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Hospice/Homecare in Songkla


TopDeadSenter

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An internet search does not give results beyond Hat Yai itself. Does anyone know whether such a service is commonly used in rural Thailand? Forcing the patient to travel to hospital multiple times daily for an injection is causing much stress and this morning was just too ill to make the trip at all. The patient wants to stay at home and enjoy time with family and with as much comfort and dignity as possible under the circumstances. Local hospital said such a service does not exist. This is in Songkla in a fairly remote area. Any extra info such as expected pricing would be helpful.

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Does not exist in Thailand  at all, let alone rural Thailand. Even affluent people in Bangkok can't arrange this.

 

What you can do is get better palliative management (which could include for example use of opiate patches  that are effective 72 hours at a time). For this, will need to see a pain management specialist  at Prince of Songkhla Hospital in Hat Yai (Songklanagarind Hospital - they have a Pain Clinic).

 

Possible that some of the same docs are at a private hospital (Sikarain Hatyai Hospital or  Rajyindee  Hospital) but not sure.

 

Ask specifically about a Fentanyl patch together with some oral morphine for any break through pain. (Even if he can't swallow, morphine tabs can be given sublingually)

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3 minutes ago, TopDeadSenter said:

Not the answer I wanted to hear, but thank you. Wonder how many of us expats realize we may not have as dignified a time as expected?

 

It is certainly a worry especially for those of us who would rather die at home.

 

If willing to die in a hospital and able to afford top end private hospital,  adequate pain control and dignity can be assurred (key is to be under the primary care of a palliative specialist and not an oncologist or other doctor).  But no way to do this in the home setting as yet..at least nto if parenteral (IV or injectable) meds are required.  And palliative care specialists are found only in a few main urban areas.

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My wife's father passed two weeks ago in the local hospital and I would say his paliative care was excellent. Her father wnted to go home to die but the hospital said he only had days, if not hours to go, and they were correct. He passed peacefully and pain free after 6 days in hospital.

 

What upset me was the 'dignity', or lack of it.

 

He stayed in the bed on the busy ward for about 4 hours after he passed while all the paperwork was completed. Then two orderlies wrapped him in a green bedsheet and tied it in 2 knots so that it looked exactly like a body wrapped in a bedsheet. The ward had no screening between beds.

 

I had arrived at the hospital just before he passed and had been asked to stop off at the local wat to pick up a plain casket. I took it to the hospital in the pickup and parked it the only place I knew in the main front parking lot.

 

The orderlies put the body on a gurney and took him down to the hospital front entrance ramp. He was lifted from the trolley and put in the casket and we set off for the wat. Fortunately this was just before dark and the pubic area was very quiet, but I was really shocked at the indignity, as well as the obvious observation that this was an everyday occurrence and only I was phased. Obviously the Thai Buddhists are more used to dealing with death than many foreigners.

 

It does bother me as I write that I may meet the same undignified end. I hope I still have enough funds to at least end my days in a private hospital.

 

 

 

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