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Driving Safely Around Thailand


yumidesign

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During the past 4 years my partner and i have driver over 70,000 ks all over the country, without incident, in a Toyota Vios bought new from a dealer in Uttaradit, which incidentally was 30,000 tbt cheaper than the dealer in Chiang Mai.

We both have Thai drivers licences. The first twelve month ones obtained from Chiang Mai the next 5 year ones obtained from Khon Kaen and the other from Chiang Mai. Different places follow different rules about what documentation is required for the issue of Thai licences to foreigners

The following tips are offered to help other would be road travellers avoid the many possible disasters that await on or near the roads in Thailand and to ‘survive the drive’

1. DRIVE DEFENSIVELY

Always assume the driver of the motor cycle in front with 5 riders all without helmets will veer across your path on their way to an unmarked road exit or the motor cycle with the mother on the back either breast feeding or bottle feeding a baby will make a track right across the lane in front of you to make a U turn

2. NEVER DRIVE AT NIGHT

Never ever. Driving under the influence in Thailand is decided when drivers after having an accident can’t stand up due to being too drunk

3. ONLY DRIVE FOR 4 - 5 HOURS MAX PER DAY

Make hourly stops to keep fresh and alert.

4. START YOUR DRIVE AFTER 11 AM

This will put you on the road with the least other traffic as most will be starting their lunch break

5. BE ON EXTRA ALERT IF WITHIN 100 KS OF BANGKOK

Avoid BKK altogether if possible there are plenty of alternative routes around the city, if you must park your car outside the city and take the bus, and stay clear of vehicles on any road with BKK number plates, there the ones with the longest name under the numbers, doing 160 clicks swerving past you on the left hand side.

BKK drivers are by far the most dangerous followed closely by those from around the far east of the country particularly around Khon Kaen and Ubon Ratchathani

6. DON’T SPEED

On the highway stay below the 90 k / hour speed. Its easier to stop if you need to and you will avoid the highway patrol speed cameras. If you drive around a lot you will get to know the police speed camera traps. For instance going into Lumpang from Chiang Mai and on the road from Lumpang to Tak there is nearly always speed cameras. The road from Khon Kaen to Chum Phae on the way to Phitsaulok is notorious for police fining vehicles for driving in the right hand lane. You can also tell when other traffic is travelling at 90 instead of the usual 160 + or oncoming traffic flash their lights

7. USE YOUR HORN AND FLASH HIGH BEAM

Especially on blind corners on narrow country roads and coming up behind half asleep motor cycle drivers wandering across your path

8. LIGHTS ON

Always drive with parking or driving lights on during daylight hours

9. INDICATOR LIGHTS

Well before any change of direction use indicator lights and check in all mirrors before proceeding, paying particular attention to motor cycles passing on inside left lane

10. DON’T SPEAK THAI

When ever stopped by officialdom never speak Thai. Always answer in English and never let any official inspect your car or belongings without you being present and showing them what they want to see. Whilst of course being super polite

11. DON’T DRIVE ALONE

If possible always drive with another driver in the car. Another pair of drivers eyes can prove very helpful

12. FULL INSURANCE

Make sure you have a good comprehensive insurance policy with a reputable company, offering good no claim discounts, which covers third party liability, costs of legal defence, liability of passengers, and bail payments

Driving the roads expolring The Kingdom can be great fun and an absolute joy, the roads are generally wide and well surfaced and if you follow the above rules you should be able to motor happily and safely, with a helping of good luck of course

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Having driven six years here (5 accidents in the first year, none afterwards--after having learned my lessons the hard way), I would recommend this list to all new drivers here. A wealth of wisdom! To my credit, I'm right in the middle of Khon Kaen country!

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While I agree with most of the OP's guidelines, I have to take issue with speaking only English...and driving with lights on during daylight hours. During my early driving days in Thailand, I have been stopped by Thai policemen...in the same speed trap mentioned along the Lampang-Tak highway...and talked my way out of a ticket by being friendly and speaking Thai to the officer. He realized I was a 'different' class of farang and let me off. They can figure this out as soon as you open your mouth. As for driving with lights on...this can get you stopped and cited in some locales. Drive smart, safe and defensively...because unfortunately the majority of local drivers aren't. After violating it myself back then, I totally agree with the OPs admonishment not to speed. I see too many Fortuners and Camry's driven at breakneck speed by Farang drivers, impatient in their pell-mell race to get to their destination...be it across town or across the countryside. Relax and take it easy out there.

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Great tips; would also suggest you drive with windows up (preferably tinted!) (and aircon on!) so police,( especially the motorbike boys) cannot see whether you are a faraing or not . Have been stopped and "fined" (a shake down) for non-existent violations and pretty sure only reason was I was driving with window down.

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Great tips; would also suggest you drive with windows up (preferably tinted!) (and aircon on!) so police,( especially the motorbike boys) cannot see whether you are a faraing or not . Have been stopped and "fined" (a shake down) for non-existent violations and pretty sure only reason was I was driving with window down.

yes tinted windows were my choice because of 1. police 2. coolness

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While I agree with most of the OP's guidelines, I have to take issue with speaking only English...and driving with lights on during daylight hours. During my early driving days in Thailand, I have been stopped by Thai policemen...in the same speed trap mentioned along the Lampang-Tak highway...and talked my way out of a ticket by being friendly and speaking Thai to the officer. He realized I was a 'different' class of farang and let me off. They can figure this out as soon as you open your mouth. As for driving with lights on...this can get you stopped and cited in some locales. Drive smart, safe and defensively...because unfortunately the majority of local drivers aren't. After violating it myself back then, I totally agree with the OPs admonishment not to speed. I see too many Fortuners and Camry's driven at breakneck speed by Farang drivers, impatient in their pell-mell race to get to their destination...be it across town or across the countryside. Relax and take it easy out there.

yes my 2 points too. speak a little thai and keeplights off in daytime. drive normally don't put lights on to draw attention to yourself

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As far as I am concerned driving in Thailand is just about the same as anywhere else. Mind you I have been in countries where driving standards are MUCH lower than in Thailand. It is all about anticipating and keeping distance. I have driven cars and ridden bikes all over Europe, some african countries, India, Thailand, USA for over 25 years at least 30k kms/year and never had an accident. I do drink more than is legally allowed on rare occassions. Stupid! I know.

ANTICIPATE continuously (expect the unexpected even in western Europe) and keep distance. Speed is only a minor factor as long as your distance is right!!!

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yes my 2 points too. speak a little thai and keeplights off in daytime. drive normally don't put lights on to draw attention to yourself

Putting lights on is exactly to draw attention to yourself. It's a requirement in Canada, seems to be in most of the US as well. Many years ago, a large interstate trucking company told its drivers to always have headlights on. Accidents were reduced by 25% and stayed at that level. Enough studies have been done to start convincing governments all over the world to do this. In my short time here, driving with lights on all the time, I've seen several cars on the opposite side start to come out to pass and then go back in - which I attribute (rightly or wrongly) to them actually being able to see me. Haven't been stopped yet for having the lights on. And I've been stopped at quite a few mandatory police checks, and lights on has never been brought up. But I find that attempting to speak Thai, and having a Thai driver's license for car and bike help to bring a smile, salute, and a wave on. Gawd, I hope I didn't just jinx myself :o

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yes my 2 points too. speak a little thai and keeplights off in daytime. drive normally don't put lights on to draw attention to yourself

Putting lights on is exactly to draw attention to yourself. It's a requirement in Canada, seems to be in most of the US as well. Many years ago, a large interstate trucking company told its drivers to always have headlights on. Accidents were reduced by 25% and stayed at that level. Enough studies have been done to start convincing governments all over the world to do this. In my short time here, driving with lights on all the time, I've seen several cars on the opposite side start to come out to pass and then go back in - which I attribute (rightly or wrongly) to them actually being able to see me. Haven't been stopped yet for having the lights on. And I've been stopped at quite a few mandatory police checks, and lights on has never been brought up. But I find that attempting to speak Thai, and having a Thai driver's license for car and bike help to bring a smile, salute, and a wave on. Gawd, I hope I didn't just jinx myself :o

My thoughts about driving with the lights on were exactly the same until last month I picked up my new Vigo from Toyota. Within 3 minutes I was stopped by the Dum Ruat and fined. My offence was driving with the lights on during the daytime and driving in the right hand lane..... it seems daytime lights are reserved for emergency vehicles....and the right hand lane is not for owners with "red" number plates.

I still try to defy both rules but constant "hen pecking" from the wife has re-educated me.....to my dismay :D

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  • 4 weeks later...
yes my 2 points too. speak a little thai and keeplights off in daytime. drive normally don't put lights on to draw attention to yourself

Putting lights on is exactly to draw attention to yourself. It's a requirement in Canada, seems to be in most of the US as well. Many years ago, a large interstate trucking company told its drivers to always have headlights on. Accidents were reduced by 25% and stayed at that level. Enough studies have been done to start convincing governments all over the world to do this. In my short time here, driving with lights on all the time, I've seen several cars on the opposite side start to come out to pass and then go back in - which I attribute (rightly or wrongly) to them actually being able to see me. Haven't been stopped yet for having the lights on. And I've been stopped at quite a few mandatory police checks, and lights on has never been brought up. But I find that attempting to speak Thai, and having a Thai driver's license for car and bike help to bring a smile, salute, and a wave on. Gawd, I hope I didn't just jinx myself :o

yes the idea is to draw attention to you. there is a sign on the very dangerous road from Mae Hong Son to Pai, which instructs drivers to drive with lights on. Why do most Thai bike riders have their lights on??

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yes my 2 points too. speak a little thai and keeplights off in daytime. drive normally don't put lights on to draw attention to yourself

Putting lights on is exactly to draw attention to yourself. It's a requirement in Canada, seems to be in most of the US as well. Many years ago, a large interstate trucking company told its drivers to always have headlights on. Accidents were reduced by 25% and stayed at that level. Enough studies have been done to start convincing governments all over the world to do this. In my short time here, driving with lights on all the time, I've seen several cars on the opposite side start to come out to pass and then go back in - which I attribute (rightly or wrongly) to them actually being able to see me. Haven't been stopped yet for having the lights on. And I've been stopped at quite a few mandatory police checks, and lights on has never been brought up. But I find that attempting to speak Thai, and having a Thai driver's license for car and bike help to bring a smile, salute, and a wave on. Gawd, I hope I didn't just jinx myself :o

My thoughts about driving with the lights on were exactly the same until last month I picked up my new Vigo from Toyota. Within 3 minutes I was stopped by the Dum Ruat and fined. My offence was driving with the lights on during the daytime and driving in the right hand lane..... it seems daytime lights are reserved for emergency vehicles....and the right hand lane is not for owners with "red" number plates.

I still try to defy both rules but constant "hen pecking" from the wife has re-educated me.....to my dismay :D

i would suggest that the reason you were fined had nothing much to do with lights on or driving in the outside lane,

these were just any old excuse for extorting money from you. most Thai buses drive with lights on, as do motor bike riders and the 'red number plate' idea is also a red herring. Sorry about your 'hen pecking'

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yes my 2 points too. speak a little thai and keeplights off in daytime. drive normally don't put lights on to draw attention to yourself

Putting lights on is exactly to draw attention to yourself. It's a requirement in Canada, seems to be in most of the US as well. Many years ago, a large interstate trucking company told its drivers to always have headlights on. Accidents were reduced by 25% and stayed at that level. Enough studies have been done to start convincing governments all over the world to do this. In my short time here, driving with lights on all the time, I've seen several cars on the opposite side start to come out to pass and then go back in - which I attribute (rightly or wrongly) to them actually being able to see me. Haven't been stopped yet for having the lights on. And I've been stopped at quite a few mandatory police checks, and lights on has never been brought up. But I find that attempting to speak Thai, and having a Thai driver's license for car and bike help to bring a smile, salute, and a wave on. Gawd, I hope I didn't just jinx myself :o

yes the idea is to draw attention to you. there is a sign on the very dangerous road from Mae Hong Son to Pai, which instructs drivers to drive with lights on. Why do most Thai bike riders have their lights on??

Great tips for the new drivers... In regards to "Thai Bike Riders" - not just Thais... Our MC as well as many other riders (of various nationalities) ride with lights on in daylight hours (yes of course as well as at night! lol )

Chris

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An important after thought....

13. DRIVE TO CONDITIONS

This is an idea that is totally lost on all Thai drivers. They will drive at the same speed on a badly damaged road surface on a twisty mountain road, in a heavy rain storm, and at night, as they do on a dry smooth highway in the middle of the day. This is very important during the wet season as the roads and poorly drained which leaves big puddle areas where tyres can not disperse the water causing the wheels to 'plane' on top of the water and loose traction

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I thought I had read and disageed with elements of these words of wisdom before, I will now add FWIW my 2 Baht, note that is a new 2 baht coin's worth, ie golden. :D

Before you read this post - consider what checks you make you would make prior to a long trip (say +200km), I'll come back to this later....

Why have a car if you are going to self impose limitations on when and where you drive? Just get a driver or use the bus if that's the case. Driving at night: Fair amount of loonies on the road after dark but as there is generally less traffic they are easier to spot, also as it is dark between 18:30 and 06:30 every day you must only venture so far from home. Silly to avoid the night. Drive to the conditions - and this almost always means travelling at a speed that allows you to stop within a distance that you can see to be safe. If you plan to avoid contact with drunk drivers you will never leave the safety of your driveway. IMHO the most dangerous thing on Thai roads at night is a police man trying to stop +100kmph traffic with a small non-Maglite torch, in fact I told him what I thought of his ideas about road safety in a full and frank exchange of views, no fine (which surprised me) I'm sure he has been knocked down since then.

Not sure in what situation starting a journey after 11am has any benifit within Thailand. maybe the OP can enlighten me, I can't recall any large town or city, with the exception of Bangkok, within Thailand that takes anything more that 30 minutes to drive from the center to the outskirts or by-pass highways, anyone? Waiting for the traffic to get going later in the day doesn't seem a wise move if avoiding traffic is the objectve, the only limiting factor I have found with early starts is getting Thai family members motivated in the morning. Getting the city hassle out of the way before as the sun fully rises, then stopping for breakfast on the road, works for me but I accept we are all different. (edit) The end of the school day (3:30pm) will see the roads flood briefly with very young heads driving over loaded motorbikes without due care or awareness for either there own safety or that of their passengers or other road users. I am sure it is those that take risks at school age build an idea that it is their 'skill' that keeps them alive as they weave through traffic at speed to impress friends or would-be lovers, and that is nothing to do with motorists that brake hard or take other avoiding action to prevent hitting a child; however when the child grows up he (normally a 'he' but I've seen stupid girls too) finds that the safety that he enjoyed as a child has gone and I'm sure they have a higher fatality rate. (/edit)

Take a break each hour, I guess that depends on the driver. For me I run the tank down to 1/4 full and either stop for food, fuel or rest rooms. Take a siesta if need be but plan my trip so that I arrive to a particular time or avoid a location at a particular time, most often Bangkok city traffic unless I have to be there during business hours.

As for one place being worst than another, each has rights to a special mention but Pattaya deserves 1st place with the number of newbie holiday motorbike drivers with no idea of Thai driving laws or guidance code added to the confusion with directions and abuse of one way sois include it's status of holiday town with it's bars and entertainment places I think for a small area it has the highest death/accident rate in Thailand? (No sources.) I avoid Second Road on Friday and Saturday nights.

Regardless of the nation or type of road (off-road) that you are going to be travelling in/on there are practices that are important to consider (remember my question at the top of this post), I would suggest that even experianced drivers skip the primary checks I go through, so let's see if your first through was; 'Where are the car keys?', 'Do I have enough fuel?' or 'Are the passengers wearing selt belts?'

My first thought as I prepare for a longer drive is 'Am I fit to drive for that distance?', so long before you might get to a POWER checklist (Petrol, Oil, Water, Electrics, Rubber) and the state of the vehicle is the driver ready for the trip? Too tired, ill or drink impared?

Next is (IMHO) the weather, is it suitable weather to travel that distance given the roads and expected conditions. The answer to that I feel depends on what you are driving and where you are, my neice can't go to the market in her Jazz when it rains because of the muddy soi, not a good choice for rural Issan.

[Related experiance: I and other 4x4 drivers were pulled out of a three hour blockage on highway 4 some years ago while enroute to Phuket, the police where putting together a convoy of suitable vehicles to follow one of their lead pickups through some small villages across a shallow river crossing and along part of a beach to bypass a bridge that had been washed out, quite inspired policing I thought at the time. ]

Maps or GPS - do you know where you're going to?

I prefer papers maps but I'm old, and the ablility to use a pencil to mark a location etc. is prefered. Talking of paperwork, not only your insurance but also copies of the vehicle's 'blue book' and personal/medical insurance papers take up very little space and are things that you 'should' carry in the hope that you will never need them.

(Laminated map copies of frequent places are in the pickup all the time, avoid dog eared originals.)

As for other stuff you might carry in the hope that you don't need it, hands up if you have a first aid kit in the car? OK - very good, keep your hand up if you know how to use it? :D

I give myself a black mark next, I currently don't carry a fire extinguisher - maybe I should get one of those Thai exploding balls. :o

Things I've found at home and put in the pickup last weekend, reflective jacket and one of those chemical glow in the dark rods, goes along with some cotton gloves stored with the stuff for changing a wheel, spare bottle of water and some lemon sented hand wipes. Keep 'em where you need 'em - stops them being 'lost' to your passengers.

Since I was involved in pulling some people out of a wrecked car on a mountain road in Southern Spain many years ago I've always carried a heavy knife and torch in every car I've owned or rented. In Thailand this is ideal for cutting down small trees to lay in the road in lieu of warning triangles.

I've written far too much, but will close asking how many people have the contact telephone numbers for Highway police (1193) programmed into your mobile phone? Seen it so many times on the roads but did you make a note?

What are your thoughts on this subject - avoiding straight driving habit type pointers?

Edited by Cuban
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Traffic in Thailand really makes westerners looks stupid as a whole when it comes to driving. Look at how big our street and highways are with the exception of places like innercity newyork wash dc those very tight streets and densely populated areas. After driving around BKK I felt stupid for having been involved in 2-3 accidents(in The US) myself. There are also a surprisingly low amount of accidents in Thailand.

Driving slowly? depends on where you are but for the most part you go as fast as you want to(even in Bkk), just respect everyone around you and do not be wreckless or even negligent.

Driving at night is alot of fun. the city looks great and is a blast to drive at night, just cruise...

If you speak Thai well, there is no reason you should not speak to an official in Thai as it will make them feel a bit more comfortable speaking in their native language.The best thing to do about police is marry someone related to a relatively high ranking person(s)

in the military or police force.

The blind corners flashing high beams and beeping horn I def agree with.

Never drive alone, I agree partially.

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Traffic in Thailand really makes westerners looks stupid as a whole when it comes to driving. Look at how big our street and highways are with the exception of places like innercity newyork wash dc those very tight streets and densely populated areas. After driving around BKK I felt stupid for having been involved in 2-3 accidents(in The US) myself. T]here are also a surprisingly low amount of accidents in Thailand. [/u]

Driving slowly? depends on where you are but for the most part you go as fast as you want to(even in Bkk), just respect everyone around you and do not be wreckless or even negligent.

Driving at night is alot of fun. the city looks great and is a blast to drive at night, just cruise...

If you speak Thai well, there is no reason you should not speak to an official in Thai as it will make them feel a bit more comfortable speaking in their native language.The best thing to do about police is marry someone related to a relatively high ranking person(s)

in the military or police force.

The blind corners flashing high beams and beeping horn I def agree with.

Never drive alone, I agree partially.

T]here are also a surprisingly low amount of accidents in Thailand ...... read on

10 killed, 25 injured in road accident in Kalasin

Kalasin - A six-wheel truck modified for passenger transportation plunged into a construction hole on a road here early Sunday morning, killing 10 and injuring 25 others.

The truck driver and five others passengers died at the scene and four more died at a hospital.

The truck was transporting friends and relatives of a bridegroom from Yasothon to attend his wedding in Chaiyaphum when the accident occurred on the Kalasin-Roi Et Road in Kamalasai district at 2:30 am.

The hole was dug to build pillars of a bridge. Police said the driver apparently did not notice the construction site and did not put a brake on when the truck plunged down and hit into the pillars. Many passengers were pieced with steel bars of the poles.

The Nation

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so 1 accident is counter proof of low accident stats is it no? Duh!

for bkk I tend to think the same way - given the amount of vehicles, pedestrians & buddha knows what on & around the roads I'm amazed I don't witness more carnage.

also driving 'defensively' will only put one at odds with the general flow of traffic - 'skill' & 'alertness' is key though while speed doesn't matter as much as 'conditions'.

In fact if driving 'defensively' I'd never make it out from the village entrance to the dual-carriageway as most times of the day as no one cares to stop to allow cars to cross the road & enter the 'freakshow' on the 4 lanes!

only 1 rule really count here: show where you wanna go e.g. change lane & do it asap - don't wait for anyone to give some breathing space - won't happen often enough - just take your space the Thai way (cars will only stop for you if there's a chance they'll be 'hurt' otherwise).

no accidents so far of 1year++ in bkk mainly, but going most places incl. touring isan incl. khon kaen & actually didn't notice anything particularly bad out there? surely notice as soon as leaving bkk (the 100km rule LOL!) & what a breeze it is :o

cheers!

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  • 2 weeks later...
so 1 accident is counter proof of low accident stats is it no? Duh!

for bkk I tend to think the same way - given the amount of vehicles, pedestrians & buddha knows what on & around the roads I'm amazed I don't witness more carnage.

also driving 'defensively' will only put one at odds with the general flow of traffic - 'skill' & 'alertness' is key though while speed doesn't matter as much as 'conditions'.

In fact if driving 'defensively' I'd never make it out from the village entrance to the dual-carriageway as most times of the day as no one cares to stop to allow cars to cross the road & enter the 'freakshow' on the 4 lanes!

only 1 rule really count here: show where you wanna go e.g. change lane & do it asap - don't wait for anyone to give some breathing space - won't happen often enough - just take your space the Thai way (cars will only stop for you if there's a chance they'll be 'hurt' otherwise).

no accidents so far of 1year++ in bkk mainly, but going most places incl. touring isan incl. khon kaen & actually didn't notice anything particularly bad out there? surely notice as soon as leaving bkk (the 100km rule LOL!) & what a breeze it is :o

cheers!

ok Duh.

how about 5,000 accidents including deaths on Thai roads on one day during Songkran. Hope you do not become a statistic

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I have driven and ridden around Thailand for the quite a number of years (and around France, England, Dubai and Australia over the last 17)... I guess I am fortunate never to have had an accident of any kind (except dropping a loaded VFR400 when going too slowly up a curb).

My GF lives 600km away and I have done the round trip Lampang - Nakhon Pathom well over 20 times. I have always nearly done it at night too - never had a problem. In act, I came back the other day during the day and found the heat and extra traffic more of a pain.

I am in good physical shape and I like driving. I am not very defensive, but I am very alert and rarely 'zone out'. I rarely drive slower than 100 kph, rarely faster than 120. I highly recommend downloading large numbers of podcasts and listening to them - I reckon boredom is the long distance driver's enemy.

Around Thai towns (after driving in Dubai, admittedly in an M5) I find the traffic SO SLOW and dithering it is quite frustrating! However, I guess slow and generally steady was better than in Dubai where fast and reckless seemed the order of the day for most people. When in a car, the bikes are a nightmare - but hey, TIT!

For the record me'lud, I actually enjoy driving in Thailand compared to developed countries - it is more engaging and more interesting.... maybe that will change should I have an accident. Until then, be safe and be happy.

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  • 2 weeks later...
I have driven and ridden around Thailand for the quite a number of years (and around France, England, Dubai and Australia over the last 17)... I guess I am fortunate never to have had an accident of any kind (except dropping a loaded VFR400 when going too slowly up a curb).

My GF lives 600km away and I have done the round trip Lampang - Nakhon Pathom well over 20 times. I have always nearly done it at night too - never had a problem. In act, I came back the other day during the day and found the heat and extra traffic more of a pain.

I am in good physical shape and I like driving. I am not very defensive, but I am very alert and rarely 'zone out'. I rarely drive slower than 100 kph, rarely faster than 120. I highly recommend downloading large numbers of podcasts and listening to them - I reckon boredom is the long distance driver's enemy.

Around Thai towns (after driving in Dubai, admittedly in an M5) I find the traffic SO SLOW and dithering it is quite frustrating! However, I guess slow and generally steady was better than in Dubai where fast and reckless seemed the order of the day for most people. When in a car, the bikes are a nightmare - but hey, TIT!

For the record me'lud, I actually enjoy driving in Thailand compared to developed countries - it is more engaging and more interesting.... maybe that will change should I have an accident. Until then, be safe and be happy.

I hope your luck holds

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I prefer driving at night. I think it's safer because less cars are on the road. Long drives such as the one I have done a few times (Chiang Mai to Hua Hin, Chiang Mai to Phuket, Chiang Mai to Pattaya, Chiang Mai to Udon Thani, Bangkok to Chanthaburi) are best done at night.

Edited by kudroz
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I'm surprised no one has mentioned the problem that many have of not turning on lights at sundown and night....Or all they turn on are those little parking lights which should only be used for parking! Do they feel they are saving the battery or something or are they just unaware? Lights are turned on here much later than is generally done in the states........

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