Jump to content

Dressing internal timber doors.


sipi

Recommended Posts

I have a bedroom door which has has started catching on the floor tiles when we open or close it. 

When I tried to dismount it at the hinges a few of the screws refused to budge and started rounding out.

I guess it will be easy enough to dress the bottom of the door insitue but the only way I can figure how to do it would be to tuck a square of sandpaper under it and open and close the door to remove the excess timber. I can envisage the paper folding on itself with every swing and Sipi getting all flustered.

Any suggestions?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have tried the sandpaper slide as well.

 

Its ok but not really a good answer. The sandpaper slide of pulling it left and right, back and forth unfortunately only sands down the 1mm on the door edges.

 

Because there is no pressure applied to the other 30mm of the door thickness you end up with a round bottom (if you havent got one already!)

 

If your problem is removing knackered screw heads; try this tip:

find a rubber band, one  thats about 5mm wide. apply in knackered head and use screwy. The rubber band creates friction and bite and you may be succesful.

 

a further tip:  dont replace the knackered screw

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, lemonjelly said:

You take a door off by removing the "pen" in the hinge, you can usually drive it out with a hammer and a nail. 

less than 1% chance that anyone here has hinge "pIns"

regular butts or washered is the norm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I looked at driving out the hinge pin but these things look like they were made in ancient Egypt to lock the pyramids. Heavy duty.

Yes the other option is to drill out the screws but there are 4 hinges with 8 screws in each hinge.

This is the first door to rub but I am sure the others will follow in sympathy.

If I must I will remove it and maybe easier to just lift it a few mm, but for now that is plan B.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, sipi said:

I looked at driving out the hinge pin but these things look like they were made in ancient Egypt to lock the pyramids. Heavy duty.

Yes the other option is to drill out the screws but there are 4 hinges with 8 screws in each hinge.

This is the first door to rub but I am sure the others will follow in sympathy.

If I must I will remove it and maybe easier to just lift it a few mm, but for now that is plan B.

WD40, a drift and a ball pein hammer.... it'll budge eventually 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

An impact driver will also do the trick, either a fancy battery job, or the sort you hit with a hammer :)

 

There doesn't actually have to be much grip left in the screw head, so long as there is some.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd think about replacing the hinges and/or the screws - if the hinges have come loose that may be why the door has dropped. Drill out the rounded screws, starting with the top hinge, check  that it still holds firm, and replace with good tight fitting screws, then check the door for drag, before going for the next hinge down. Worst case is that you then have to remove half of the screws again to get the door off to plane it down a few mm. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The other point is that, as long as the door openings haven't changed shape, rehanging the doors correctly using new screws will solve the problem. Gary Katz has a great video and article on the correct order to put in the screws to ensure the door is square in its opening. He is actually fitting a prefit door but the principals are all there Fitting a door

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As said you won't find hinges in Thailand with the removable hinge pin., mainly because most of the doors here are hung to open outward so the hinges are on the outside and it would be easy to just remove the on to break in.  I'm American and doors there are hung to open in and the removable pinned hinges are the norm.  That said it doesn't help your problem!

 

It sounds like you have already rounded out the head of the screw so you are already in a bind.  The first thing that I would try is to remove it with a hand impact driver.  Find a screwdriver insert that properly  fits into what's left of the screw head and give it a couple of hard hits, it might just loosen it enough to get it out with a screwdriver or vice grips. but is f it was initially put in with an impact driver, good luck.  You could then try removing it with the drift and hammer but again, good luck!  Your best option is to drill out the had of the screw and remove the hinge. To reattach the hinge I would drill and counter sink new holes in the hinge and not worry about trying to get the old screws out.

 

On undamaged screws I would find the correct screwdriver bit and "start" each screw with a hand held impact driver and remove with either a battery driver or normal screwdriver.  FINDING THE CORRECT SIZE BIT TO FIT THE SCREW AND CONSTANT EVEN PRESSURE IS THE KEY!

 

One question: Why do the doors have 4 hinges, do they weigh a ton?  Normally hinges are sold in sets.  Each set contains 2 hinges and one set is usually used on each door unless the door is very heavy or "wrapped".

 

I've done it a few times with the wife's bathroom door over the past 19 years.  When she showered there was a cyclone in the bathroom and everything got drenched and the cheap hinges suffered the worst!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have 3 doors that I havta replace...would it be reasonable to assume that the supplier (Homepro and etc,) would offer competent folks to install them, including all fittings, locks and etc?

 

I've tried to hang doors meself and they are a huge hassle and never turn out right...better just to throw money at it for a job well done...

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you have no bite for a screwdriver then the chances of drilling all the screw out is nil.

 

I'd prise the hinges from the frame, pulling the screws out. Do this slowly so as to not split the frame. Insert hardwood dowells into the holes, that way you can keep the hinges in the same position.

 

Otherwise, agree with wayned, drill out the screwheads and resite the hinges.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.





×
×
  • Create New...