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Thaksin And Red Shirts Not Doing Yingluck Any Favours


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SHINAWATRA GOVERNMENT

Thaksin and red shirts not doing Yingluck any favours

By The Nation

Thaksin Shinawatra has put off his plan to visit Cambodia. However, that could be too little too late to smooth the Yingluck government's bumpy start.

As expected, the ousted PM has dominated perception that the local and international communities have of his sister's administration. But Thaksin is not the only big problem Yingluck Shinawatra faces. Her government's association with the red-shirt movement has also begun to spoil the honeymoon period that new leaders usually enjoy.

To sum it up, Yingluck's assets are becoming liabilities. She came to power on the strength of her brother's unwavering popularity, with the red shirts as her political base. But now she has power, both her brother and the red shirts are demanding their due.

A parade of red-shirt figures have taken up official political posts. Although Yingluck managed to keep them out of her Cabinet, there is no escaping them when it comes to other political positions such as ministers' secretaries.

Aree Krainara, former head of the red-shirt guards, was appointed secretary to the interior minister. Yoswarit Chooklom, aka Jeng Dokjik, who was a red-shirt leader, was appointed assistant to the interior minister's secretary. Chinnawat Haboonpad, host and founder of the red shirts' community radio, was appointed an adviser to the deputy transport minister. Former MP Prasang Mongkolsiri was appointed an adviser to the education minister. Somwang Asrasi, a sponsor of red-shirt rallies, was appointed an adviser to the commerce minister.

Meanwhile, Paijit Aksornnarong, Thanakrit Cha-emnoi (also known as Wanchana Kerddee), Weera Choosathan, Chavarat Urasayanan, Rangsee Serichaijaimoong, Pol Colonel Sa-ngiem Samranrat, Pipatchai (aka Somchai) Paiboon, Worawut Wichaidit and Atthachai Anantamek were appointed as officers attached to the Secretariat of the Prime Minister.

The rise of the red shirts has dominated weekend news, whereas front pages and commentaries should have been focused on cheaper petrol prices. The Oil Fund measures of the Yingluck government are controversial, but undoubtedly appealing to motorists who want cheaper petrol. Negative news about Thaksin and the red shirts has taken much of the gloss off the government's first bold economic step.

Red-shirt leader Kokaew Pikulthong, now a Pheu Thai party-list MP, said Yingluck's decision to appoint the red shirts for political positions was already expected as the red shirt movement had helped Pheu Thai. The appointments were thus Yingluck's thanks to red shirt leaders, in a way.

Kokaew said he believed Yingluck wanted to appoint some red shirt leaders as ministers. But she baulked because of the tense political situation and moves to help the country achieve reconciliation.

Yingluck endured the policy declaration to Parliament last week. Thaksin essentially gave ammunition to the opposition and made life unnecessarily difficult by flying to Japan to talk about democracy and his economic vision.

To make matters worse, some red-shirts generated bad publicity by intimidating activists and journalists who don't share their political views.

It's difficult to say if Thaksin realises that he was pushing too hard. His decision to stay away from Cambodia now is good news. The bad news is it's now rumoured that he wants to visit the United Kingdom. Such a trip would require further help from his sister's government.

The red shirts, meanwhile, have yet to demonstrate any understanding that things have changed. In their actions and comments, the red shirts are still resentful political victims. Whether that is true or not, a change of strategy may be required. Like Thaksin, the red shirts may be pushing Yingluck too hard and doing her more harm than good.

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-- The Nation 2011-08-30

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there's not much she can do to avoid thaksin being dragged into everything

i doubt she's had an interview yet where she hasn't been questioned about him but this is what she signed up for

i'd say she's sick to death of hearing the name 'thaksin'...kinda like me tbh

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It must be said that the words " subtle" and " discrete" don't appear to be in Thaksin or the Red Shirts vocabulary. "Bull in a china shop" springs to mind. The sensible option would be to sit back and let folks get used to Yingluk and her team, let the opposition make constructive criticism of her policies ( or lack thereof) , let her throw out a few bones to the people to smooth the way for Thaksin's inevitable return and then let the Red Shirts get their slice of the cake.

Instead all we get is " Thaksin wants to visit Greenland" or " Red Shirt DJ Sombat Yetkwai, who advocated the burning of the Sakorn Nakorn branch of 7-11 in last year's troubles, is made Deputy Minister for Somtam "

For somebody as astute as Thaksin in some matters other times he does appear thick as a hedge.

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The appointments were thus Yingluck's thanks to red shirt leaders

http://i1124.photobucket.com/albums/l570/rightie1/820183.jpg

Secretary to the Interior Minister and former Head of Red Shirt Guards, Aree Krainara

Assistant Secretary to the Interior Minister and former Red Shirt Leader Yoswarit Chooklom, is free on 1.6 Million Baht bail and is facing terrorism and LM charges.

http://i1124.photobucket.com/albums/l570/rightie1/9dbe471a.jpg

Adviser to the Deputy Transport Minister and founder/host of Red Shirt Radio Shinnawat Haboonpad

http://i1124.photobucket.com/albums/l570/rightie1/Picture545.jpg

Adviser to the Commerce Minister and Red Shirt Rally Sponsor and Red Shirt Accounting Supervisor Somwang Asrasi (above left)

and more...

Paijit Aksornnarong, Thanakrit Cha-emnoi (also known as Wanchana Kerddee), Weera Choosathan, Chavarat Urasayanan, Rangsee Serichaijaimoong, Pol Colonel Sa-ngiem Samranrat, Pipatchai (aka Somchai) Paiboon, Worawut Wichaidit and Atthachai Anantamek were appointed as officers attached to the Secretariat of the Prime Minister.

.

Edited by Buchholz
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