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Thai culture: "Just two women living alone together in a garden"


rose33
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This expression has been said to me twice now in Northern Thailand by Thai ladies. Always with a big happy grin!

 

I've been in Thailand such a short time and heard the exact same phrase twice. 

 

Is this a well-known phrase?.....

-Are they lesbian couples?

-Or is it just a proud comment about their financial independence?

-A Thai version of Virginia Woolf, A Room of One's Own?

 

Really curious as to whether there is a particular cultural meaning to this.

 

I am a middle aged woman travelling alone and taking care of my own needs... and they are wanting to say this phrase to me.

 

All you farangs with Thai wives, please ask them. 

 

 

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Never heard the expression.  Maybe ask on a lesbo forum, to see if it has any meaning.   Maybe a pick up line, us ignorant folks haven't been clued into yet ... 😂

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I get a lot of "you, You Mitter" but that would help the op i guess...

Edited by ezzra
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Happy "in" the Garden = as in has no trees?

 

No plowing the furrowed ground - just a taste?

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1 hour ago, Stevemercer said:

It is sort of an illusion to a garden of Eden. Two ladies happily living in paradise and oblivious to everyone/everything else.

 

Not necessarily a lesbian thing, but more an independent and happy state of mind. But it could also imply that this happy state of mind is partly through ignorance of the real world or the person is a bit touched in the head (but still happy).

 

Anyway, I think it is being said to you in a nice way.

are you guessing or do you know this ?? 

I asked my missus, she looked baffled, never heard it and wanted to know what was said in Thai.. 

We tried rolling around a few song ying nai suan etc variants but nothing sounded right or got any glimmer of a Thai phrase.. 

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1 hour ago, TheScience said:

Allusion?

 

I seriously doubt that. Thais have no frame of reference to the Old Testament lol.

Yes, of course. I was trying to make a western comparison - going back to a time of innocence. 

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It does bring to mind Miss Lester and Miss Fabian from Nabokov's Lolita.

 

Not everyone appreciates a literary reference, I understand that.

 

Paul Laew

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3 hours ago, TheScience said:

Allusion?

 

I seriously doubt that. Thais have no frame of reference to the Old Testament lol.

Which allusion? Dis allusion?

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12 hours ago, BritManToo said:

Did they say it to you in Thai or English.

English translations of Thai proverbs/sayings often don't make any sense.

('Don't worry water' being the one I hear most often)

Agree.  Also knowing the context of when and how this was said would be helpful.  Like most Asians, Thais are big on indirect communication in order to prevent conflict and/or not offend.

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I never heard it...but it sounds cool. Thais are brilliant  at puns and linguistic jokes in English...very clever..

'Put him on moon'

 

'Space station'

etc etc

Edited by The Hammer2021
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On 1/27/2022 at 9:03 PM, BritManToo said:

Did they say it to you in Thai or English.

English translations of Thai proverbs/sayings often don't make any sense.

('Don't worry water' being the one I hear most often)

In fluent English.

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On 1/28/2022 at 9:18 AM, Berkshire said:

Agree.  Also knowing the context of when and how this was said would be helpful.  Like most Asians, Thais are big on indirect communication in order to prevent conflict and/or not offend.

Both times, I was viewing the place as possible future accom.

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28 minutes ago, rose33 said:

In fluent English.

Next time get them to say it in Thai.

Then we have a chance of knowing the meaning and a true translation.

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Not sure if applicable here but my Thai wife says if women take a pee by the roadside it is ' Watering the flowers ' , if a chap has a pee by the road side he is ' Shooting the rubbish '.

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6 minutes ago, toofarnorth said:

Not sure if applicable here but my Thai wife says if women take a pee by the roadside it is ' Watering the flowers ' , if a chap has a pee by the road side he is ' Shooting the rubbish '.

Shooting the rabbits .............

https://www.expatden.com/thai/thai-language-thai-culture-old-snake-heads-and-butterflies-of-the-night/

 

"ยิงกระต่าย /ying grà-dtàai/
Literal meaning: Shoot the rabbit
Metaphorical meaning: Male urination, often done at the side of the road"

Edited by BritManToo
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4 minutes ago, BritManToo said:

Shooting the rabbits .............

Right, the Thai phrase is ying kretai, ยิง-กฺระ-ต่าย

 

And no, it's no applicable to the topic. Now go shoot a rabbit ...

 

Paul Laew

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56 minutes ago, rose33 said:

Much nicer than back home with the horrible sound of of ride-on mowers and leaf blowers...

Yes, brush cutters, tak taks, village loudspeakers. mufflerless motorbikes and random gunshots to scare birds from the crops is much nicer i

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On 1/29/2022 at 9:42 PM, The Hammer2021 said:

'Put him on moon'

 

'Space station'

etc etc

I've never heard those.  What do they mean? 

 

Ignore him?  Give him the cold shoulder?

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