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Chkdsk Utility


Neeranam

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click start

then run

type cmd and enter

then at the command prompt type chkdsk and the drive you want to check, if its the system drive it will say iys mounted, just tell it to do a check when it reboots next instead of unmounting the drives

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baz, you beat me to it.

A faster way to open up a command prompt is to hold down your windows key and hit r. Type in cmd and hit enter.....interestingly on my work laptop (Windows XP Pro) I didn't include the drive thinking that it would give me a list of arguments to supplement the command-that's what would have happened in Linux-but rather happily started on the C: drive.

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Thanks for the replies but I'm still none the wiser.

When I do as suggested, I get a little black screen with C:documents and settings/user

It's the D drive that needs checking - how do I do this?

What;s an argument?

Arguments are additional 'switches' that provide a command with specific instructions. In your case I'd recommend issuing this from your command line:

chkdsk volume D: /R
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Arguments are additional 'switches' that provide a command with specific instructions. In your case I'd recommend issuing this from your command line:

QUOTE

chkdsk volume D: /R

It says invalid parameter D

You can type chkdsk /? to get the list of options. It should be chkdsk D: /R with a colon after D. Full details below.

CHKDSK [volume[[path]filename]]] [/F] [/V] [/R] [/X] [/i] [/C] [/L[:size]]

volume Specifies the drive letter (followed by a colon), mount point, or volume name.

filename FAT/FAT32 only: Specifies the files to check for fragmentation.

/F Fixes errors on the disk.

/V On FAT/FAT32: Displays the full path and name of every file on the disk.

On NTFS: Displays cleanup messages if any.

/R Locates bad sectors and recovers readable information (implies /F).

/L:size NTFS only: Changes the log file size to the specified number of kilobytes. If size is not specified, displays current size.

/X Forces the volume to dismount first if necessary. All opened handles to the volume would then be invalid (implies /F).

/I NTFS only: Performs a less vigorous check of index entries.

/C NTFS only: Skips checking of cycles within the folder structure.

The /I or /C switch reduces the amount of time required to run Chkdsk by

skipping certain checks of the volume.

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Or, use the graphical interface way...

Right click on a drive in "My Computer", select "Properties", "Tools" tab, "Check Now..." button...

Then select the Check disk options:

gallery_35489_952_122856.jpg

Edited by JetsetBkk
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Actually, I can't do it.

It says I must restart the computer but when I do it sticks at 'chckdsk' when 13 % completed.

Does anyone know how I can solve this?

Cheers

NN

Can I ask how long did you leave it displaying 13% before deciding it was "stuck"?

The reason being, chkdsk can quickly get up to a particular value, e.g. 13%, because it has little work to do with that first 13% of the disk. But it then may take quite a while (10 or 20 minutes) before it displays the next value, simply because it's very busy.

Did you notice if the disk activity light - usually a small LED somewhere - was flickering, showing the disk was active?

And can you say which disk it was that you wanted checking - the C: drive or another?

Edited by JetsetBkk
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