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Weak education holds back Thailand in worldwide human-capital index


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Weak education holds back Thailand in worldwide human-capital index

By The Nation

 

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File photo // The Nation photo

 

Thailand has performed better than the average for its income group in the new World Bank Human Capital Index.

 

Yet, it is still outperformed by three fellow Asean nations: Singapore, Vietnam and Malaysia – largely due to weaknesses in the Kingdom’s education system. 

 

Released on October 11, the index measures productivity of the next generation of workers relative to the benchmark of complete education and full health. 

 

Topping the index is Singapore, which scored 0.88 out of the possible 1. Coming second and third are South Korea and Japan. Hong Kong is ranked 4th while Finland sits in 5th spot. 

 

Thailand scored 0.6 and placed 65th among the 157 world territories.

 

The Human Capital Index measures the amount of human capital that a child born today can expect to attain by age 18, given the risks of poor health and education that prevail in the country where the child lives.

 

“Thai children can expect to complete 12.4 years of school by age 18. However, when years of schooling are adjusted for quality of learning, this is only equivalent to 8.6 years, a learning gap of 3.8 years,” the World Bank calculated.

 

The index has used five indicators: the probability of survival to age five, a child’s expected years of schooling, harmonised test scores as a measure of the quality of learning, adult survival rate (the fraction of 15-year-olds that will survive to age 60), and the proportion of children who are not stunted. 

 

Globally, 56 per cent of all children born today will grow up to be at best, half as productive as they could be; and 92 per cent will grow up to be, at best, 75 per cent as productive as they could be.

 

The index shows that children born in Thailand today will be 60 per cent as productive when they grow up as they could have been if they had enjoyed a complete education and full health.

 

“This is below the average for East Asia and Pacific region,” the World Bank noted. 

 

Thailand’s performance marginally improved over last year, with its score rising from 0.58 in 2017 to 0.60.

 

“Thailand has made great progress in expanding basic education and the rate of child stunting is low as a consequence of earlier government efforts,” said Mara K Warwick, World Bank country director for Brunei Darussalam, Malaysia, Philippines and Thailand. “However, greater emphasis on learning is needed to further equip a child born today with the skills and knowledge to be a productive citizen of the future.

 

“The Government of Thailand recognises this and is working with the World Bank to improve the efficiency of education expenditure in order to boost quality and reduce the inequity in educational resource allocation.”

 

World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim said human capital was a key driver of sustainable and inclusive economic growth, but investing in health and education has not received the attention it deserves. 

 

“The Human Capital Index creates a direct line between improving outcomes in health and education, productivity and economic growth. I hope that it drives countries to take urgent action and invest more – and more effectively – in their people,” he added. 

 

Source: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/detail/national/30356417

 
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-- © Copyright The Nation 2018-10-15
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6 minutes ago, webfact said:

Yet, it is still outperformed by three fellow Asean nations: Singapore, Vietnam and Malaysia – largely due to weaknesses in the Kingdom’s education system. 

The elite have been well aware of this for decades. They just do not want to do anything to improve it.

As soon as the general public start to think for themselves will be when an uprising starts.

 

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20 minutes ago, bluesofa said:

The elite have been well aware of this for decades. They just do not want to do anything to improve it.

As soon as the general public start to think for themselves will be when an uprising starts.

 

Recent history in Thailand shows exactly how they treat people if the Elite seem threatened.

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35 minutes ago, webfact said:

The index shows that children born in Thailand today will be 60 per cent as productive when they grow up as they could have been if they had enjoyed a complete education

I suspect the study is being generous here. There's alot more upside to thai lack of productivity than 40%. I'd say they are a fraction of a percent (like .5%) as productive as they would be.

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This validates what I'd said in a previous thread.
When my son graduated HS and went to collage in the US, without me, and primarily his Mom's tutoring I estimated he would have been at least two to three years behind a similar American High School student.

Thing is, as others have said, the elite in the Thailand like this.

A semi educated middle class, with a semi illiterate underclass, while they send their kids overseas for education!

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25 minutes ago, Esso49 said:

Recent history in Thailand shows exactly how they treat people if the Elite seem threatened.

The Elite here won't stand for their country being co-opted by the Western elite, which is what was happening through the Wests puppet Thaksin and his "coloured revolution".

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3 minutes ago, Chopperboy said:

The Elite here won't stand for their country being co-opted by the Western elite, which is what was happening through the Wests puppet Thaksin and his "coloured revolution".

What does that even mean?

 

As far as I remember, Thaksin was pretty much his own puppet master!

 

But back to education, this has been going on for decades.

As my wife rather wisely says, until there comes along a Thai version of Lee Kwan Yew, this will never change, and even if that mythical Thai prophet appears, we’ll all have turned to dust before it results in any change

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14 minutes ago, GinBoy2 said:

What does that even mean?

 

As far as I remember, Thaksin was pretty much his own puppet master!

 

But back to education, this has been going on for decades.

As my wife rather wisely says, until there comes along a Thai version of Lee Kwan Yew, this will never change, and even if that mythical Thai prophet appears, we’ll all have turned to dust before it results in any change

It potentially means a Fox News viewer. Not that there is anything inherently wrong with that, so long as people can separate fact from fiction. 

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5 hours ago, bluesofa said:

The elite have been well aware of this for decades. They just do not want to do anything to improve it.

As soon as the general public start to think for themselves will be when an uprising starts.

 

Its one of my theories as to why Thais are now more aggressive and arrogant than they were 10 years or so ago.

Social Media and the Internet have opened their eyes ( and minds ), and the frustration is clear to see in many citizens.

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Until they change the education model from indoctrination centers that concentrate on rote learning while discouraging risk taking and independent thinking, Thailand will continue to lag it's ASEAN neighbors.  That's not going to change anytime soon.

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6 hours ago, Chopperboy said:

The Elite here won't stand for their country being co-opted by the Western elite, which is what was happening through the Wests puppet Thaksin and his "coloured revolution".

Complete nonsense!

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9 hours ago, bluesofa said:

The elite have been well aware of this for decades. They just do not want to do anything to improve it.

As soon as the general public start to think for themselves will be when an uprising starts.

 

Perhaps the cycle of change, among the population, is already in the works. 

Instigated from themselves, not harbouring from the traditional institutions.

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To attain that world class education system you need to have people who can benefit from it. In my experience, most Thai teachers I have come across don't have the intellect or motivation to absorb knowledge, never mind the students.


Also bear in mind that the few studies into IQ in Thailand show a consistent 10% reduction in average IQ compared to Western countries. The three studies I know of show an average IQ of between 88 and 91, compared to the Western average IQ of 100. 


And also consider the anti-intellectualism inherent in Thai culture exemplified by their aphorism of 'khit mahk mai dee' - 'think too much no good'.

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3 hours ago, Cake Monster said:

Its one of my theories as to why Thais are now more aggressive and arrogant than they were 10 years or so ago.

Social Media and the Internet have opened their eyes ( and minds ), and the frustration is clear to see in many citizens.

I think you might have a point here.

 

I’m a little more skeptical about the social aspect. 

 

But that undereducated underclass have increasingly been traveling overseas to work. Be it legally in Canada, Sweden etc, or the huge numbers working illegally in South Korea and Taiwan, they have have started to actually understand whats going on.

 

My wife’s cousin came back from 4 years working in Canada a different woman. Her world view and a rather less deferential persona, to me at least that gave me hope that things could change.

 

In the old days, the elite could control the narrative. Thats beginning to change. 

The problem is, it's slow, and without a mindset change from the elite, it’s just going to result in more turmoil, coup upon coup as they try to maintain the status quo, as they battle the fact that the underclass finally are exposed to what life might be like.

 

I’d like to feel optimistic, but it’s hard to see how it pans out well, there are so so many structural issues, things that can’t be discussed, it’s hard see how they progress.

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I taught on and off over the last 10 years in the largest private school system in Thailand. Over that time I worked in 5 different cities, same school. They were all the same, nothing ever changed. Every new teacher was told "You are not here to teach, you are here to give the appearance of teaching." Thailand has the "all pass system" where a student can't fail. One year we had a student who could hardly print his name. His exams were a marvel of imaginative hieroglyphics. Not a single answer right, yet he passed. No wonder Thailand falls behind. All "improvements" are nothing but lip service.

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4 hours ago, quandow said:

I taught on and off over the last 10 years in the largest private school system in Thailand. Over that time I worked in 5 different cities, same school. They were all the same, nothing ever changed. Every new teacher was told "You are not here to teach, you are here to give the appearance of teaching." Thailand has the "all pass system" where a student can't fail. One year we had a student who could hardly print his name. His exams were a marvel of imaginative hieroglyphics. Not a single answer right, yet he passed. No wonder Thailand falls behind. All "improvements" are nothing but lip service.

I’m always glad, yet sad at the same time when an educator validates what I saw in practice.

I so regret not taking my son back to the US before he went to High School, it seriously would have made his transition to college easier.

 

The phrase you used “appearance of teaching” resonated with me a lot.

 

We used to go the parent teacher conferences. and I speak pretty fluent Thai, so it’s not like there was some ‘lost in translation’ thing going on, but I would sit there stunned listening to what these ’teachers’ were saying

 

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On 10/15/2018 at 9:14 AM, thequietman said:

Still ............. they got subs and what more does any growing child need, than a good sub or two?

 

Nothing to see here. 🙂

This is what they will look like after 3 days in service:

Thai%20U%20Boot_zpsxbukswxa.jpg

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8 minutes ago, Lupatria said:

This is what they will look like after 3 days in service:

Thai%20U%20Boot_zpsxbukswxa.jpg

I assume that's because it will be on the surface permanently - being a submarine with no submariners, probably following the aircraft carrier with no aircraft.

 

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18 minutes ago, bluesofa said:

I assume that's because it will be on the surface permanently - being a submarine with no submariners, probably following the aircraft carrier with no aircraft.

 

That won't be too hard, the aircraft has been docked in Sattahip harbour for as long as I can remember.

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On 10/15/2018 at 9:10 AM, webfact said:

Weak education holds back Thailand in worldwide human-capital index

This problem will eventually solve itself over time. The population of Thailand is predicted to go into decline in 2032. That rate of decline will increase rapidly as time passes. So in theory the population will ultimately decline to the point where there is no one left to teach and no one left to educate. 🙂

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7 hours ago, Cadbury said:

This problem will eventually solve itself over time. The population of Thailand is predicted to go into decline in 2032. That rate of decline will increase rapidly as time passes. So in theory the population will ultimately decline to the point where there is no one left to teach and no one left to educate. 🙂

If that happens, who'll make somdam, bokbok, spicy papaya salad?!?!?! 😉

 

On a more serious note; the old metaphor "the blind leading the blind" comes to mind. A few years ago I had a 30 hour course with Thai teachers. The aim was to teach them English so that they in turn could teach their students English. "English" aside, I have never in my life seen so many indifferent, incompetent adults in the same room. All they (the Thai teachers, not the students) wanted was to "play games". How can these people be entrusted with the task of teaching the next generation the skills and knowledge they need to make it in the 21st century? 

 

They are, and will remain, peasants for quite some time to come. 

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Interesting report and good news for the junta. Demonstrates that the military government knows what it is doing.

 

And now with the sacrosanct and untouchable 20 year plan Thailand can look forward to an almost 100% compliant and brainwashed populace.

 

A real feel good scrap of news. How wonderful to know that the current government has truly nurtured the cabbage mentality within the voting community to put the country where it belongs on the world stage.

 

The people of Somalia must surely be upset to lose a place in the world rankings.

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On 10/15/2018 at 10:10 AM, Chopperboy said:

The Elite here won't stand for their country being co-opted by the Western elite, which is what was happening through the Wests puppet Thaksin and his "coloured revolution".

A man who rode to power on votes made because he kept his promises to the poor?  The west might have liked that but it hardly makes him their puppet. I would say if he was a puppet to anyone other than his own greed and ego, it would have been to his wife's family historical aspirations.  Make Lana great again!  Which would have been fine as long as it was not at the expense of greater Thailand.

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