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Thai university admission system revamped in response to criticism


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Thai university admission system revamped in response to criticism

By CHULEEPORN ARAMNET 
THE NATION 

 

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THE THAI UNIVERSITY Central Admission System (TCAS) has devised a new schedule and new rules, aiming at solving problems detected earlier this year.

 

“We will reduce the TCAS period to just six and a half months in the coming year,” Professor Suchatvee Suwansawat said in his capacity as the head of Council of University Presidents of Thailand (CUPT).

 

He also promised to lower the TCAS fees: the test fee for each academic field in the third round will drop from Bt200 to Bt100, and the management fee will also be halved, from Bt100 to Bt50. 

 

The additional key conditions from the new TCAS are: each successful applicant can turn down an allocated spot just once; the third round will require applicants to prioritise their choices; and the seat will be allocated based on the prioritised list in the third round for successful candidates.

 

“But this time, applicants will be able to list six programmes in the third round,” Suchatvee said. 

 

Earlier this year, TCAS was widely criticised because its third round did not require prioritisation of four choices. Successful applicants, with very high scores, were offered four seats from four programmes while many others simply did not get any offers at all. Candidates securing seats at medical schools were found to have dominated the list of successful applicants in many other programmes including the communication arts.

 

Although these highly successful candidates were required to choose just one programme at the end of the third round, the fact that they were offered up to five seats meant several applicants emerged from the third round empty-handed. 

 

Suchatvee said the new rules and schedule of the TCAS were prepared after three committees were set up to evaluate the implementation of the TCAS in its first year, to study ways to improve it and to upgrade the relevant IT system. 

 

“But the TCAS will still have five rounds,” he maintained. In the first round, the student’s portfolio is the main criterion. In the second round, quota seats are offered to specific groups of students, such as sports talents or those living in the chosen institute’s home region.

 

The third round sees applicants sitting academic exams, whose scores determine which choice becomes available to them. 

 

In the fourth round, the criteria are accumulated as grade point average, Ordinary National Educational Test (Onet) scores and General Aptitude Test (GAT)/Professional Aptitude Test (PAT) scores.

 

The fifth round features direct admission by each university.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30352580

 
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-- © Copyright The Nation 2018-08-21
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A totally unnecessary, over-centralized clusterf**k, as they say.

 

This reeks of bureaucracy gone mad; as far as I know there was no need to create a centralized admissions system, it didn't/doesn't work well, and no one asked for it.

 

Some bureaucrat wanted greater budgets and greater prestige, so they created a monster to have under their control. The thing with monsters is...

 

I have said it before and (sadly) need to say it again; the single greatest threat to Thailand's future and prosperity are the Ministry of Education and the bureaucrats who run it.

 

 

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Talked to a number of my students about it, and they all say it is a horrendous system in terms of its complex nature, high costs, lack of flexibility, and seeming over complication of everything. You can only despair as the people behind such monstrous schemes simply don't care or want to listen as they see such things as their very own prestige project of uber-high importance.

The MoE is still run by military buffoons and some appointed technocrats, it's an abomination and simply nowhere near fit for purpose

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2 hours ago, Samui Bodoh said:

A totally unnecessary, over-centralized clusterf**k, as they say.

 

This reeks of bureaucracy gone mad; as far as I know there was no need to create a centralized admissions system, it didn't/doesn't work well, and no one asked for it.

 

Some bureaucrat wanted greater budgets and greater prestige, so they created a monster to have under their control. The thing with monsters is...

 

I have said it before and (sadly) need to say it again; the single greatest threat to Thailand's future and prosperity are the Ministry of Education and the bureaucrats who run it.

 

 

 

"I have said it before and (sadly) need to say it again; the single greatest threat to Thailand's future and prosperity are the Ministry of Education and the bureaucrats who run it."

 

Well said, and highly disappointing that there has been basically no reform.

 

 

 

 

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In UK there is a process called UCAS which allocates candidates to Universities with unfilled vacancies in various subject areas.  It usually takes about two weeks to match the candidates with the Universities.and is FREE.

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53 minutes ago, scorecard said:

 

"I have said it before and (sadly) need to say it again; the single greatest threat to Thailand's future and prosperity are the Ministry of Education and the bureaucrats who run it."

 

Well said, and highly disappointing that there has been basically no reform.

 

You are right there has been no reform. Education is just one among a group of 11 reforms that are in the never-ending pipeline.

Same old story....Pinocchio promises without any action. A head of one of those committees said no headway had been made in four years. Plenty of seafood lunches but no progress.

Action Man has now instructed the umpteen committees to complete the reforms before the election. The possibility of lost votes must be playing on his mind.

http://www.khaosodenglish.com/featured/2018/05/14/junta-appointees-concede-national-reforms-have-little-to-show/

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2 hours ago, scorecard said:

 

"I have said it before and (sadly) need to say it again; the single greatest threat to Thailand's future and prosperity are the Ministry of Education and the bureaucrats who run it."

 

Well said, and highly disappointing that there has been basically no reform.

 

 

 

 

If it churns out little generals,  or compliant bean counters, why fix what ain't Broken?  ?

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...and what about those who were disadvantaged, overcharged etc., in the previous round? 

Will they be offered positions and will refunds be provided?

 

what about sacking the lunatics who were responsible for the previous debacle ?

 

SO MANY QUESTIONS...Doubt there will be any Satisfactory answers. 

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16 hours ago, Samui Bodoh said:

A totally unnecessary, over-centralized clusterf**k, as they say.

 

This reeks of bureaucracy gone mad; as far as I know there was no need to create a centralized admissions system, it didn't/doesn't work well, and no one asked for it.

 

Some bureaucrat wanted greater budgets and greater prestige, so they created a monster to have under their control. The thing with monsters is...

 

I have said it before and (sadly) need to say it again; the single greatest threat to Thailand's future and prosperity are the Ministry of Education and the bureaucrats who run it.

 

 

I say the same thing many times a week.  Number 2 is law enforcement/justice system 

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