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Declare Your Marriage To Your Embassy?.


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I would like to know the real reason why I should make recognize a marriage to my "home" embassy when the country where I intend to live is not my home country.

I want move to the USA, and want get married to a thai lady in Thailand. What' s the point to recognize my marriage when I don't intend to go back to Switzerland...

I would anderstand if I was moving back to my home country and we need a visa for the wife. But this is not the case.

Do you guys go back to the UK embassy to bring your marriage certificate? can you not just get married in Thailand, and that's all?

I want to avoid to do useless paperwork with my embassy.Still I have to pickup the "freedom to marry"piece of paper for 5000 bahts.Once married in Thailand, I have to show the certificate to the US embassy.

marriage is something personal, government don't have to put their nose in your business as long your respect monogamy.

Edited by swisstouristpattaya
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Obviously, if a foreigner marrying in Thailand one does have to go to one's embassy for the affirmation of freedom to marry as this is a requirement of Thai law. What contact one has with one's embassy following the marriage depends, I suppose, on the law and requirements of one's native land

As far as the UK is concerned, the embassy offers a service whereby a couple, if at least one of them is British, can lodge a copy of their Thai marriage certificate with the General Records Office in the UK. Doing this is not compulsory and confers no extra rights or privileges on the couple over those who have not done so. The only advantage is if at some time in the future one is in the UK and requires a copy of the certificate, it can be obtained from the GRO. Most don't bother.

There is no legal requirement to inform the British embassy of the marriage at all, if one does not wish to do so.

What the situation is for Switzerland and all other countries, I can't say.

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so I can just get married in thailand, go to the US embassy to pickup our visa, and move to the USA?

and if later I want inform the swiss government we are married(in case we wish to go to switzerland for visit), we can simply inform the Swiss Embassy in the USA to get a tourist visa for her?

Still I don't understand what is this "freedom to marry", why they ask this piece of paper? this is to avoid polygamy?

Edited by swisstouristpattaya
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Yes it's to avoid polygamy.

If two Thai people marry, officially in the Amphur, they have access to their records which would show if they have been married previously.

As a foreigner, they do not have access to your records, so they need the affirmation. The wording of which has been agreed between the Thai government and all the embassies.

As 7by7 says, for UK nationals there is no requirement to inform our government of the marriage. Simply put, they do not care! :lol:

It has no tax implications for us anymore. there used to be something called the 'married man's tax allowance' but nowadays everyone is taxed as individuals.

As for what you're required to tell your government after you get married, I'm not sure.

Ask them :)

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so I can just get married in thailand, go to the US embassy to pickup our visa, and move to the USA?

If I were you, I would just get married in Thailand and stay there with my wife. Why would you want to move to the US? What do you expect there? It is getting more tougher every day to make a living.

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so I can just get married in thailand, go to the US embassy to pickup our visa, and move to the USA?

If I were you, I would just get married in Thailand and stay there with my wife. Why would you want to move to the US? What do you expect there? It is getting more tougher every day to make a living.

The OP won a state registered lottery for a Green Card, that is why he is going to the US.

The Affirmation to Marry is a sworn statement to the Thai Government that you are free to Marry a Thai national. After marrying you do not have to inform any Embassy that you are married if you do not want to, I never did. It is not a legal obligation.

Do you have a job lined up in the US?

Remember you might have won the chance of a Green Card but even then it might not be issued to you. There are 100,000 winners but only 55,000 Green cards available.

Edited by beano2274
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Normally no obligation to register it, although it can make things easier if you need to proof that you are married, but that depends on your personal circumstances.

If you want to move to antoher country, it is advisable to get a copy of the wedding certificate legalised by the Thai Foreign Ministry and your embassy, in case you ever need to proof that you are married. It is not the same as registering your marriage in your home country.

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All you do is after getting the affirmation to marry done and certified at the MFA, you get married, take the Marriage Certificate, (you could get it translated into English if you want to), and go to the US Embassy with your applications, no need to go near the Swiss Embassy.

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All you do is after getting the affirmation to marry done and certified at the MFA, you get married, take the Marriage Certificate, (you could get it translated into English if you want to), and go to the US Embassy with your applications, no need to go near the Swiss Embassy.

The U.S. Immigrant Visa process is a bit complicated so recommend you check the Embassy's www site for details, such as which Lottery Year you "won," and note the deadline for the 2011 winners.

Note: The U.S. Embassy DOES NOT accept a copy of a Thai marriage certificate and DOES NOT "register" Thai marriages in any database.

Mac

http://bangkok.usembassy.gov/immigrant_visas.html

http://bangkok.usembassy.gov/immigrant_visas/diversity-visa-lottery.html

http://travel.state.gov/visa/immigrants/types/types_1322.html

Lottery Selectee Notification and Next Steps

DV Program 2011: Selectees for the DV-2011 lottery were notified by mail between May and July of 2010. For successful DV 2011 entrants, the diversity immigrant visa application process is underway, which must be completed and visas issued by September 30, 2011.

DV Program 2012: Review the information about Entry Status Check which is the ONLY means by which DV lottery winners/selectees will be notified of their selection for DV-2012. Additionally, Entry Status Check will provide successful selectees instructions on how to proceed with their application, and also notify you of the date and time of your immigrant visa appointment. The Kentucky Consular Center no longer mails notification letters and does not use email to notify DV entrants of their selection in the DV lottery. Review the DV Lottery 2012 Instructions "Selection of Applicants" section, which provides information about the DV process.

For All Successful DV Entrants: If you have been selected for further processing in the Diversity Visa program, after you receive instructions, you will need to demonstrate you are eligible for a diversity immigrant visa by successfully completing the next steps. When requested to do so by the Kentucky Consular Center, you will need to complete the immigrant visa application, submit required documents and forms, pay required fees, complete a medical examination, and be interviewed by a consular officer at the U.S. embassy or consulate to demonstrate you qualify for a diversity visa. Please note that the Kentucky Consular Center will provide application information either by mail (for DV-2011 selectees) or online through the Entry Status Check on the E-DV website www.dvlottery.state.gov (for DV-2012 selectees).

Qualifying Occupations

Successful DV entrants must be eligible to receive a visa by qualifying based on education, work, and other requirements. The law and regulations require that every DV entrant must have at least:

A high school education or its equivalent; or

Two years of work experience within the past five years in an occupation requiring at least two years' training or experience.

To learn more about qualifying occupations, see the Diversity Visa Instructions Frequently Asked Questions and the List of Occupations webpage.

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