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Grafting Durian, Avocado


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I am just starting to read about grafting.

What I'm going to attempt is bark grafting durian, soursop and avocado onto a tree I'm going to saw. The old tree is some local thing that grows very quickly.

Now, I may have this totally wrong but can I just take a cutting from the top of my Durian, Soursop, Avacado and stick them in the bark?

All suggestions welcome even how idiotic what I'm doing is.

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I think you need to go back to the drawing board; grow some seedlings of your desired trees than study how to harvest the scions and what is the best time to graft for each individual species.

Most will not grow on just any old garden tree, they need their own kind.

Come back for advice when ready

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it wouldnt hurt just to try it,

i think its a good idea, and if people never tried things people would still think the earth was flat,

go for it and keep us informed, i might even try it myself,

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it wouldnt hurt just to try it,

i think its a good idea, and if people never tried things people would still think the earth was flat,

go for it and keep us informed, i might even try it myself,

Yeah I think I will - all three on the same tree, although I believe durian doesn't grow so well in Isarn. It might just when grafted on a tree that rows well.

But as soidog suggested, more study is needed.

I'm I right in thinking "mud can be used to cover the cut tree trunk? I read somewhere anything that seals it is ok - maybe some spare'body filler'I have from fixing my car?

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No.it all has to do wirh male and female plants.....not a stupid idea merging two killer fruits.......wow......imagine a pungent avo that weighs three pounds........i will invest Pm me.

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youve got me interested ive just been on you tube for half a hour looking at grafting trees,

ive got the fast growing trees in our garden part as shade trees,

im going to have a go tomorow at grafting a mango into it, and a durion,

ill have a go at anything me,

ill post pics tomorow,

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I think you need to go back to the drawing board; grow some seedlings of your desired trees than study how to harvest the scions and what is the best time to graft for each individual species.

Most will not grow on just any old garden tree, they need their own kind.

Come back for advice when ready

Soidog2 is right; you need to graft onto the same species of tree:

"Multiple Grafts

The trick to creating a multiple fruit-bearing tree is to graft several compatible varieties or species onto the same rootstock. This is easiest when using bud grafting, since the rootstock experiences less shock. Compatibility is determined by the species of fruit trees you wish to graft together. Generally speaking, they need to be very closely related for the graft to take successfully. Sometimes, incompatible grafts may survive past the initial stages, but they eventually fail.

Compatible Species

Most fruit trees are compatible within their species, but many are also compatible within their genus. That means that Prunus species such as plums, nectarines and peaches can be grafted onto the same tree. Apples and crabapples are often grafted together to create a tree that can self-pollinate and prolong the apple harvest. Another common "fruit salad tree" is created when many types of citrus are combined on a single rootstock.

Grafting Fruit Salad Trees

The grafting procedure most commonly used for fruit salad trees is known as budding. In this method, buds are harvested from donor trees and kept moist to encourage them to swell before they're slipped into a slit in the rootstock's bark and nestled against the constantly growing cambium layer inside. The bud is then taped or banded into place until it begins to show signs of new growth. Multiple branches can be added at one time using this method, since it causes very little stress to the rootstock. New branches can even be grafted onto existing trees with a simple budding technique.

Why Compatibility Matters

The fact that grafts between incompatible trees fail, often immediately, is widely understood, but the mechanism behind this failure is harder to see. At the cellular level, two trees are attempting to communicate and merge their vascular systems to make a single structure. No exchange of DNA takes place, but the rootstock does require similar cells for a healthy connection. The bud forms a callous on the cut side almost immediately as the rootstock's xylem cells are at work attempting to grow over the bud. After several weeks, the bud is completely surrounded by the rootstock's tissues, and the nutritional transport systems begin to join. If the rootstock finds tissues that it cannot communicate with because of cellular or chemical incompatibilities, the graft fails and the bud dies from starvation."

Edited by drtreelove
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hi guys,

i havnt got round to doing the grafting yet to busy,

but i was telling my wife about it,,

and she said can do many things,

she said can grow veg in banana tree,,,,

i said what,,

she said ill show you tomorow,

well i was down at the pigs,, my wife came and said ill show you about veg in banana,

she got a little stick, made some small holes in the banana trunk and put a cow pat seed in each one, i stood there looking and thought well i never,

today,, they are only growing, ill take some pics when they are bigger,

but i thought what a great idea, keeps them away from the chickens and ducks,

the things you learn here,, like the old saying your never to old to learn, and you never stop learning,

jake

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PigeonJake,

What is a cow pat seed?

Was it in a growing banana plant? Not one that had been cut down?

Banana stems certainly hold a lot of moisture that they bring up from relatively deep in the soil during dry periods.

Sounds interesting and I look forward to seeing the pics.

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PigeonJake,

What is a cow pat seed?

Was it in a growing banana plant? Not one that had been cut down?

Banana stems certainly hold a lot of moisture that they bring up from relatively deep in the soil during dry periods.

Sounds interesting and I look forward to seeing the pics.

hi loong,

its chinees cabage,

here is some pics of them doing it, they are growing, they have put in chinees cabage,lettuce,long been, they are to small at the moment to take a pic, but they are growing,

what my wife does it put a hole in the banana trunk and just pop a seed in,

i thought it was great,

like i say the things you learn

heres the pics

more when the plants are big enough,

post-32351-0-71840700-1428815532_thumb.j

post-32351-0-27727100-1428815568_thumb.j

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post-11421-0-41554800-1428847134_thumb.j

Grafted my durian, soursop, mango, cranberry and avocado.

Made a mixture of mud with a bit of cement thrown in to seal the cut tree. - fingers crossed!

post-11421-0-52854200-1428847208_thumb.j

post-11421-0-63337700-1428847259_thumb.j

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PigeonJake

I don't know if they call chinese cabbage something different in your area, I call it puk gaht kaow.

Whatever the seeds' name, this is intriguing. I am going to have to try this myself. Shame that it is a bit late for the really hot and dry period now. Obviously the banana leaves would give the young seedlings a bit of shade.

Very interesting, please keep us updated with more pics.

This is probably one of the most interesting contributions on the forum lately.

Maybe you should start your own thread with the progress, so that it doesn't hijack this thread and will be easier to find with a search

Edited by loong
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attachicon.gif20150411_174825.jpg

Grafted my durian, soursop, mango, cranberry and avocado.

Made a mixture of mud with a bit of cement thrown in to seal the cut tree. - fingers crossed!

attachicon.gif20150411_172304.jpg

Good Luck, please post regular updates including the Thai or scientific name of the rootstock.

Haven't a clue the name of the root stock but I'll try to find out. This isn't really a serious attempt to graft but more a project to learn about the process.

On reflection, I think the cement was a bad idea because o some of the additives - lime etc?

Reading up about scion wood right now.

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Yes not such a good idea, tar would be slightly better but not recommended.

Use tape to seal grafts and just white wash the rootstock top / protect the main cut from the sun and bugs.

I use parafilm grafting tape to wrap scions, works like a charm.

(if you do your cuts right)

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