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Snacks – what’s good (and what’s not) for your child is good for you!


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Snacks – what’s good (and what’s not) for your child is good for you!

by Gale Ruttanaphon

 

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We all aim to eat well and follow a healthy diet. Having healthy snacks can keep you satisfied, provide the energy you need to keep going, and help prevent ravenous hunger so you don’t overeat later on. The more you plan ahead, the easier it is to stick to a healthy diet. After all, isn’t this why we mums pre-pack healthy snacks for our children? Along the way though, after we’ve given birth and the baby is no longer a part of our body, we seem to forget that tight association between how we care for ourselves and how we care for our children’s health. In the past, I used to send my daughter to school with a nicely prepared, healthy snack box, whilst I ravenously gobbled up banana bread for breakfast on the way to work. Why is it that as mums we often shortchange and deny ourselves all the good things we do for our kids? A healthy diet, healthy snacks, and the importance of pre-planning are just as crucial for you, as it is for your child. Preparing healthy snacks ahead of time doesn’t have to be a complicated affair. You don’t need to pack a separate box for you and your child. Whatever is good for you is good for your child and vice versa. Here is a list of things I keep in mind when I pack snacks for my family. Smart snack guidelines: Pick appropriate snacks to suit your needs: Of all the macronutrients that you consume, your body can digest carbohydrates the fastest, followed by protein and then fat. Knowing this fact can help you plan ahead and choose appropriate snacks for you and your little ones.

 

When to reach for carbohydrates: As carbohydrate is digested faster than protein and fat, it can provide you with a fast energy boost to overcome your mid-afternoon slump. Carbohydrates have developed a bit of a bad rap recently, but do you know that carbohydrates are your body’s preferred source of energy? However, not all carbohydrates are created equal. Simple carbohydrates, common snacks I see at school, like baked treats, juices or breakfast cereal, will give a short term energy spike follow by a subsequent crash. To get a steadier energy lift, reach for complex carbohydrates snacks like fresh fruit, granola bars, or homemade trail mix.

 

Full Story: https://expatlifeinthailand.com/health-and-beauty/snacks-whats-good-and-whats-not-for-your-child-is-good-for-you/

 

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