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Search Is On For Missing Dutch Husband Of Malaysian Wife Found Murdered In Thailand


sriracha john

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A. Fairos Ahmad Sulaiman’s remains were found in a septic tank.

Lawyers to track down dead woman's hubby, son

KUALA LUMPUR: Lawyers for the family of A. Fairos Ahmad Sulaiman, who was found murdered in Thailand late last year, will seek the assistance of the Foreign Ministry to track down her husband and 3-year-old son.

Lawyer Noraishah Shamsuddin, who has taken up the case pro bono, said she and her partner would be meeting Wisma Putra officials tomorrow morning.

She said her law firm, Noraishah, Yasmin and Associates, will hand over all information and details they have on the case to the officials.

She said they were seeking government help to gain the assistance of their counterparts in Holland and Thailand to investigate the murder and track down Fairos' husband and son.

"We are also compiling more information to hand over to the police," said Noraishah. She said she had received information that Fairos' son, Johan Sebastian, had been seen in Holland.

"However, the information is 50-50. I really need confirmation on the information. The source told us that Johan was spotted at an unidentified location."

Noraishah said she is working with the source to track down the whereabouts of Johan who was last seen in Thailand along with Fairos' Dutch husband, Lambertus Den Dulk.

Fairos had been listed as missing in November 2007. Late last year, Thai police contacted Fairos' mother, Marthiah, when they found skeletal remains at the rented house where the family of three had been living in Thailand.

The remains, found in a septic tank in the house in the province of Ranong, were identified as that of the 37-year-old Fairos.

Marthiah said family members were expecting Fairos' remains to arrive at the Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Sepang on Wednesday.

The 63-year-old ustazah said she was still clueless about what had happened and is worried about her grandson.

Meanwhile, Deputy Inspector-General of Police Tan Sri Ismail Omar said police were working closely with their Thai counterparts and Interpol on the case.

- The New Straits Times (Malaysia) / 2009-02-02

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I hope they get the guy, maybe the Dutch police can assist. Things are pretty well organized in Holland, if you want to live somewhere you have to register. It is possible but would be hard to stay in the country without leaving some sort of paper trace. Its much easier to stay in an asian country without leaving a paper trace.

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Its much easier to stay in an asian country without leaving a paper trace.

Are you saying the Dutch system and paper trail works a bit better than a similar Thai law that requires foreigners to register their presence within 24 hours of arriving at each new location to the local police as well as the one that requires citizens to register their truthful residence in a blue book? I would have thought these would be practically infallible in tracking people down.

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Its much easier to stay in an asian country without leaving a paper trace.

Are you saying the Dutch system and paper trail works a bit better than a similar Thai law that requires foreigners to register their presence within 24 hours of arriving at each new location to the local police as well as the one that requires citizens to register their truthful residence in a blue book? I would have thought these would be practically infallible in tracking people down.

As I understand it, No check is made on addresses given on arrival. No national computer system on 90 day reports. No instigations of checking on breaches of 90 days.

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I hope they get the guy, maybe the Dutch police can assist. Things are pretty well organized in Holland, if you want to live somewhere you have to register. It is possible but would be hard to stay in the country without leaving some sort of paper trace. Its much easier to stay in an asian country without leaving a paper trace.

As a Dutch person you can sign out in Holland but you do not have to register yourself at the Dutch Embassy in Thailand if you don't want to.

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I hope they get the guy, maybe the Dutch police can assist. Things are pretty well organized in Holland, if you want to live somewhere you have to register. It is possible but would be hard to stay in the country without leaving some sort of paper trace. Its much easier to stay in an asian country without leaving a paper trace.

As a Dutch person you can sign out in Holland but you do not have to register yourself at the Dutch Embassy in Thailand if you don't want to.

I know im Dutch.

But what i mean is that in the article it states his kid is seen in Holland. So he might be there too. That was why i talked about the Dutch system.

As for the Thai system we all know that they dont check it. And if you dont come up for your 90 days reports (i would not if i was a murderer) its hard for them to find you.

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Its much easier to stay in an asian country without leaving a paper trace.

Are you saying the Dutch system and paper trail works a bit better than a similar Thai law that requires foreigners to register their presence within 24 hours of arriving at each new location to the local police as well as the one that requires citizens to register their truthful residence in a blue book? I would have thought these would be practically infallible in tracking people down.

You should see the letters of law firms i get at my current address for other people who registered mobile phones or other things. I believe its quite easy to give up a false adress in Thailand. Almost every week we have one of those letters from a law firm addressed to someone we do not know and it is not the same person all the time either. Once they even came here to repossess a scooter from someone we have never heard of. We are the second owner of this house, the first owner sold it to my wife.

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Its much easier to stay in an asian country without leaving a paper trace.

Are you saying the Dutch system and paper trail works a bit better than a similar Thai law that requires foreigners to register their presence within 24 hours of arriving at each new location to the local police as well as the one that requires citizens to register their truthful residence in a blue book? I would have thought these would be practically infallible in tracking people down.

You should see the letters of law firms i get at my current address for other people who registered mobile phones or other things. I believe its quite easy to give up a false adress in Thailand. Almost every week we have one of those letters from a law firm addressed to someone we do not know and it is not the same person all the time either. Once they even came here to repossess a scooter from someone we have never heard of. We are the second owner of this house, the first owner sold it to my wife.

Yes, I know. We get debt payment demand letters as well as phone calls at our house constantly... for the person that sold their ownership of the house, that is our current residence, six years ago.

My initial post above was completely facetious.

Edited by sriracha john
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I hope they get the guy, maybe the Dutch police can assist. Things are pretty well organized in Holland, if you want to live somewhere you have to register. It is possible but would be hard to stay in the country without leaving some sort of paper trace. Its much easier to stay in an asian country without leaving a paper trace.

As a Dutch person you can sign out in Holland but you do not have to register yourself at the Dutch Embassy in Thailand if you don't want to.

If I recall correct the Dutch don't have an ID card, so it will be very difficult to track him. Secondly the Dutch juridical system never arrests its own citizens for crimes committed abroad. And last but not least they never extradite somebody to country who have the death penalty, this is so for every EU country.

If I'm wrong my Dutch neighbours can always correct me

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I hope they get the guy, maybe the Dutch police can assist. Things are pretty well organized in Holland, if you want to live somewhere you have to register. It is possible but would be hard to stay in the country without leaving some sort of paper trace. Its much easier to stay in an asian country without leaving a paper trace.

As a Dutch person you can sign out in Holland but you do not have to register yourself at the Dutch Embassy in Thailand if you don't want to.

If I recall correct the Dutch don't have an ID card, so it will be very difficult to track him. Secondly the Dutch juridical system never arrests its own citizens for crimes committed abroad. And last but not least they never extradite somebody to country who have the death penalty, this is so for every EU country.

If I'm wrong my Dutch neighbours can always correct me

Let me correct you:

- we do have a ID card its been there for a couple of years already

- Dutch citizens do get arrested for crimes comitted in other countries

- not sure about the extradite part

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I hope they get the guy, maybe the Dutch police can assist. Things are pretty well organized in Holland, if you want to live somewhere you have to register. It is possible but would be hard to stay in the country without leaving some sort of paper trace. Its much easier to stay in an asian country without leaving a paper trace.

As a Dutch person you can sign out in Holland but you do not have to register yourself at the Dutch Embassy in Thailand if you don't want to.

Having yourself signed out of the Netherlands is not a problem, however, if you do not want to pay any more taxes and premiums in that country, you have to prove that you are living somewhere else, outside NL

So, if the authorities really want to find you, possible.

Going back to Holland, and having a Dutch passport, your passport will only be checked if arriving by air from outside the EU.

And that happens in all the countries of the EU.

After that, you are allowed to travel freely through all the countries of Europe.

If you want to rent or buy a house in Holland, then you have to be registered as living in Holland.

If you kip in with friends, rent room or flat without registering, well, you can stay of of sight for a very long time.

However, if someone is on a search list, it becomes more difficult to stay hidden, a mobile phone, an ATM-card, are all give-aways.

I agree, if he dunnit, get the bastard.

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Its much easier to stay in an asian country without leaving a paper trace.

Are you saying the Dutch system and paper trail works a bit better than a similar Thai law that requires foreigners to register their presence within 24 hours of arriving at each new location to the local police as well as the one that requires citizens to register their truthful residence in a blue book? I would have thought these would be practically infallible in tracking people down.

That interpretation of Thai Immigration Law is correct, but like all laws in place worldwide are open to abuse !!! For example their is a large number of overstays in Thailand, normally they don't comply with any immigration laws and if they have to deal with authorities at local level then it is done in a way that is acceptable in Thai / Asian culture.

What I'm simply saying is it is very easy to stay in Thailand undetected, I personally am a legal immigrant but I do have friends in country who are LONG-TERM (fact) overstay, and I'm not talking a couple of months, so detection like anywhere and anything else has it's limits ..........

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Before:

insidepix1-2.jpg

A. Fairos Ahmad Sulaiman’s remains were found in a septic tank.

And After:

body1.jpg

Fairos' brother A. Rahimi Ahmad Sulaiman was close to tears yesterday after claiming Fairos' remains.

Fairos' remains buried next to her grandfather

The skeletal remains of A. Fairos Ahmad Sulaiman, found in a septic tank in Thailand, were buried last night in her hometown in Kampung Temong Hilir, Enggor.

Fairos was listed missing in November 2007. Her remains were flown back from Bangkok on flight MH785 in the afternoon and were collected from the MasKargo office in Sepang by her younger brother, A. Rahimi Ahmad Sulaiman, 35.

Rahimi, who was accompanied by the family's lawyer, Noraishah Shamsuddin, and several relatives, broke down when the white sealed box containing his sister's remains were handed to him at 3pm.

"I last met her in 2005, at a family function in Ipoh. I never expected to see her like this now," he said.

The 35-year-old back-up manager for the National Sports Council's badminton squad said their mother, Marthiah Saadiah Mat Piah, would be relieved now that her daughter was buried here. "Mum cried almost every night thinking of Fairos' fate and hoped that her remains could be laid next to my grandfather's grave. Finally, she's got her wish."

Rahimi said that the family would continue to seek justice for Fairos' murder.

"Whoever did this to her must pay. If it's the husband, then my family will fight all the way to gain custody of my sister's son."

Noraishah urged the Thai authorities to speed up investigations into the case.

Rahimi and Noraishah also thanked Wisma Putra for the assistance it rendered to the family in bringing Fairos' remains home.

Fairos, 37, her Dutch husband, Lambertus Den Dulk, and their son Johan Sebastian, now 5, had lived in the house in Ranong where her remains were found recently by new tenants who had moved into the house.

Thai police contacted her family here after failing to locate her husband and son.

Fairos' mother was asked to go to Thailand for DNA tests and the results proved that the remains were those of her daughter.

In an earlier report with the New Straits Times, Marthiah said her daughter contacted her on Nov 8, 2007, to tell her she had had an argument with her husband and that she was returning home the next day with her son.

But she never returned to Malaysia.

Marthiah managed to speak to Lufti and Johan after her daughter's disappearance, but was told that Fairos had left for Malaysia.

Thai police said Lufti returned to the Netherlands a week after Fairos' disappearance.

Her family said he was spotted in a small town called Benthuizen.

- The New Straits Times (Malaysia) / 2009-02-04

==========================================================================

For our Dutch members, is there anything at all in the Dutch press about this man, their son, or this case?

Edited by sriracha john
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Before:
insidepix1-2.jpg

A. Fairos Ahmad Sulaiman’s remains were found in a septic tank.

And After:

body1.jpg

Fairos' brother A. Rahimi Ahmad Sulaiman was close to tears yesterday after claiming Fairos' remains.

Fairos' remains buried next to her grandfather

The skeletal remains of A. Fairos Ahmad Sulaiman, found in a septic tank in Thailand, were buried last night in her hometown in Kampung Temong Hilir, Enggor.

Fairos was listed missing in November 2007. Her remains were flown back from Bangkok on flight MH785 in the afternoon and were collected from the MasKargo office in Sepang by her younger brother, A. Rahimi Ahmad Sulaiman, 35.

Rahimi, who was accompanied by the family's lawyer, Noraishah Shamsuddin, and several relatives, broke down when the white sealed box containing his sister's remains were handed to him at 3pm.

"I last met her in 2005, at a family function in Ipoh. I never expected to see her like this now," he said.

The 35-year-old back-up manager for the National Sports Council's badminton squad said their mother, Marthiah Saadiah Mat Piah, would be relieved now that her daughter was buried here. "Mum cried almost every night thinking of Fairos' fate and hoped that her remains could be laid next to my grandfather's grave. Finally, she's got her wish."

Rahimi said that the family would continue to seek justice for Fairos' murder.

"Whoever did this to her must pay. If it's the husband, then my family will fight all the way to gain custody of my sister's son."

Noraishah urged the Thai authorities to speed up investigations into the case.

Rahimi and Noraishah also thanked Wisma Putra for the assistance it rendered to the family in bringing Fairos' remains home.

Fairos, 37, her Dutch husband, Lambertus Den Dulk, and their son Johan Sebastian, now 5, had lived in the house in Ranong where her remains were found recently by new tenants who had moved into the house.

Thai police contacted her family here after failing to locate her husband and son.

Fairos' mother was asked to go to Thailand for DNA tests and the results proved that the remains were those of her daughter.

In an earlier report with the New Straits Times, Marthiah said her daughter contacted her on Nov 8, 2007, to tell her she had had an argument with her husband and that she was returning home the next day with her son.

But she never returned to Malaysia.

Marthiah managed to speak to Lufti and Johan after her daughter's disappearance, but was told that Fairos had left for Malaysia.

Thai police said Lufti returned to the Netherlands a week after Fairos' disappearance.

Her family said he was spotted in a small town called Benthuizen.

- The New Straits Times (Malaysia) / 2009-02-04

==========================================================================

For our Dutch members, is there anything at all in the Dutch press about this man, their son, or this case?

Have not read anything about it but will check in the files what I can find.

David

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Its much easier to stay in an asian country without leaving a paper trace.

Are you saying the Dutch system and paper trail works a bit better than a similar Thai law that requires foreigners to register their presence within 24 hours of arriving at each new location to the local police as well as the one that requires citizens to register their truthful residence in a blue book? I would have thought these would be practically infallible in tracking people down.

That interpretation of Thai Immigration Law is correct, but like all laws in place worldwide are open to abuse !!! For example their is a large number of overstays in Thailand, normally they don't comply with any immigration laws and if they have to deal with authorities at local level then it is done in a way that is acceptable in Thai / Asian culture.

What I'm simply saying is it is very easy to stay in Thailand undetected, I personally am a legal immigrant but I do have friends in country who are LONG-TERM (fact) overstay, and I'm not talking a couple of months, so detection like anywhere and anything else has it's limits ..........

its extremely easy to remain here undetected, protected even if one has the right contacts and the necessary fee

in all the years I have come using my European passport I have never filled out the address section , and ignore the income, job one's..only been questioned about it a few time's.

As for registering- nobody I know does this either with their embassy, nor thai authority's.

Some have been here nearly 30 year's.

The laws in holland seem to be changing a little- getting tougher

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Any photos, links, or translations please?

In the meantime, this article evidently appeared just prior to the one I have posted above.

Lufti spotted in Dutch town with his son

KUALA LUMPUR: The husband and son of murdered Kelantan woman A. Fairos Ahmad Sulaiman are believed to be living in a small town called Benthuizen in Holland.

Information received by lawyers for Fairos' family revealed that her Dutch husband Lambertus Den Dulk and their 3-year-old son, Johan Sebastian, have been living in the town since they returned from Thailand.

Lawyer Noraishah Shamsuddin said the father and son were spotted in the town of 3,000 people.

"Our source is already on the ground. We are compiling the information before handing it over to Interpol and Wisma Putra. We need to confirm the facts and information before further action is taken."

Noraishah said checks with the Thai police showed Lufti had returned to Holland a week after Fairos went missing. Fairos last contacted her mother, Marthiah Saadiah Mat Piah in Kuala Kangsar, Perak on Nov 8, 2007, to say she was returning home the following day with her son.

Then, Fairos called again at midnight saying Lufti had beaten her and that she would be taking the train to Kuala Kangsar with Johan in the morning.

She had also instructed her mother to lodge a police report, if she did not return in a week's time.

Fairos' remains will arrive here this afternoon. The body will be claimed by her 34-year-old brother, A. Rahimi Ahmad Sulaiman and Noraishah at 2.15pm at the MASkargo office near the Low Cost Carrier Terminal in Sepang.

Noraishah said other family members, including Marthiah, would also go to claim the body. She said the remains were sent by the Malaysian embassy officials based in Bangkok, Thailand.

Marthiah said the remains would be taken to their hometown at Kampung Temu Hilir in Kuala Kangsar and buried immediately.

The 63-year-old ustazah also wants to see justice done regarding Fairos death.

"I do not know what really happened and how my daughter died. I want to know the truth and the killer to be punished."

The skeletal remains of Fairos, 37, was found in a cemented septic tank at the house where she had lived with her husband and son in Ranong, Thailand, since 2004.

- The News Straits Times / 2009-02-03

Edited by sriracha john
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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi,

This is Kat and Mike. Anyone out there from Ranong who remember us? If so, send us a private message.

Also, when was the Dutch embassy informed? I emailed them several months ago about this but never got a reply. You think they could have done something.

Apart from all this, Bert may reading Thaivisa along with all of us.

We knew Rose and she was a great lady. We hope Bert gets what he deserves.

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No update at all in any media I could find. No information from the Netherlands over whether the missing husband or the victim's son have ever been found there or that the authorities there are looking for them.

For our Dutch TV members: Are their any updates on this case in the Dutch press?

The husband is involved as at least a person to question if not a direct suspect. You'd think the Dutch police would want to determine his level of involvement.

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Before:
insidepix1-2.jpg

A. Fairos Ahmad Sulaiman’s remains were found in a septic tank.

And After:

body1.jpg

Fairos' brother A. Rahimi Ahmad Sulaiman was close to tears yesterday after claiming Fairos' remains.

...

before & after comparisons come in many variations. the parody and persiflage of it is almost a genre. the way it's done here has a certain je ne sais quois.

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