Jump to content

Covid-19: To Boost Or Not To Boost; That Is The Question


webfact
 Share

Recommended Posts

image.jpeg

 

By Editor

 

The most frequently asked question at the Be Well Medical Center is about Covid-19 vaccination boosts; to boost or not to boost. Should we get them? When? Which one?


Dr Paemika Pidchayathanakorn, family doctor and partner at the Be Well Medical Center
Dr. Paemika, general practitioner and family doctor, has some answers to these questions; her opinion follows.

 

image.jpeg

Dr Paemika Pidchayathanakorn, family doctor and partner at the Be Well Medical Center

 

After consulting  with colleagues in various countries, I must conclude that expert opinions and government directives on this matter globally differ; however, some conclusions are shared by many.

 

Vaccinations have been crucial in containing Covid-19. Researchers are to be complimented for the speed in developing effective vaccines.

 

While the immunization effect of the vaccines provides only limited protection for contracting and spreading of the virus, the real gain is that the risk of serious illness or death is significantly reduced; up to 10 times lower compared to unvaccinated persons as studies have shown.

 

image.jpeg


While all World Health Organization (WHO) approved vaccines have proven to be effective, many studies across multiple populations have shown that mRNA vaccines (e.g. Pfizer, Moderna) create a higher level of efficacy than vector vaccines (e.g. Astra, Sinovac).

 

Consequently, many governments (including Thailand) and health professionals have suggested prioritizing mRNA vaccines, despite the higher costs. However, there are also studies showing good results of people using combinations of mRNA and vector jabs.

 

Immunity wears off and the speed at which this decline takes place depends on the virus, the vaccine, and the person. It occurs quicker in older individuals.

 

As Covid-19 and all of its future mutations are likely to stay around for a long time, there is a need to keep the immunization level at an optimum level.

 

That is where boosters come in. The science is still developing, but for now, it seems that 6 months after the last inoculation a booster is due. This holds true first of all for the elderly population and for those with multiple underlying health conditions.  

 

Hence my advice to high-risk persons is to get a booster after six months. But also for anyone else wishing to reduce the chance of serious illness, including pregnant women (as recently recommended by The Royal Thai College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists), regular booster shots are to be considered.  

 

As far as children is concerned, we closely follow the government’s latest directions. The Royal College of Paediatricians of Thailand announced this week it will issue guidelines recommending mRNA- Covid-19 vaccine be given to children aged six months to five years.

 

We now await confirmation of the Ministry of Public Health if this recommendation will be implemented. The U.S. FDA determined COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective for kids 6 months and older.

 

Surely many of you heard about the new shots from Pfizer and Moderna which are bivalent, meaning that they target both the original Covid strain and omicron’s BA.5 subvariant.

 

These new vaccines, which are expected to show higher effectiveness, are already approved in other countries, including the EU, and we trust they will soon become available in Thailand as well. For some people this may be a reason to wait for the (next) booster, but I recommend high-risk persons not to delay and use the currently available vaccines.

 

Billions of vaccinations have shown that the risks are greatly outweighed by the benefits.

 

In case you have hesitations or questions about COVID vaccines, boosters, or side effects I propose that you consult your doctor.

 

At the time of writing, boosters are available free of charge at both Hua Hin Hospital and the Hua Hin Red Cross.

 

Hua Hin Hospital: Every Tuesday 9.00am to 11.30am

Hua Hin Red Cross: Pfizer for above 12 years old; Monday to Friday 8.00am to 3.30pm

 

image.png

-- © Copyright Royal Coast Review 2022-09-15
 

- Cigna offers a range of visa-compliant plans that meet the minimum requirement of medical treatment, including COVID-19, up to THB 3m. For more information on all expat health insurance plans click here.

 

Monthly car subscription with first-class insurance, 24x7 assistance and more in one price - click here to find out more!

 

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Until 2022 New Zealand has been largely covid-free with the population of five million people largely vaccinated. A medical success story.

But for 2022 the government then dropped its zero-COVID policy such as curbs on public gatherings and made mandates in schools. The government will not revert to its 2021 COVID policies.

 

Ain't freedom great?

 

But then spikes in COVID cases and deaths began in 2022. 

 

Seems also the Omicron BA.5 sub-variant is driving the current wave of new covid cases in New Zealand in 2022.

 

https://www.reuters.com/world/asia-pacific/new-zealand-covid-19-death-rate-record-levels-2022-07-22/

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

"Hence my advice to high-risk persons is to get a booster after six months." - I thought it was 4 months (eg Hua Hin Hospital, amongst other medical groups, guidelines when I received a booster last month)?

Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife wears a mask even while driving alone in the pickup, but refuses to get a booster/4th dose. Just another total lack of common sense that is such a part of life here. It wouldn't surprise me at all if some bodies are given a mask when they're put into the incinerator at the temples.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

 From the OP...

 

Hence my advice to high-risk persons is to get a booster after six months. But also for anyone else wishing to reduce the chance of serious illness, including pregnant women (as recently recommended by The Royal Thai College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists), regular booster shots are to be considered.  

 

Its not clear to me if this advice is coming from  The OP ,  The Thai doctor,   or the  WHO   and to be honest I don't really care as I shall be ignoring it 

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Bangkok Barry said:

My wife wears a mask even while driving alone in the pickup, but refuses to get a booster/4th dose. Just another total lack of common sense that is such a part of life here. It wouldn't surprise me at all if some bodies are given a mask when they're put into the incinerator at the temples.

My missis still faithfully wears her mask on her motorbike and criticises those that don't !!   but she still refuses to wear a helmet !   Thankfully she has finally  stopped wearing her ridiculous covid "face visor"  but only because nobody else is wearing one anymore  There was no way I could convince her myself

  I believe there are still some covid related protocols involved regarding funerals but to be honest I tend to avoid funerals wherever possible

Link to post
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, JimHuaHin said:

"Hence my advice to high-risk persons is to get a booster after six months." - I thought it was 4 months (eg Hua Hin Hospital, amongst other medical groups, guidelines when I received a booster last month)?

It can be after 4 months but certainly be serious about it at six.

Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Bday Prang said:

they can stick their boosters where the sun don't shine

I'm pretty sure that if you asked them, that's where they'll stick it for you ....

Link to post
Share on other sites

Each to their own.

 

Personally, after fully recovering from covid within 5 days, unvaccinated :-

 

No shots or boosters for me, thankyou.

 

No shots or boosters for the healthy 4 Year old I take care of - thankyou.

 

No boosters for my MIL, bedridden for 4 days after 1 shot - thankyou.

 

No boosters for my fit and hardy neighbour, who was bedridden for Months until her ultimate demise 3 weeks ago,  after 1 shot - thankyou.

 

Thanks very much.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

10 minutes ago, Pla Simon said:

Each to their own.

 

Personally, after fully recovering from covid within 5 days, unvaccinated :-

 

No shots or boosters for me, thankyou.

 

No shots or boosters for the healthy 4 Year old I take care of - thankyou.

 

No boosters for my MIL, bedridden for 4 days after 1 shot - thankyou.

 

No boosters for my fit and hardy neighbour, who was bedridden for Months until her ultimate demise 3 weeks ago,  after 1 shot - thankyou.

 

Thanks very much.

But, the vax has saved millions of lives.

We are all built differently, you could die from a Bee sting, folk have......😋

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

I know that the morons who make decisions for the public in this country are referred to as 'experts' but Dr. Paemika is just a general practitioner and family doctor. Is she qualified to offer such advice?

 

I am not anti-vax, but I don't care about or believe in it as much as many others appear to. But I went for my AZ booster on Wednesday at Bang Sue. WOW! Walked in, chose my [vaccine] (there were at least four options) and sat and had it done. Not one single minute of waiting for others in front of me!

The only reason I got it was for domestic airline travel in Indonesia.

Edited by onthedarkside
trolling reference removed
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Less than 50 payments made for adverse reactions to COVID-19 vaccines

 

September 18, 2022
 

...

Government Services Minister Bill Shorten seized upon the figures to criticise “fringe operators who spread misinformation” about COVID vaccines.

 

As of September 7, Services Australia had paid just 46 claims under the vaccine claims scheme. This represents just 1.6 per cent of the 2833 claims received, or 0.00007 per cent of the vaccines administered in Australia.

 

(more)

 

https://www.smh.com.au/politics/federal/less-than-50-payments-made-for-adverse-reactions-to-covid-19-vaccines-20220915-p5bigu.html

 

 

Edited by TallGuyJohninBKK
Link to post
Share on other sites

On 9/15/2022 at 2:20 AM, webfact said:

Immunity wears off and the speed at which this decline takes place depends on the virus, the vaccine, and the person. It occurs quicker in older individuals.

In other words, here we have a product which is one of the few products where, the worse its performance, the higher its profits.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The dropoff in protection of the original vaccine versions against the current Omicron variant of COVID beyond 4 months or so is more related to its protection against regular infection.

 

The current vaccines' protection against serious illness and death from COVID has been shown to be more long-lasting than the protection against just mere infection.

 

Edited by TallGuyJohninBKK
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

The question people need to ask themselves is this: Are boosters in the public interest or is the real boost here to BIG PHARMA profits? Only those who study all sides of the conversation are qualified to respond, of course. Unless I'm being naive, in which case you must correct me.

Link to post
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, AddyA said:

The question people need to ask themselves is this: Are boosters in the public interest or is the real boost here to BIG PHARMA profits? Only those who study all sides of the conversation are qualified to respond, of course. Unless I'm being naive, in which case you must correct me.

Well, I've studied the virus in great detail.  I've studied and read about the vaccines extensively, but I am less knowledgeable about them.   

You pose your question as a binary choice.  So, based on what I know, yes, it is in the public interest to get boosted.   As we move from pandemic to endemic, we still don't fully understand this virus and how it will change and what challenges it will present.   Based on that, at this point, it is in the public interest to get vaccinated.   

The more people that catch covid and transmit it, the greater the chances of mutations that could be more dangerous.   

 

We won't know for a long time how essential they are, so IMO, it's better to be safe than sorry.   

 

As for the money being made, well, that's one that needs to be watched carefully by governments.  Companies have a poor conscience and are ruled by profits.  If we look at the history of the HIV medications, it was clear that profits were at the top of the agenda.  It wasn't until countries threatened to break the patent on the medication that they started negotiating.  As far as I was concerned, Pharma was very short-sighted.  Without the medication, patients were 100% sure of dying.  With the medication, the company had a customer for life, and it was a substantially longer and more productive life.     

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...