Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Is it possible to buy a compost bin in Thailand? We've tried Global House and Thai watsadu here in Mahasarakham but no luck. We've also tried a couple of other small shops but no luck there either. An large plastic water barrel with the bottom cut off has been suggested so I may have to try that. I could make one or more accurately get on of the family to do it but I just thought if I could buy one I might save myself some trouble.

I'm not a keen gardener or any sort of gardener for that matter but I just want to stop the piles of food waste that end up outside the kitchen and other places.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think that you will be able to find a compost bin in Thailand. I've never seen one. So you will probably have to make one yourself.

Kitchen waste doesn't compost so well unless there is a fair amount of green vegetable matter in there.

You could try the bokashi method, but I think that you would have to make the starter yourself as I haven't seen it here.

Bokashi is made using EM

http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/215246-effective-micro-organisms/

What I do with my kitchen waste.

I have a 20 litre bucket that has some water mixed with a small glug of EM. As long as there is rice in the kitchen waste, you don't need to add anything else. If for some strange reason, you don't have waste rice then add some molasses or brown sugar.

Add your kitchen waste once a day and gently push down with a hoe or whatever will do the trick. Minimal agitation is important as you want to introduce as little air as possible.

You could use a plastic bag roughly the same size as the bucket partly filled with water as a sort of lid. This will push the kitchen waste below the surface and exclude air,

What you will see is a white, sort of webby film on the surface after a few days. If you use the water filled plastic bag, it may be stuck to the bottom of it. This is good, if you see a black mould forming, then discard the waste and clean the bucket.

When you cannot fit any more waste into the bucket (don't worry if it overflows when adding waste), tip the water into another bucket gently so as to introduce as little air as possible. This water can be used as the starter for the next batch, but probably only 3 or 4 times. Add this waste to your compost bin.

Overflow water can be used to water your garden, but should be diluted around 500:1 or it can be thrown where nothing is growing at the moment, but only if you see the white growth

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think that you will be able to find a compost bin in Thailand. I've never seen one. So you will probably have to make one yourself.

Kitchen waste doesn't compost so well unless there is a fair amount of green vegetable matter in there.

You could try the bokashi method, but I think that you would have to make the starter yourself as I haven't seen it here.

Bokashi is made using EM

http://www.thaivisa.com/forum/topic/215246-effective-micro-organisms/

What I do with my kitchen waste.

I have a 20 litre bucket that has some water mixed with a small glug of EM. As long as there is rice in the kitchen waste, you don't need to add anything else. If for some strange reason, you don't have waste rice then add some molasses or brown sugar.

Add your kitchen waste once a day and gently push down with a hoe or whatever will do the trick. Minimal agitation is important as you want to introduce as little air as possible.

You could use a plastic bag roughly the same size as the bucket partly filled with water as a sort of lid. This will push the kitchen waste below the surface and exclude air,

What you will see is a white, sort of webby film on the surface after a few days. If you use the water filled plastic bag, it may be stuck to the bottom of it. This is good, if you see a black mould forming, then discard the waste and clean the bucket.

When you cannot fit any more waste into the bucket (don't worry if it overflows when adding waste), tip the water into another bucket gently so as to introduce as little air as possible. This water can be used as the starter for the next batch, but probably only 3 or 4 times. Add this waste to your compost bin.

Overflow water can be used to water your garden, but should be diluted around 500:1 or it can be thrown where nothing is growing at the moment, but only if you see the white growth

Thanks for that. I was getting the feeling that I would be out of luck with the bin but I thought it was worth a try.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am sure I have seen plastic compost bins here in Isaan. Home Buy in Ubon I think.You can always use a garbage bin and cut the bottom out. The challenge will be to get people to use it without dumping everything in there.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

On 6/25/2013 at 6:15 AM, IsaanAussie said:

I am sure I have seen plastic compost bins here in Isaan. Home Buy in Ubon I think.You can always use a garbage bin and cut the bottom out. The challenge will be to get people to use it without dumping everything in there.

I was thinking of a bin but you're probably right about training the family.

I had a similar problem with the fridge. Cheese and beer in the freezer compartment. Frozen food removed so it thawed out.

"Why can't you put cheese in the freezer"

"I don't know why just trust me you don't"

A nightmare.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The main problem,I ended up giving up,I had everything placed so she didn't have to walk ten steps,still didn't work,so much more fun to burn it, sigh .

Sent from my iPad using ThaiVisa app

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I am sure I have seen plastic compost bins here in Isaan. Home Buy in Ubon I think.You can always use a garbage bin and cut the bottom out. The challenge will be to get people to use it without dumping everything in there.

It's OK. Just pick through the plastic detritus, the rest is really good compost.rolleyes.gif it's what we have just done. 'And 3 days later BSF. Not possible I said, I've never seen a fly.....we've had the top on the whole time! (honest Gov) Na na, lets get this clear, big bodied, pointy headed, energetic, (bad) photos? Wifey won't go near the bin. (good sign)

How do you want these suckers IA?

Really, I've never seen the parents. The bin was put down and never exposed, except for the time it took to dump the leavings.

The MO for BSF is to lay the brood near the heap, something Darwinian? (wriggle or die, bas tards)smile.png

Anyway, here's the (bad ) photos. Any more pixels and it'll cost ya......at least a beer...or two?? I know, I'm pushing it.

I can deliver these bad boys for 3 beers......and that's my final offerrolleyes.gif

Regarsd...ermm, rewarding myself already...

Edit: Any Inter-Provincial livestock moving tea-mon......ermm, taxes are down to you?

I'll post a few more photos.....these Lanna imposters are everywhere....

Regards.

post-25023-0-64963800-1372692890_thumb.j

post-25023-0-26245200-1372692954_thumb.j

Edited by teletiger
Link to post
Share on other sites

To be specific I pinned a piece of plastic mozzie net to the corner of the garden and used that. Getting some lovely stuff out of it now that it is going.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

If it's just veggie scraps you have why not have a worm bin?

Very easy to set up, and maintain, and the worms are easy to get hold of too.

How do I get hold of the worms? I presume they are not 'yer common earth worm.

Regards.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Dont forget to put some 'composting' earth worms in, they will eat and convert the waste to excellent compost, but do not put onions or citrus into the bin. And keep the light out.

Edited by oldsailor35
Link to post
Share on other sites

There's a guy who has a worm farm in Kon Khaen, ships them all over. Also try this http//.www.pennworms.com

He is at Roi Et

Edited by oldsailor35
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

No, not common earth worm. Red wriggler is what I have, but I think there's a couple of others you can use also.

Worms are available from Chiang Mai easily, if you're based in the North?

If not there's a couple of guys on here can supply them (put them on a bus to you). Do a search for vermicompost and look for the username the worm guy.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the replies. Looks like there's so good information there.

I going back to the UK on 23 July for a few months so I'll have to wait until I get back. The time seems to go by so quickly when I get to about 3 weeks away.

Anyway thanks again.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Worms are available from Chiang Mai easily, if you're based in the North?

Where exactly in Chiang Mai? I've asked at a few garden centres and just got puzzled looks.smile.png

Regards.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Mae Jo University. They have an agricultural dept. that have been studying worm composting for 15 years. They can make the bin for you if you don't have one, or advise on how to do it. (Though there's plenty of info on the Web for that). And they sell vermicompost also.

Not much English spoken. So take a Thai speaker if you need to.

Worms are 500 B per kilo.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I was looking for a compost bin in Ubon the other day and the best I could find was a large plastic 115 litre waste bin which had a locking lid and also a smaller 6 inch lockable lid that would be perfect to dump waste in. It was only 499 baht. I was going to buy it and drill holes in the bottom.

Unfortunately they only had one in stock and it was broken! They said they will get more in stock within the next 2 weeks.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

I was looking for a compost bin in Ubon the other day and the best I could find was a large plastic 115 litre waste bin which had a locking lid and also a smaller 6 inch lockable lid that would be perfect to dump waste in. It was only 499 baht. I was going to buy it and drill holes in the bottom.

Unfortunately they only had one in stock and it was broken! They said they will get more in stock within the next 2 weeks.

That sounds like it might work. I would think you'd need to make some access at the bottom so you could remove compost from the bottom rather than the top.

Edited by kimamey
Link to post
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Buy a couple concrete rings 1 meter+ in diameter and stack them. Lawn trimmings, weeds from the flower beds, kitchen scraps. Make sure to bury the kitchen scraps into the existing composting matter to eliminate flies. I am using two sets of rings so I can shift the contents from one to the other for better mixing.

post-52561-0-56434700-1375496356_thumb.j

post-52561-0-31968300-1375496427_thumb.j

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was looking for a compost bin in Ubon the other day and the best I could find was a large plastic 115 litre waste bin which had a locking lid and also a smaller 6 inch lockable lid that would be perfect to dump waste in. It was only 499 baht. I was going to buy it and drill holes in the bottom.

Unfortunately they only had one in stock and it was broken! They said they will get more in stock within the next 2 weeks.

I bought this bin to use as a compost bin a few weeks ago. It is a 30 gallon drum.

I guess it will work, we'll wait and see. I filled it in about a week with just all the leaves and some grass cuttings from my lawn. I keep adding the fruit/veg cuttings every few days. It's either breaking down or just compacting as the level of the contents is lower every few days.

With it being a bin it's easy to roll it around and tip upside down every few days to mix up the contents but it's not easy to break up or stir everything inside. I'm considering emptying the contents onto the road, cutting it up further and completely mixing it all and then putting it all back into the bin again.

I think it would have just been better to make a compost area using 4 wooden pallets in the corner of my garden, but being rainy season it would probably get too wet.

Anyways, for a compost bin this one from HomePro for just 499 baht is the best choice I could find. The smaller compartment door on the top is ideal for just dropping in more contents instead of opening up the lid each time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I was looking for a compost bin in Ubon the other day and the best I could find was a large plastic 115 litre waste bin which had a locking lid and also a smaller 6 inch lockable lid that would be perfect to dump waste in. It was only 499 baht. I was going to buy it and drill holes in the bottom.

Unfortunately they only had one in stock and it was broken! They said they will get more in stock within the next 2 weeks.

You can get good bins of this capacity at Makro for ฿117.- (in Buriram). Composting materials need air (oxygen) moisture and warmth. So go easy on putting the lid on and maybe put a perforated PVC tube down the middle.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Buy a couple concrete rings 1 meter+ in diameter and stack them. Lawn trimmings, weeds from the flower beds, kitchen scraps. Make sure to bury the kitchen scraps into the existing composting matter to eliminate flies. I am using two sets of rings so I can shift the contents from one to the other for better mixing.

Fredge, a coupla Q's if I may:

1. Is your bottom ring closed at the bottom? - what about elevating it with some bricks etc and bottling any liquid run-off as liquid fertiliser?

2. Do you cover the top? My big concern is the flies. My first attempt in a plastic bin produced a smelly mess of the buggers. We only have about 10m from where I'll be placing the compost bin to the back door, so this is a priority. - I've tried spraying with vinegar to reduce them, which works.

3. I see your mixing from one set to the other. I'd like a system where you can pull out a tray of the best from the bottom ... wondering how to do that with rings.

4. Do you use worms?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Buy a couple concrete rings 1 meter+ in diameter and stack them. Lawn trimmings, weeds from the flower beds, kitchen scraps. Make sure to bury the kitchen scraps into the existing composting matter to eliminate flies. I am using two sets of rings so I can shift the contents from one to the other for better mixing.

Fredge, a coupla Q's if I may:

1. Is your bottom ring closed at the bottom? - what about elevating it with some bricks etc and bottling any liquid run-off as liquid fertiliser?

2. Do you cover the top? My big concern is the flies. My first attempt in a plastic bin produced a smelly mess of the buggers. We only have about 10m from where I'll be placing the compost bin to the back door, so this is a priority. - I've tried spraying with vinegar to reduce them, which works.

3. I see your mixing from one set to the other. I'd like a system where you can pull out a tray of the best from the bottom ... wondering how to do that with rings.

4. Do you use worms?

I'll go through your questions as you listed them... makes it easier for me to figure out what I'm saying...

1. The rings are not closed on the bottom. My thoughts are that if you have liquid draining from the compost bin then you're way too much on the wet side. The bacteria that you're getting to do their great work are aerobic (oxygen loving) so a lot of moisture is self-defeating. When starting a new batch I usually take some stems of woody plants and make a layer (4 - 6") at the bottom to help on ventilation.

2. I have never had any issue with flies breeding in my compost bins. When adding kitchen scraps, dropped fruit etc I dig a hole into the compost and cover the added material with material being composted (grass clippings and the like). If the flies can't get to the new material then they can't be laying their eggs. Also, if the bin is doing its thing properly the material is way too hot (I'm told up to 160F) for any eggs of flies to survive. I have also used the garbage bin method to good success. Cut some 3 - 4 cm holes (maybe 4 or 5) around the base of the bin. Same goes for about half-way up the sides. Layer your scraps with some soil from the garden and make sure additions are buried. I cover my larger bins with a couple of sheets of corrugated roofing (see the pic in my previous post). Keeps the rains, village chickens etc out. Helps keep evaporating moisture in, especially important during the dry season.

3. You need to understand that the material being composted needs a couple of stirrings while the process runs its course. Goes for these larger bins as well as a garbage bin. Yes, it's good exercise and a dirty job but worth the effort. I usually give a couple of though stirs in the same bin I started the batch, usually when I'm adding a larger volume of material such as lawn clippings. This evens out the moisture levels as the sides tend to dry out more than the center. When the batch is pretty well finished I fork it over into the other bin for a final aerating and then rest. When #1 is ready for shifting I empty #2.

I happen to have a nice little hammermill for chopping up orchard trimmings and the like. I run the completed compost trough that machine to break down any larger pieces. I've noticed that even after I bag this finished compost I will get a bit of final heat. No seeds sprouting, no grubs but just beautiful black gardener's gold.

Simply pulling out a tray won't do it as the composting is not a process that occurs evenly throughout the bin.

4. I don't even try to use worms in this system as the heat would kill them off. When a batch is cooking well you cannot stand to put you hand down into it. Don't expect any worm I want in my garden to withstand that! ;-)

Hope that I haven't confused the issue with my long explanations. The effort is well worth the time and sweat.

Edited by fredge45
Link to post
Share on other sites

Saw several compost bins in Homepro (Khon Kaen mall) last week.

I am actually looking for a small kitchen compost bin. Haven't seen them anywhere.

post-108506-0-57441300-1376322656_thumb.

Edited by cardholder
Link to post
Share on other sites

Get yourself a black rubbish bin (clip down lid) from Big C, Tesco, etc....199 Baht. Punch the bottom out of it. Set it down somewhere convenient to the kitchen.(grassy and shaded) Fill it with your vegetable kitchen waste, as it appears. It will populate itself.

I started one 6 weeks ago;The plan is to lift it 30/45 cms off the ground, move it 60cms sideways plop it down again. Inspect contents. I expect to get at least 30 cms compost. Anything not ready will just get shovelled back on top in the bin.

Pray to God you don't live anywhere near IsaanAussie and that it gets populated with BSFs. (Black soldier flies)smile.png

I started a worm farm about a month ago. 2 kilos of red wrigglers with all they could eat. The BSFs are outpacing them 3 or 4 to 1, at least. Early days for the reds, I understand. 'And they are starting to get into their stride. But those BSFs are something else. "No onion, citrus of garlic? <deleted> that. Bring it on"."Nom, nom, nom.....".

'And the parent flies are totally benign. Keep other flies at bay.

OMG....I'm a BSF fanboy.biggrin.png

Results, with photos, tomorrow.

Regards.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...