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Making an ideal electrical T


canopy

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What are ways to make electrical T's in the pictured case? There is a large conduit above a wall containing several 220V romex cables. Take now for instance a cable that goes through this conduit and drops down to each outlet in its circuit (slides down through a pvc conduit embedded in the wall). What are some good ways to make T's so cable can run down to each of these outlets? Hoping there is something simpler than mounting a classic junction box every place a T is needed.

 

outlet2.jpg

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I think the junction boxes are the way to go, that's what I did when wiring the shed. So in this case I would have 2 off T boxes and an end box. Run the supply cable thru the T boxes to the end box, then run the cables from the T boxes and end box to the power plug. You can buy these big plastic terminals to connect the wires together in the boxes. If you're working on the earth wires in the T box, strip the 3 wires and place the exposed metal together and twist on the plastic connector.

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Any connection will need a box to house it anyway.

 

Twisted connections with wire-nuts are the standard Thai solution, if done properly it's fine.

 

Otherwise you could use Wago push-connectors, just strip the wire and push it in, much easier to get right and far faster.

 

These chaps, you can get them here but Ebay is a good friend.

 

773_wallnuts.jpg

 

 

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Again, I hope to get some better ideas other than mounting a classic junction box above every single place there is an outlet because it seems unnecessary overkill for this type of application. Was hoping something simple to snap over the connection would be available like the below picture. Another possibility would be to run the cable back up the wall to eliminate the T altogether. Comments on these or other ideas welcome.

 

 

et.jpg

Edited by canopy
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Any connection will need a box to house it anyway.
 
Twisted connections with wire-nuts are the standard Thai solution, if done properly it's fine.
 
Otherwise you could use Wago push-connectors, just strip the wire and push it in, much easier to get right and far faster.
 
These chaps, you can get them here but Ebay is a good friend.
 
773_wallnuts.jpg
 
 

Yes, I should have used these Wago connectors, looks like it would have been a lot easier.

Sent from my SM-J700F using Thaivisa Connect mobile app

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If the conduit droppers are big enough you could do it the British way, run the wire down to the outlet then back up, puts all the joints in accessible places (behind the outlets) but uses more wire if you are dropping to each outlet.

 

We have horizontal conduit running between the outlets on each wall, just one dropper per group.

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Well, gentlemen, these may be great methods. As I said before I didn't use these methods.

One 'spanner in the works' with these methods is that you may have a bricky breathing down your neck waiting to lay all he can 555.

So, I ran 3 long cables (active, neutral, earth) to the end of the runs in conduit and and race (what ever I had left over from the house). I then installed the junction boxes at each power point feed, pre-bricky. So when the bricky (well he wasn't really, just a drunk), came he layed the blocks, cut the channel in them, and I installed the conduites.

When they did the render, I just fed the wires down from the junction boxes to the power/ switch outlets.

This was my first go-it-alone wiring job, and I didn't want the brick gang held up by me.

 

Sent from my SM-J700F using Tapatalk

 

 

 

 

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I found the perfect product, but must buy it from the US apparently. Product description:

 

Use this splice tap kit in place of a junction box for splicing 12 or 14 awg (300 volt), 2-conductor nm cable with ground. Many contractors and homeowners doing Wiring in a house have found this kit easier to use than a traditional exposed junction box.  This splice can be hidden behind a wall. This product is UL & CSA listed and it is NEC compliant.

 

 

junction3.jpg.27e048dc512e9e2445506f8b26cbb379.jpg

 

 

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Wago connectors need to go in some form of secondary protection (a box), the exposed cores would need to anyway. Wagos are a fast replacement for wire-nuts.

 

The Tyco splices are insulation displacement / piercing, not a technique I particularly like (not permitted in the UK, but neither are wire-nuts).

 

They likely work just fine but at 20A they are on the line for an outlet circuit, I'd put the circuit on a 16A breaker.

 

I bet they're not exactly cheap :sad:

 

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1 hour ago, canopy said:

Does the 20A rating Tyco specifies assume/require one is using 120V?

 

The current rating doesn't change with the voltage. It would be 20A @ 12V or 1,200V (if the insulation didn't break down of course).

 

The amount of power that 20A could provide would vary, 240W @ 12V, 2,400W @ 120V or 4,400W @ 220V.

 

 

 

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