Jump to content

Update on land ownership by Thais married to farang and luk khreungs


Recommended Posts

My understanding is that a Thai National, regardless of marital circumstances, and regardless of whether they have a farang second name can purchase and own land in Thailand. My understanding, also, is that a luk khreung, provided they havea Thai parent, a Thai Birth Certificate and a Thai ID card, and are therefore a Thai National, can do the same. Is this true for every Jangwat? Have heard of some 'discrepancies'!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's the law. However about, I think it was 15 years ago, when the law was changed so that Thai women married to farangs could own property, I know some provinces would not put the property in their names. I haven't heard of anything like that happening in years.

It has never been a problem in Chiang Mai as long as your wife has Thai citizenship and has never renounced it.

The same for your children regardless of their last name. If they are Thai citizens they can own land.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I seem to remember the year 1999 being mentioned as the year the law changed, or about then. This is similar to what someone else has posted.

However, I also remember another law that change only 4 or 6 years ago. that refers to the Thai partner purchasing land in his/her name that they could never have earned or owned the money to do so. It gives the Thai authorities the right to seize such property under certain circumstances. I am sure this was put in place to cover some extreme cases with huge amounts of money laundering or some-such and does not to affect the circumstances of the average Farang Joe & his Thai wife. Naturally, if the Thai partner has lived & worked overseas for some years then they had the opportunity to engage in wealth gathering on their own account off-shore & probably makes it much more plausible that they earned at least part of the money. I am quite sure that it did come into law not too many years ago. Probably blocking potential loopholes to abuse that came from the other law (1999???) change. Specifically, I am sure the c1999 law change takes account of the implications of dual citizenship which is now not discriminated against. (It used to be.) Do not take my word for it but check it out with your lawyer if the sums are very large or if you want to be sure. Free legal advice from unqualified sources is worth exactly what you paid for it.

Edited by The Deerhunter
Link to comment
Share on other sites

You might strike some land office officials with a personal agenda perhaps. Not saying definitely, just maybe - when my daughter applied for a Thai ID card the official refused it, saying only people who speak Thai can get. (i.e., real Khon Thai.) Luckily my wife had a contact higher up the chain who got it sorted.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Interesting, my daughter never had a problem getting Thai ID card in Hang Dong and she cannot speak Thai very well. In fact the officials just kept giving it the 'Luk Soway' bit and were more bothered if the picture was 'Na Lak' or not. As for buying, we have never had a problem as long as I signed the paper saying I have no rights to the land everyone is happy.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.









×
×
  • Create New...