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Japanese vs Thai food - which do you like better and why?


Poppy39

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Whenever I eat at a Japanese/Thai restaurant, I always have a hard time choosing which type of food I want. Japanese cuisine has great rolls with spicy mayo, but Thai cuisine has great noodle dishes and curry. Which do you like and why?

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I want descent prepared food. Not that lazy raw fish stuff; even the Thai food is more becoming.

Japanese are harakiri, so let them eat all the raw stuff.

yep, I know....Thai die from eating raw pork.

Some people don't use condoms when they ....

Have it your way, I am fine with it and I have my way.

tongue.png

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Generally speaking, I think Thai food just edges it for me, although sushi is one of my most favourite things to eat.

When I was in Japan, as you'd expect, the sushi, sashimi and tempora were excellent but there was also a lot of stuff I wasn't so keen on. There seemed to be a lot of cold pickled stuff, which I didn't like.

As I said, I think day to day, your pad kapow, massaman, tom yum etc just shade but.

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First of all, let me tell to those who give the immens stupid reply that they don't like raw food and therefore not eat Japanese, they probably never ate in a Japanese restaurant.

MOST food is cooked in Japan or has some form of treatment. Very little is uncooked. The Dutch eat haring, also raw! So now you can't eat Dutch food? (Besides the fact that the "Dutch Cuisine" isn't that great - I know, because I'm Dutch).

There is also a difference between Japanese food in Thailand or in Japan. In Japan the food is fresh and made out of good ingredients. Here in Thailand, I doubt it. Here in Thailand, many Japanese cold food, like sushi, sashimi or onigiri is nearly always prepared with mayonaise. I haven't had any food in Japan with mayonaise except for okonomiyaki (Japanese pizza).

I love Thai food, but from time to time I eat Japanese. I used to travel to Japan nearly every month and loved the food there too.

In the place where I live I can get onigiri (Japanese riceball - a kind of sandwich made with rice, seaweed and a filling) and I buy it once a week if I can. They taste nice, but not to compare with the ones I ate in Japan.

So: in general I eat Thai food and about once a week Japanese....

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Yeah, I like all types of Asian food. I prefer Thai food to Japanese food, but then Japanese is my least favorite Asian food. I prefer Vietnamese food, then Chinese food, Indian food, Thai food, Korean food, Indonesian food, Malaysian food, and yes, even Filipino food better than Japanese food. However, at least half my meals are Western food.

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I want descent prepared food. Not that lazy raw fish stuff; even the Thai food is more becoming.

Japanese are harakiri, so let them eat all the raw stuff.

yep, I know....Thai die from eating raw pork.

Some people don't use condoms when they ....

Have it your way, I am fine with it and I have my way.

tongue.png

Well, my ancestors are all dead, I do not parachute or bungy jump, and I will not slice my belly, but I do tend to agree that the raw fish number is less than appetizing. However, as some of you have mentioned, the so-called Japanese food here is not nearly as fresh as in Japan. Fresh and raw may equate to tolerable. For example, raw oyster shooters are a favorite.

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Thai food is much better because of the flavours. I hate Japanese food (too much fish), but it's not as bad as Korean food - the worst 'cuisine' in the world. Rice, kimchie, a fried, un-gutted fish and soup made from something that used to live under a rock on the beach... for every single meal: breakfast, lunch & dinner. It all tastes the same... and everything is slathered in gochu-jang (hot, bitter red pepper paste).

Edited by cruisemonkey
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The first Japanese dish I learned was Omi Rice. Japanese fried rice with a omelet on top and catsup on top of that. I was 17 years old and had it at Satchikos Restaurant in Kin Okinawa. I'm 70 now and still make it often. I make Japanese curry which is another one I make often. A dish I learned from Okinawan laborers is Spam fried with soy sauce and sugar and a few vegies on a bed of rice and carried in an aluminum lunch container. There are a number of other dishes I make from my time in Japan and Okinawa.

Of course with a Thai wife, I eat a lot of Thai dishes with lots of noodles. Lad naa Moo, goong and gai are some of my favorites.

My Thai family is always anxious to see us come to Thailand because I cook a lot of fusion dishes which they all love. Also my American family loves my wife's cooking. (She is a Thai Chef trained at one of the best schools in Bangkok)

We live and eat well.

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I like the taste of both.

I'd give the edge to Jap food because their food can be readily eaten.

Thai food on the other hand can be difficult to eat, although I like the taste of most Thai dishes.

But I don't like fishbones, cartilage, tendons, hard meat, wood-like vegetables, animal skin with feathers or bristle attached, seafood barbequed with the shell on, etc. when these are included in Thai dishes, my enjoyment of it is seriously diminished.

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I start off with a smoked salmon salad and then Wagyu beef steak or scallops to start and then teriyaki salmon or chicken. I like Japanese steak houses and BBQ restaurants. Raw sushi is only a small part of Japanese cuisine. As far as culinary expertise or a wide variety of flavors it has to be Japanese or French as the developed styles of cooking. Chinese is like "throw everything in a pot and cook" and Thai is like "throw everything in a pot with peppers and cook." I never figured out the attraction of the boiling stuff in water at MK. Some Thai food is OK as long as the peppers are not added so you can't taste anything else. Thai seafood I eat once a week, lobster, scallops and whatever saltwater fish looks good. I never eat Thai fresh water anything.

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Edited by thailiketoo
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Japanese food, it seems to be cooked without all the oil that Thai food is and you cannot argue with the facts that generally Japanese live an average of 12-15 years longer than Thais, but I think a lot of that has to do with more refined culture too

Edited by Smurkster
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Thai food is much better because of the flavours. I hate Japanese food (too much fish), but it's not as bad as Korean food - the worst 'cuisine' in the world. Rice, kimchie, a fried, un-gutted fish and soup made from something that used to live under a rock on the beach... for every single meal: breakfast, lunch & dinner. It all tastes the same... and everything is slathered in gochu-jang (hot, bitter red pepper paste).

I feel that Korean food is some of the tastiest i have ever had, great meats and all those unlimited side dishes, fresh veggies, its delicious

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Japanese food, it seems to be cooked without all the oil that Thai food is and you cannot argue with the facts that generally Japanese live an average of 12-15 years longer than Thais, but I think a lot of that has to do with more refined culture too

Japanese tempura is all cooked in oil and Thai Khao Man Gai (one of the most common and popular Thai foods) , soups and all that MK stuff is not cooked in oil.

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Thai food is much better because of the flavours. I hate Japanese food (too much fish), but it's not as bad as Korean food - the worst 'cuisine' in the world. Rice, kimchie, a fried, un-gutted fish and soup made from something that used to live under a rock on the beach... for every single meal: breakfast, lunch & dinner. It all tastes the same... and everything is slathered in gochu-jang (hot, bitter red pepper paste).

You will fit right in ...

1. classic TV move by creating Red Herring/Deflection from the original post

2. classic generalization (not all Korean food are slathered in kochujang)

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Japanese food, it seems to be cooked without all the oil that Thai food is and you cannot argue with the facts that generally Japanese live an average of 12-15 years longer than Thais, but I think a lot of that has to do with more refined culture too

Japanese tempura is all cooked in oil and Thai Khao Man Gai (one of the most common and popular Thai foods) , soups and all that MK stuff is not cooked in oil.

Khao Man Gai not cooked in Oil?? the name of the dish is literally "rice fat chicken" the dish is swimming in oil! the greasy texture of the rice is enough to make me want to vomit, yes tempera is cooked in oil an example of a not so healthy Japanese food

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Japanese food, it seems to be cooked without all the oil that Thai food is and you cannot argue with the facts that generally Japanese live an average of 12-15 years longer than Thais, but I think a lot of that has to do with more refined culture too

Japanese tempura is all cooked in oil and Thai Khao Man Gai (one of the most common and popular Thai foods) , soups and all that MK stuff is not cooked in oil.

Khao Man Gai not cooked in Oil?? the name of the dish is literally "rice fat chicken" the dish is swimming in oil! the greasy texture of the rice is enough to make me want to vomit, yes tempera is cooked in oil an example of a not so healthy Japanese food

Khao Man Gai. Boiled chicken and white rice served with a cup of chicken broth. One of the most common Thai street foods it is not oily at all. Suggest eat some and then comment. I have never heard anyone say Khao Man Gai was greasy at all.

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Edited by thailiketoo
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<script type='text/javascript'>window.mod_pagespeed_start = Number(new Date());</script>

Japanese food, it seems to be cooked without all the oil that Thai food is and you cannot argue with the facts that generally Japanese live an average of 12-15 years longer than Thais, but I think a lot of that has to do with more refined culture too

Japanese tempura is all cooked in oil and Thai Khao Man Gai (one of the most common and popular Thai foods) , soups and all that MK stuff is not cooked in oil.

Khao Man Gai not cooked in Oil?? the name of the dish is literally "rice fat chicken" the dish is swimming in oil! the greasy texture of the rice is enough to make me want to vomit, yes tempera is cooked in oil an example of a not so healthy Japanese food

Khao Man Gai. Boiled chicken and white rice served with a cup of chicken broth. One of the most common Thai street foods it is not oily at all. Suggest eat some and then comment. I have never heard anyone say Khao Man Gai was greasy at all.

Im sorry Im really confused because I have eaten Khao Man GAi several times and made it also before, the rice is made with RENDERED chicken fat, hence the name Khao man Gai which is as I said earlier means "rice fat chicken." Maybe we are eating two separate foods I do not know, but I have heard the word oily used for khao man gai many times before, infact when I made it for my mother when I went to visit her she didn't like it because it was "too oily." there is a stall down the street from where I live, I have eaten it too many times to count and it is of course the "ไขมัน"(fat) that makes this dish what it is.....

Edited by Smurkster
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If I had to pick out of the 2 japanese food In Japan in your AVERAGE japanese restaurant is far cleaner and healthier and better prepared with superior ingredients to thai food in Thailand in your AVERAGE thai restaurant.

I love japanese food, and although the japs do suffer from stokes more often on account of high sodium diet due to soy sause type products, and Mercury poisoning on account of the quantity of fish they consume. I'll take my chances and balance my diet accordingly, than eat forever more an average thai diet (in Thailand) and suffer the higher risk of diabetes, clogged arteries, worms of all kinds and general alements caused by the poor ingredients, high fat, sugar, Palm oil, and poor prep (on account of poor hygiene conditions, by Japanese standards) of the average thai eatery.

On a personal level, when in Thailand I eat thai food, when in Japan I eat Japanese food, when in Italy I eat Italian food, I travel a lot for work and pleasure and enjoy everything the world has to offer. Indian being my favourite... Probably the most calorific food of all time, but fking delicious so who cares? Balance is the key

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Japanese cuisine has great rolls with spicy mayo, but Thai cuisine has great noodle dishes and curry.

I would think you haven't explored either cuisine to any extent if you reduce one to "spicy mayo" and the other to "noodle dishes and curry."

which do you like better

Why does one have to be better than the other? Why not enjoy them both, as well as other national foods, and try something beyond the usual food court offerings?

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<script type='text/javascript'>window.mod_pagespeed_start = Number(new Date());</script>

Japanese tempura is all cooked in oil and Thai Khao Man Gai (one of the most common and popular Thai foods) , soups and all that MK stuff is not cooked in oil.

Khao Man Gai not cooked in Oil?? the name of the dish is literally "rice fat chicken" the dish is swimming in oil! the greasy texture of the rice is enough to make me want to vomit, yes tempera is cooked in oil an example of a not so healthy Japanese food

Khao Man Gai. Boiled chicken and white rice served with a cup of chicken broth. One of the most common Thai street foods it is not oily at all. Suggest eat some and then comment. I have never heard anyone say Khao Man Gai was greasy at all.

Im sorry Im really confused because I have eaten Khao Man GAi several times and made it also before, the rice is made with RENDERED chicken fat, hence the name Khao man Gai which is as I said earlier means "rice fat chicken." Maybe we are eating two separate foods I do not know, but I have heard the word oily used for khao man gai many times before, infact when I made it for my mother when I went to visit her she didn't like it because it was "too oily." there is a stall down the street from where I live, I have eaten it too many times to count and it is of course the "ไขมัน"(fat) that makes this dish what it is.....

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