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Junta orders ‘will continue to rein in citizens’ even if democracy returns


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Junta orders ‘will continue to rein in citizens’ even if democracy returns
By PIYAPORN WONGRUANG,
WASAMON AUDJARINT
THE NATION

 

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BANGKOK: -- POLITICS will see some positive signals in the coming months but citizens’ civil and political rights will remain leashed as the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO) continues to have a stranglehold on society, political experts said at a seminar paying tribute to late former premier and noted law scholar Sanya Dharmasakti at Thammasat University yesterday.

 

Heads of government offices, meanwhile, were called for a government briefing on changes that would occur at their offices following the charter promulgation.

 

Noted political academic Prinya Thaewanarumitkul said political processes would become clearer after the charter promulgation, including the enactment of the 10 necessary organic laws for a general election as well as the election date.

 

Prinya, an assistant professor at Thammasat University’s Faculty of Law, said the Constitution Drafting Commission would have eight months to complete the laws, four of which are necessary to hold the election. Taking into account the time the National Legislative Assembly (NLA) will spend deliberating on these laws, plus five months after the promulgation, the election could be held around September or October next year.

 

Prinya said at this point three political scenarios have emerged: A natural parliamentary process; some major parties joining NCPO representatives to form a government; and two major parties joining hands against NCPO cronies.

 

The professor suggested that the NCPO should allow parliamentary work after the charter promulgation to proceed naturally so that the country could have a chance to return to democracy with the least conflict.

 

Political observers believe the NCPO may want to prolong its hold on power by having representatives in the Lower House, in addition to its 250 appointed senators. Prinya said based on past records, no major party would win a majority. But the NCPO could win enough seats in Parliament to influence key decisions such as the selection and election of a prime minister, which needs two-thirds votes in Parliament. If the NCPO wished to control the Lower House, it may need to have either Pheu Thai or the Democrats to be on its side to back its appointed 250 senators. 

 

The other possibility is of these two major parties joining hands working together against the NCPO”s representatives. 

 

History shows that such hybrid formulas don’t work, as politicians would rather work against each other rather than cooperate, and the consequence is severe conflict, which spreads, he said.

 

Prinya suggested that the junta contemplate on the issue as the scenarios are already in sight.

 

“I understand that the NCPO may not have made any decision at this point but these are all paths that we can see now, which would affect future politics [selection of an outsider prime minister]. So, I think they should not get involved with the formation of a government and instead let the country’s free voters decide the future. This is the only way for the country to return to democracy with the least conflict,” said Prinya.

 

He said people should have a supreme rule – to live together. They should fix their own problems so that coups would have no chance in Thai society again.

 

Kitti Prasertsuk, director of the university’s East Asia Studies Institute, said the new charter may have helped send a positive signal to foreign countries but still they would rather wait and see when the election actually takes place before making their responses known.

 

The assistant professor said the charter in general may be seen as not serving people’s rights as expected but he said individual parts need scrutiny. As far as commitment to foreign countries is concerned, he said this charter was more flexible and allowed the government to make commitments overseas, compared to the previous controversial Article190, which required strict scrutiny by Parliament.

 

Yingcheep Atchanont from ilaw said the new charter may restore some rights to the people but they would still be under the grip of hundreds of NCPO orders that would remain in place until there are regulations to abolish these orders. In addition, other mechanisms, including the NCPO, would continue until the country has a new government.

 

Some new proposals and mechanisms addressed in the charter, including the national strategy, reform, and others, were unclear as to the extent of public participation, he said.

 

Meanwhile, permanent secretaries and heads of all the government offices were called for a briefing on the changes that would occur in the bureaucratic administration.

 

Some critical laws that would lead to penalties being levied on them if they failed to incorporate into their work, including the public hearing law, and the anti corruption law, were notified to them so that they could prepare themselves for some drastic changes at their offices.

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/news/national/30311437

 
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-- © Copyright The Nation 2017-04-06
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2 hours ago, webfact said:

He said people should have a supreme rule – to live together. They should fix their own problems so that coups would have no chance in Thai society again.

A nice thought, but it won't happen while bad behavior is rewarded by the Thai Army. 

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Democracy Lite.

 

Tastes great, less filling.

 

Half the rights, at twice the price.

 

 

Junta orders ‘will continue to rein in citizens’ even if democracy returns

 

If?

 

Not a good sign.

 

 

Edited by mtls2005
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Okay I'm up to the chapter on democracy in my hefty tome on SE Asia which states 'the people (of SE Asia) prefer security over liberty'. So unless the current junta do something truly outrageous (notice their backpedalling on 'unpopular issues/edicts' from the Krabi coal fired plant and now the riding in pickups) they're here to stay. Under whatever guise. The government you deserve and all that.

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8 hours ago, webfact said:

The professor suggested that the NCPO should allow parliamentary work after the charter promulgation to proceed naturally so that the country could have a chance to return to democracy with the least conflict.

 

Only in your dreams I pick option number 2 in the above statement if the parties involved grow a pair. 

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10 hours ago, webfact said:

He said people should have a supreme rule

Should have but never have had nor will have with the 2017 Constitution.

Supreme rule means that ALL elements of Thai society adhere to and are bound by common rights and liberties such as those prescribed by a constitution. But when parts of society operate with extrajudicial privilege through wealth and physical power, "supreme rule" in their hands is "absolute rule."

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10 hours ago, webfact said:

If the NCPO wished to control the Lower House, it may need to have either Pheu Thai or the Democrats to be on its side

No!

This is a total failure in understanding the new dynamics that the mixed member apportionment system (MMA) designed by the NCPO-appointed CDC brings to elections. Or maybe just forgotten? Nowhere else in the world is the MMA used but the junta has decided to experiment with it in the next elections. Why?

 

The MMA suppresses the advantage of big political parties like the Democrats and PTP. Rather the MMA favors

the medium-sized parties who can compete in a large number of constituencies nationwide, but who have been unable to capture a large share of party list votes in the past. https://asiancorrespondent.com/2016/02/the-effects-of-thailands-proposed-electoral-system/#0S5pXzbjLTRmBl6I.97

 

Given the wealth and military power of the NCPO, it could make a substantial electoral difference for the smaller medium-sized parties attendant with greater loyalty to the NCPO than one might find with large parties. Such dire lack of influence on the election outcome may explain Democrat Party Leader former PM Abhisit's adamant support for all things NCPO. He may fear becoming irrelevant to the NCPO in the next election. On the other hand Suthep has split from the Democrat leadership and might be capable of launching a medium-sized party in the South. Considering Suthep's apparent close historical relationship with military coupe leadership, his party might be an attractive electoral vehicle for NCPO.

 

 

 

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7 hours ago, steven100 said:

well if the Junta stop the control then what do you think would happen ?

are people / farangs here so naive ....   :coffee1:   I'm glad the Junta run the place ... it's alot better than before .

 

If the junta kept out of politics and manipulating the judicial system, maybe it could function like any normal civilised country.

 

Yes people, even alien farangs are naive, especially those who promote being silenced, suggest the place runs better without their input and at the same time expect their opinion to have any weight.

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1 hour ago, sawadee1947 said:

Is there any fool who would expect that the junta would withdraw power in order to establish democracy?

The junta is constantly doing a foolishness test on the Thai citizenry. Its rather like the mirror mirror on the wall mythology. They constantly chum the waters to see if the Thai's are taking the bait. 

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The Junta is keeping things under control ... no violence ...  no bombings ... no road blockages ... no mass protests ...

 

What is wrong with that   !!!!!!!     you farangs have really gone democracy crazy .... Australia is run democratically .... and looked how faarkd it is ....

 

I like the Junta ... I like Thailand ....   maybe the complainants should leave, maybe they would be happier in their home country.

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2 minutes ago, steven100 said:

The Junta is keeping things under control ... no violence ...  no bombings ... no road blockages ... no mass protests ...

 

What is wrong with that   !!!!!!!     you farangs have really gone democracy crazy .... Australia is run democratically .... and looked how faarkd it is ....

 

I like the Junta ... I like Thailand ....   maybe the complainants should leave, maybe they would be happier in their home country.

Maybe some farangs maybe need to reconsider where they want to live and under what government. If you don't like the current Junta ... move and get on with it .... stop complaining every time... it gets a bit much .... just move,  it's not going to change in a hurry thats for sure.

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53 minutes ago, steven100 said:

Maybe some farangs maybe need to reconsider where they want to live and under what government. If you don't like the current Junta ... move and get on with it .... stop complaining every time... it gets a bit much .... just move,  it's not going to change in a hurry thats for sure.

Many have already done so and more probably will.  Even the backpackers complain about the current state of Thailand being far more tense and unpleasant.  You may be happy, but a great many Thais elected leader who was deposed.  What of their happiness?  Is everyone who voted for Yingluck a violent bomber ?  The junta can claim few achievements and will install a Hong Kong style democracy where only the cronies and entitled will succeed, leaving the common Thai to continue to struggle.  The violence you speak of was minimal at best.  Your fellow Thais have far more restraint than you give them credit for.     

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On 4/6/2017 at 4:20 PM, steven100 said:

The Junta is keeping things under control ... no violence ...  no bombings ... no road blockages ... no mass protests ...

 

What is wrong with that   !!!!!!!     you farangs have really gone democracy crazy .... Australia is run democratically .... and looked how faarkd it is ....

 

I like the Junta ... I like Thailand ....   maybe the complainants should leave, maybe they would be happier in their home country.

no elections. 

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On 4/6/2017 at 5:20 AM, steven100 said:

The Junta is keeping things under control ... no violence ...  no bombings ... no road blockages ... no mass protests ...

 

What is wrong with that   !!!!!!!     you farangs have really gone democracy crazy .... Australia is run democratically .... and looked how faarkd it is ....

 

I like the Junta ... I like Thailand ....   maybe the complainants should leave, maybe they would be happier in their home country.

Yes, isn't repression a wonderful thing!

 

You know North Korea is even more under control.  Perhaps you would be happier there.

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On 4/6/2017 at 5:20 AM, steven100 said:

The Junta is keeping things under control ... no violence ...  no bombings ... no road blockages ... no mass protests ...

 

What is wrong with that   !!!!!!!     you farangs have really gone democracy crazy .... Australia is run democratically .... and looked how faarkd it is ....

 

I like the Junta ... I like Thailand ....   maybe the complainants should leave, maybe they would be happier in their home country.

I wasn't aware that Australia was "faarkd".  Perhaps you can convince them to pass on democracy and accept military rule.

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