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Ratchaburi Must Defuse Massive WWII Bombs


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Ratchaburi Must Defuse Massive WWII Bombs

By Teeranai Charuvastra, Staff Reporter

 

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Yu Klanked, 99, told reporters Wednesday how he was recruited by Japanese soldiers to help repair Chulalongkorn Bridge after it was destroyed by the Allied bombing in 1942.

 

RATCHABURI — For seven decades, Ratchaburi province residents have coexisted peacefully with a cluster of Allied bombs lodged in their riverbed. That truce is now over.

 

Provincial officials said Thursday the unexploded ordnance – bombs said to be 1,000 pounds (about 450kg) each – must be removed by year’s end to make way for a new railway line. A deputy governor warned the effort would be difficult, hampered by the river’s depth and a lack of knowledge about the WWII-era bombs.

 

Full story: http://www.khaosodenglish.com/news/2018/08/30/ratchaburi-must-defuse-massive-wwii-bombs/

 
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-- © Copyright Khaosod English 2018-08-30
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quote "A deputy governor warned the effort would be difficult, hampered by the river’s depth and a lack of knowledge about the WWII-era bombs."

 

The bombs are from allied aircraft which means that they are either British or American. Therefore a simple check to both governments UXB teams will give you most of the details. If they were asked nicely the governments would send a team or two to Thailand, firstly to defuse, remove and destroy them and secondly to give the Thai teams some OJT and experience.

 

Or am I being silly thinking like that?

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1 hour ago, billd766 said:

quote "A deputy governor warned the effort would be difficult, hampered by the river’s depth and a lack of knowledge about the WWII-era bombs."

 

The bombs are from allied aircraft which means that they are either British or American. Therefore a simple check to both governments UXB teams will give you most of the details. If they were asked nicely the governments would send a team or two to Thailand, firstly to defuse, remove and destroy them and secondly to give the Thai teams some OJT and experience.

 

Or am I being silly thinking like that?

Come now you think the Thai military would ask bloody farangs how to sort out this problem?

Not a chance in hell, we are Thai we know better than any farang.... BOOM.

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6 hours ago, colinneil said:

Come now you think the Thai military would ask bloody farangs how to sort out this problem?

Not a chance in hell, we are Thai we know better than any farang.... BOOM.

 

They are only 1,000 pound bombs. Tiddlers really but they will still hurt if you whack it with a 14 pound sledgehammer.

 

A 12,000 or a 22,000 pound bomb I would worry about.

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7 hours ago, from the home of CC said:

At first we talked to the army. The army said it’s underwater, so we had to call in the navy,” he said. “Then the navy said it’s an airborne bomb, so we have to ask the air force.”

 

Then the air force said " better talk to the army"

Better send in the submarine.

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23 hours ago, colinneil said:

Come now you think the Thai military would ask bloody farangs how to sort out this problem?

Not a chance in hell, we are Thai we know better than any farang.... BOOM.

Well they did in Chiang Rai a bit more than a month ago....?! and the results were fantastic !

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Quote

Yu Klanked, 99, told reporters he was one of the local men the Japanese recruited to help repair the bridge. The first attempt failed, causing a locomotive to fall into the river.

 

Thai infrastructure construction has a long and storied history that continues into current/modern times....

 

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“We’re not sure what type of bombs they are. We have to search for more information,” Veerat Prasetto said in an interview. “If something goes wrong, it would cause a huge impact.”

 

Veerat added that officials aren’t sure how many bombs there are. The townspeople have long thought there were three, but experts believe there could be up to five, he said.

 

“They have been there for all these years,” deputy governor Veerat said. “When the tide is low, you can see the bomb’s fin.”

 

Anybody else's sphincter clench a little while reading the article?

 

 

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