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Police preparing speedy immigration process


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14 minutes ago, KhonkaenExpat said:

The male immigration officers are always the slowest driving the computer, the female immigration officers much faster, they say women are better at multi-tasking     

 

You mean they can use both hands when typing details into the system?

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tried my non 0 visa extension 12 months was told buy the same ofice 1 year ago non im based on mariage still have to go to  cambodian border every 90 days but today i tried to change it to a retiererment visa then i can go to prachinburi ofice 90 days it seems like everytime i go there its different rules non of them are on the web page pictures of my wife daughter took a 3 month bank stat in english now she wants 6 months in thai but i have to deposit 1000 bht into the acc before i get the stat getting getting beyond a joke in aus a 1 year visa is for 1 year not 90 days

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13 hours ago, stanleycoin said:

I would say, make sure they are all staffed with female immigration officers.

they tend to be more efficient.

I always look for a booth staffed by female officers.

Good job ladies :thumbsup:

 

The last female immigration officer I encountered was not a good experience...

I think she just found out that morning her hubby had several mia noi's !!

Face like smacked arse, attitude like a dictator, communication skills of a *&%#$ !!

 

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24 minutes ago, hotchilli said:

The last female immigration officer I encountered was not a good experience...

I think she just found out that morning her hubby had several mia noi's !!

Face like smacked arse, attitude like a dictator, communication skills of a *&%#$ !!

 

It could just be,  that your not Handsome man any more :giggle: 

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13 minutes ago, stanleycoin said:

It could just be,  that your not Handsome man any more :giggle: 

My 3 mia nois would disagree with you there... 

the 1st one always say's good morning handsome man

the 2nd one always ask's what would you like for breakfast handsome man

the 3rd always say's I've ironed your shirt ready for work handsome man 😉

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On 10/22/2018 at 6:02 AM, Thaiwrath said:

Unfortunately, the Thai definition of "speedy" is not quite the same as some other peoples'.

Let's hope it can be a success though.

So true, speed up a system that is at least 20 years out of date 

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The Speed hopefully something  different than the Speed I am thinking about. Fill each immigration booth during busy periods or is this too difficult to absorb. Remember The Thais are known for Making Anything Simple-Difficult or Anything Difficult Impossible.

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They can put up a sign and have a special lane for:

 

"Ill-Intentioned Groups, darked-skinned and/or dodgy characters"

 

and speedily process them to the departure lounge......555

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20 hours ago, hotchilli said:

The last female immigration officer I encountered was not a good experience...

I think she just found out that morning her hubby had several mia noi's !!

Face like smacked arse, attitude like a dictator, communication skills of a *&%#$ !!

 

You're describing my former wife.

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19 hours ago, hotchilli said:

My 3 mia nois would disagree with you there... 

the 1st one always say's good morning handsome man

the 2nd one always ask's what would you like for breakfast handsome man

the 3rd always say's I've ironed your shirt ready for work handsome man 😉

Do you shag them in that order as well?

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Let's hope they really can speed things up without opening up opportunities for ill-intentioned groups.  It seems that, while the process is dead slow, compared to other Asian countries, including China, the ill-intentioned groups have no trouble coming to Thailand and setting themselves up in criminal activities including boiler rooms, and romance scams.  Apparently there are also a large number of people still able to enter the country on forged or stolen passports.

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On 10/22/2018 at 5:15 AM, Fex Bluse said:

Thai officials always prefer temporary plans to comprehensive, long term ones. I suppose long-term plans are less sanuk less fun

Isn't that the pot calling the kettle black? The English spelling system has not been upgraded in 250 years and this laissez-faire has cost, is costing, and will cause delayed learning to read and spell by at least 3 years (by billions of native-speakers of all Commonwealth countries and the USA and non-native speakers). This lack of long-term planning by the British has cost and is costing a lot more money, if one wants to have a well-educated, competitive workforce. There are twice as many dyslexics in English-speaking countries (including a lot of students who struggle to learn to read and spell) as there are in languages that have a more regular and friendly system. ThIs lack of long-term planning means also that the learning of far more important subjects like ethics, financial literacy,... assuming that the elite desires this for its subjects will not be done. Pedagogies are and have been of the teacher-led kind, something that most gurus find an absolute horror as activities that stress rote memorization of (stupid and irregular) spellings. This lack of planning also has prevented and prevents social mobility on a grand scale, favouring the wealthy and the educated. Finally, most of us know how hard it is for someone to learn to pronounce words if one is not a native-speaker of English, especially so considering the absurdly high number of accents. Is it hard for you to find a Thai GF who can speak more than snake-snake fish-fish, one that one can have a monologue with? Considering English is a lingua franca the number of people affected is about 2 to 3 billion people. On the other hand, there are plenty of websites offering temporary lessons and lots of excuses to explain the reason behind the lack of that comprehensive, long-term plan that should have been put in place a long time ago. And to think that many laughed and still laugh at (and obstruct in many ways) the Americans for attempting to upgrade the system. Btw, do Thais need to build a new airport for this temporary influx or will you complain about that long-term plan too? Maybe it is time to look at our problems and fixing them, as a way to show that we are really that much better. No? We can pretend and point or find a long-term fix. What will it be? Excuses?

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It's rather off topic but Thai spelling has also not been reformed for a long time, while Laos, with a similar writing system reformed its spelling after the communist takeover to make it easier to learn.  Thai still has a lot of redundant letters that had a role in the Pali language they were taken from but are not useful in Thai.  Thai likes to preserve original spellings of loan words and uses silent marks to do it.

 

English also preserves original spellings from other languages which is  one of the reasons that spellings are different.  On the other hand it makes it easy to figure out the the meanings of new long words taken from other languages, if you happen to know that language, usually Latin or Greek.  These polysyllabic words would be a mess if reduced to a baby spelling system.  In addition English has many words pronounced the same but spelled differently with no differentiation through tones possible, unlike Thai.  If all words that are pronounced the same had to be spelled the same, it would be difficult to figure which word was which in the written language.

 

Back to the topic.  The Immigration Act is over 40 years old.  So Thai officials seem happy with using that long term fix. 

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20 hours ago, Arkady said:

It's rather off topic but Thai spelling has also not been reformed for a long time, while Laos, with a similar writing system reformed its spelling after the communist takeover to make it easier to learn. 

Thank you, Arkady, for the interesting reply in which you make strong counter-arguments for keeping English as is.

 

Interesting titbit on how Laos was upgraded to be easier to learn. It is worth noting that the Finnish spelling system was designed at around the same time that the English spelling system was and, yet, they could not be more different in terms of "engineering".

 

I do not wish to go off-topic, but the OP was about a generalization (based on this news story): how Thai people cannot generally make long-term plans. I simply presented an example showing that sometimes other cultures/countries have plans that need upgrades. As you have alluded to, there are plenty of examples showing that Thais can make long-term plans. Thais decided to build the new Bkk airport for instance. It was touted at the time by the naysayers as being too big and too far. How big can Bkk get? Will the airport become too small?

 

Quote

 

[...] Thai likes to preserve original spellings of loan words and uses silent marks to do it.

 

English also preserves original spellings from other languages which is  one of the reasons that spellings are different. 

 

Interesting! Are all foreign words coded and profiled this way? Please message me with examples.

 

True. It is S. Johnson who put this in place 250 years ago, but as Finnish proves, it did not need to be done this way.

 

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On the other hand it makes it easy to figure out the the meanings of new long words taken from other languages, if you happen to know that language, usually Latin or Greek. 

True, but this is not a slam dunk. A more accurate phonemic representations of written words (no matter how big they are) makes it easier to figure out the meaning of ANY new words as one hears them uttered in many different contexts. One can make the link between the written word and the spoken word in a more accurate and reliable manner instantly The first time a learner sees the spelling of words as "eight" or "height" (and thousands of irregularly or oddly spelled words), they will not be able to make those links (utterances + meaning to orthographic + meaning). This is why Finnish, Spanish, Italian learners can decode in a matter of weeks, but also comprehend words a larger number of words faster. A learner could decode any word after s/he has learned the alphabet, in matters of weeks, not years. As I have stated it also opens the door to more progressive pedagogies and better social mobility chances.

 

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These polysyllabic words would be a mess if reduced to a baby spelling system. 

It is true that inferences that can be made between related polysyllabic words would be  weaker, more difficult with a more more transparent spelling system, but (a) these words are far and few, (b) the consonances are usually the same/these links are preserved to a large degree, (c) these multisyllabic words are learned after a few years, not in the fist 3 years of learning (in a native-like environment), and (d) context can help in most cases. If we were to respell "photo" as "foto" all the words that have "photo" would still be linked on a morphological level, even in the rare events of vowel changes: fotocopy/fetografer. I do agree that --in those rare instances-- the link would be obscured, but one would still be able to make these inferences. It is worth noting that there are a lot of false positives currently. Is "legal" about "legs"? Granted, it is also true that there will be other false positives if a new system was to be put in place. On the other hand, I agree it is one advantage of the current English spelling system, but I am sure we would agree that it does not help at all the most fragile of learners (the young, the lower socio-economic children, and the beginners, even the most advantaged type) for the first 3 years of learning. Also, it does not help in terms of pronunciation, esp, for foreign learners and for those new written words. A morphological spelling system has a lot more negatives. 

 

A baby spelling has its appeal. We know that the rates of illiteracy and "dyslexia" are often half as high with languages that have a transparent spelling system. If the way the English spelling system was so beneficial, wouldn't the stats be reversed? I have stated all of the other advantages before. There are many, Simplicity does not mean stupidity. Have you seen those electrical cables hanging from polls in Asia? That is the ultimate example of complexity, but it is a sure pain to fix. We all know that internal combustion engine cars are complex machines that are much more difficult to fix than the newer and simpler electrical cars. The external design of the car (the language) will not be altered. A spelling system is a superficial element. It only represents in writing what is a thought. That it is "clue" or "klue", it is still the same concept.

 

Quote

 

In addition English has many words pronounced the same but spelled differently with no differentiation through tones possible, unlike Thai.  If all words that are pronounced the same had to be spelled the same, it would be difficult to figure which word was which in the written language.

That is a fair point, but the reverse is just as bad. Currently, one needs to remember which spellings must be used for which similarly pronounced word, or homonyms. There are many words (homographs) that have multiple meanings and this is not an issue. No one I know has any difficulty knowing that "bat" has several meanings. And while it could be a source of added confusion in terms of comprehension, instances of confusion are rare in spoken conversation. The context helps. And even in the worst case scenario, in writing with little context, most of these would be synonyms would be differentiated by their word function and location in a sentence: "That down is nice especially down on the bed."

 

Lastly, to be fair to me, there were many elements in my OP that were not conceded in your reply. At most levels, a more phonemic spelling system makes a lot of sense.

still, there are possible logistical issues that could make a reform difficult. It would not be impossible. It just would take intelligent human beings and leaders to have a long-term vision!

 

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Back to the topic.  The Immigration Act is over 40 years old.  So Thai officials seem happy with using that long term fix. 

True, but we all could argue it could use a little upgrade. The process has improved in 10 years though. There is still room for progress!

 

I wonder, to get back on topic, whether or not the BKK arrival terminal can accommodate more lines, more immigration officers. In my country, they have a passport scanner that, I figure, must help speed up arrivals as immigration officers, I guess, do not have to enter all the data in the system. Is it probably more efficient? Is it worth it? Is there room for those? Could that be part of a solution?

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before Big Joke's "No Tips"

copies at immigration office: give some "tips for the girl", up to you.

 

after Big Joke's "No Tips"

copies are 2 baht a sheet, no receipt.

 

everything is same same, business as usual 😄

indeed, the whole immigration office is a big joke.

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1 hour ago, THE REVERAND said:

Jet setter is amazes me how the junior schools say "They Are Teaching English" when they have 40 students in a class for 4hrs per week. Most the teachers cannot speak decent English.

Btw, my username is JeStsetter, but it could have been ILovePunPunToo! I hope that is her woman's name too. LOL

 

Yes, 40 students is a joke to teach English, especially if you are in Tak. 4 hrs per week is not much. If I was a teacher here I would do my darnest to find real people and real situation to make the teaching relevant, including blank stares of English-speaking expats not comprehending the fish-fish snake-snake bits. In fairness, the schools in the boonies should get more money to allow this to happen and so should the teachers (for legitimate learning of English). I am sure the prettiest of all will find a way to improve her English. LOL English is a hard monster to tame. Imagine a world where everyone could easily learn English. But I am off-topic. 

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22 hours ago, JestSetter said:

It is true that inferences that can be made between related polysyllabic words would be  weaker, more difficult with a more more transparent spelling system, but (a) these words are far and few, (b) consonants are usually the same/these links are preserved to a large degree, [...]

Another edit. 

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  • 1 month later...
On 10/22/2018 at 1:34 PM, DJ54 said:

Awesome... uhh maybe. I remember my last flight in a bunch of tourist and a short 4 hour wait........isn’t there a special line they’ve 

just created for some folks....

3 weeks ago there was immigration for Thai Farrang and Chinese at DMK. No queue at Farrang straight through.

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