-in-eight-n-and-ne-provinces-but-16-others-remain-flooded/

 

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Does this mean the drought is over?

2 hours ago, webfact said:

She noted that, while many provinces in the North and Northeast were awash with water delivered by storm Podul, 13 provinces, mostly in the lower northeastern and northern regions, remain dry and short of water.

Apparently not. It would seem the storm did not get the memo from Uncle Too as to where it should go.

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I always wonder what the statistics about water in the dams really mean - 40 billion cu/m vs 16 billion cu/m usable?

 

Does that mean that, actually, the dams have 40 billion capacity but over half of that is taken up with mud & rubbish? Which, if true, would suggest that maintenance is not a strength (surprise! surprise!).

 

 

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Why doesn't Thailand build a network of canals that link all areas to catch the flood water & run-off from storms... then move it around to where it's needed via pumping stations...

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2 hours ago, mfd101 said:

I always wonder what the statistics about water in the dams really mean - 40 billion cu/m vs 16 billion cu/m usable?

 

Does that mean that, actually, the dams have 40 billion capacity but over half of that is taken up with mud & rubbish? Which, if true, would suggest that maintenance is not a strength (surprise! surprise!).

 

 

Had you taken the trouble to read up on issues pertaining to the silting up of reservoirs, which is an international problem, you might just have resisted the urge to type this cheap and unnecessary Thai bash.

 

https://www.internationalrivers.org/sedimentation-problems-with-dams

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I have a friend near Ubon!

Pictures she sent me are devastating! 

It happens year...after year...after year....

One should assume, someone might try to come up with a better solution then " let it all flood and go to hell, so someone can ship in some packages of expired mama and fish- cans, with a nice picture of the gracious donors!

 

But then again...TIT!

 

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1 hour ago, Moonlover said:

Had you taken the trouble to read up on issues pertaining to the silting up of reservoirs, which is an international problem, you might just have resisted the urge to type this cheap and unnecessary Thai bash.

Also there seems to be a minimum filling that must not be fallen below without endangering the stability?

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1 minute ago, KhunBENQ said:

Also there seems to be a minimum filling that must not be fallen below without endangering the stability?

Yes there is. A calculation is made during the design stage to determine how much water to leave undisturbed at the bottom to minimise the amount of silted water from leaving the reservoir. But it's not an exact science and they rarely get it right, anywhere.

 

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3 hours ago, Moonlover said:

Had you taken the trouble to read up on issues pertaining to the silting up of reservoirs, which is an international problem, you might just have resisted the urge to type this cheap and unnecessary Thai bash.

 

https://www.internationalrivers.org/sedimentation-problems-with-dams

It makes a pretty gloomy read! And no suggestion of anything anyone can do about it other than plant trees to stop soil erosion.

 

What about dredging? Is that not a possibility in many cases? Obviously would need to be a permanent activity in cases where silting up is rapid ...

 

I still find it hard to believe that, across all of Thailand's dams, a ratio of 40 capacity to 17 usable is normal.

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On 9/2/2019 at 11:13 AM, hotchilli said:

Why doesn't Thailand build a network of canals that link all areas to catch the flood water & run-off from storms... then move it around to where it's needed via pumping stations...

Cost.

 

It's cheaper to let the serfs suffer annually. Wealthier types who might influence such decisions do not attempt to live in flood plains

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