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What does this note say?


OJAS
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I gathered from the people who deliver our drinking water in crates of 20 x 1-litre recyclable bottles on a weekly basis every Sunday that they were no longer able to provide this service for the time being because of COVID-19. But can anyone shed any light on what the note they left with me (text below) says, please? Their knowledge of English is on a par with mine of Thai - i.e. virtually non-existent!

 

image.thumb.png.15b45e3be983e3d1b3b1e8edd71c931d.png

 

 

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According to Mr Google they will change from re-useable bottles to disposable bottles (at higher cost) until the COVID situation improves.  That should help until someone who can actually read Thai does so.

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In a nutshell:

For customers of DK Drinking Water in Rayong province the reusable bottles at 60 baht per crate will be replaced with disposable bottles at 70 baht per crate until the Covid situation improves.

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On 1/10/2021 at 7:36 AM, OJAS said:

 

 

image.thumb.png.15b45e3be983e3d1b3b1e8edd71c931d.png

 

I realize that the OP is probably not interested in the Thai but for those who are:   Does anyone have an opinion on why they added (ต้นทุนสูงกว่า) ? In Thaigrit,  would that be สูงกว่าต้นทุนเดิม ?  Why add it? Could it be that they feel that an extra 10THB needs justification? 
What does the container look like, would you call it a crate or is ลัง what they call containers for bottles? 

 

Edited by tgeezer
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On 1/12/2021 at 7:13 PM, tgeezer said:

I realize that the OP is probably not interested in the Thai but for those who are:   Does anyone have an opinion on why they added (ต้นทุนสูงกว่า) ? In Thaigrit,  would that be สูงกว่าต้นทุนเดิม ?  Why add it? Could it be that they feel that an extra 10THB needs justification? 
What does the container look like, would you call it a crate or is ลัง what they call containers for bottles? 

 

The reusable bottles which were available up until a fortnight ago were certainly placed in real genuine McCoy crates each containing 20 x 1-litre bottles - see illustration below. However the disposable bottles which are solely available now are actually in multipacks like those which you can buy in Tesco Lotus or Big C. Each of these multipacks appears to contain rather less than 20 litres in total, in which case we are then talking about a considerable price hike in real terms.

 

Does the DK Drinking Water note actually state precisely how many litres of water you are now getting in total for 70 THB?

 

 

 

 

IMG_20210117_125639.jpg

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5 hours ago, OJAS said:

Does the DK Drinking Water note actually state precisely how many litres of water you are now getting in total for 70 THB?

No. There's an implication that nothing else is changing but that's all.

 

On 1/12/2021 at 12:13 PM, tgeezer said:

What does the container look like, would you call it a crate or is ลัง what they call containers for bottles?

 

In the film 4 Kings, they use the word ลัง for what we would call a crate. I'm not sure if that's what you're driving at. On your other question, I think the words in brackets are there to explain why the price is going up.

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I found ลัง in the RID roughly a square container made of wood or ลาน for containing things. Interestingly, to me at any rate, I misread ลาน for the verb สาน which made no difference and made me think of crate. I discovered my error while preparing to comment today on a verb being employed as a noun.  
I see that Longdo says "crate".  
What I am getting at is that the container might look nothing like a crate nowadays, it may even be a cardboard box and almost certainly will no longer be made of ไม้หรือลาน, but ลัง is retained by people in the trade and to rest of us, กล่อง wouldn't be wrong but says less. ใบ would be the ลักษณะนาม I suppose. 

ลังพลาสติก is a possibility. 
 

So would you say that ต้นทุน is the original outlay of the retailer, cost price? 
NB. I see that OJAS  answered before you JHicks. addressing my post, some of the points I make are valid so I won't change anything. 

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When it comes to drawing the line between ลัง, หีบ and กล่อง, I'm bound to be influenced by English. Some things that make me more likely to use the term 'crate' in English are

 

- the container is used for shipping purposes rather than just storage (so it will be fairly sturdy)

- it has an open top and/or sides, or if they're closed, the frame is on the outside

- it contains individual items that you'd naturally count, rather than things like sand or aggregate that you'd naturally weigh

- it has separate compartments for those items

- it is reusable (so again it will be fairly sturdy)

 

The thai-language entry would suggest that the first and possibly the second of these features are also relevant in Thai. The crate in 4 Kings has all of them, so it is hard to know which makes it a ลัง. There may of course be other factors that are relevant to the Thai but not the English. I think basically have to be a native speaker to get this sort of thing right every time.

 

21 hours ago, tgeezer said:

So would you say that ต้นทุน is the original outlay of the retailer, cost price? 

 

Yes, that's how I understand it.

 

 

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Being influenced by English is unavoidable even for Thais but I do my best to not be! 
Trying to translate things like "He was driving an old crate." is an extreme example but when I first came to Thai I would try things like that.   English was a great impediment to my learning Thai and still is to some extent because I mix with the older generations.  
I see new learners making the mistakes I made, "How do you say this in Thai" and I think, Thais don't say that, then to my horror, a Thai says exactly that! When I take it to the market nobody knows what I am saying because they don't know English. 

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