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Story Of My Thai Citizenship Application


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As we are nearly at the end of the year, it is time to tally up the numbers of newly minted Thais who were gazetted in 2012. According to my research there were 35 naturalisations under Section 10 and 77 women married to Thais who were granted Thai nationality under Section 9, giving a total of 112 for the year. I have excluded the many group naturalisations of formerly stateless minorities born in Thailand who also technically fall under Section 10.

The cumulative figures I have gathered since 2005 are as follows:

2005 Nat 50 W 68 Total 118

2006 Nat 10 W 232 Total 242

2007 Nat 141 W 236 Total 377

2008 Nat 163 W 44 Total 207

2009 Nat 0 W 4 Total 4

2010 Nat 7 W 145 Total 152

2011 Nat 40 W 8 Total 48

2012 Nat 35 W 77 Total 112

2005-12 Nat 446 W 814 Total 1,260

Avg p.a. Nat 55.75 W 101.75 Combined 157.5

Thanks for the good work and information, hope next year the process will be moe efficient and quicker. As things are changing in MOI.

An Update, MOI have just approved 46 women only, no man(Point to be noted) on 20th December 2012 in their official gazzette to get Thai citizenship. So the latest figure is, 2012 W 77+46=123 against M=35, Total=158

Thanks for the update.

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Hi All, For those who are interested, the application process for Thai Citizenship in my case went as follows: Late 2003 - Picked up the checklist from the Police Headquarters on Rama 1 Road Janu

Not sure why you chose to go through all this humiliation ! But you obviously had your reasons ! If you are from Africa or the Indian Sub-Continent or such, then Thai citizenship may be regarded as u

"Humiliation"? Sorry, I don't see whats humiliating about this . . . . . G

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Sorry the attached list of required docs is more complete than the one above. Obviously no need for items 1 & 2 if you don't have PR.

Arkady, thank you very much again for your very helpful information. I have had some time over the past couple days to look through most of the 26+ pages of this thread, and I noticed that many of the questions for which you (and others) provided me answers had already been answered previously. I appreciate your patience (and the patience of others) in answering my newbie questions.

Looking through your list of documents required, to me this list seems to apply to those who have gone the PR route, because alien registration book and certificate of residence is only provided with PR, correct? All the other required documents appear to be applicable to other cases (including my case married to Thai with Thai-born children). Do you know if the requirement to show personal income tax going back 3 years is required for applicants with Thai children, or is only 1 year required?

After reading through many of the postings, I am still unclear as to whether I need to apply at the Special Branch in Bangkok or at the Special Branch servicing the Province where I live (Phitsanulok)? In cases where the Special Branch field offices outside of Bangkok are unfamiliar with the process, are foreigners allowed or expected to apply in Bangkok, or are they just out of luck?

The law was only amended in 2008 to allow males with Thai wives to apply without getting PR first and they haven't bothered to make any clarifications in the list docs but docs that only apply to people with PR are obviously not required in that case. Everyone needs to show 3 years' notarised tax receipts and you must also be able to show you had a WP for the whole 3 years. Some people have been accepted by Special Branch with 3 years' tax receipts but without a WP for the whole 3 years, only to be rejected years later by the MoI. The Act specifically states that those resident in the provinces must apply to local Special Branch in their province. Special Branch in Bkk has been known to encourage people to get on a tabien baan in Bkk in order that they can process their applications. I don't know, if that could lead to problems later on, if the MoI notices that all your employment docs are from Phitsanuloke. Provinces like Pattaya and Phuket with a lot of resident foreigners can handle applications but I haven't heard of anyone doing it from Phitsanuloke. You should talk to Special Branch in Phitsunaloke and Bkk about this and take a view on where to apply. I remember someone saying on TV that Special Branch in Surat point blank refused to process an application because it sounded too troublesome to them, even though there are a lot foreigners in Samui.

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  • 3 weeks later...

We're do. Find the guide lines and rules to start the process , I would like to try. One question can I apply while I am traveling out side Thailand to work?

I just read more so an 0 visa does not qualify ? To apply?

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We're do. Find the guide lines and rules to start the process , I would like to try. One question can I apply while I am traveling out side Thailand to work?

I just read more so an 0 visa does not qualify ? To apply?

You can only apply in Thailand, despite some nonsense that is or was on the Foreign Ministry's website about applying at Thai embassies overseas. You have to apply in the province where you live, as indicated in your tabien baan, which you must have in order to be eligible. You need a work permit and must be working in Thailand, although of course overseas business trips are permitted. I don't think the regulations actually specify 1 year extensions because they are mainly framed for people with permanent residence. It may be possible with back to back 90 visas and work permits for at least three years but it would be a bit odd and there would have to be no gaps in the visas or work permits. Three years' of audited Thai tax receipts showing payment of salaries tax are also required.

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  • 2 weeks later...

A very helpful thread. I am eligible for everything except the charity donation.

How strict are they regarding the donation of money to charity? If they are strict, is it best to do it in one lump sum of 5,000 B or spread it out a bit?

Thanks in advance

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I do not think a single donation will cut it. Certainly, donations just before you apply are a no-no. The donations should be made quite some time before applying.

Over the years I have made many donations to this and that but never kept the evidence. As a result, I had to start from scratch, with evidence of donations starting about 18 months before filing the application. Please note that the donation should be made to registered charitable organizations.

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Thanks GarryP!

So start now and apply in 18 months is probably the only thing i can do. ho hum

I think you would be able to get away with 12 months. The document list I have, which was provided by SB, indicates simply that the donations should be a long time before and not simply for the purpose of naturalization, which would infer right before the application. Of a number of donation receipts I had avaialble, they only wanted a copy of the two latest ones.

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Thanks GarryP!

So start now and apply in 18 months is probably the only thing i can do. ho hum

I think you would be able to get away with 12 months. The document list I have, which was provided by SB, indicates simply that the donations should be a long time before and not simply for the purpose of naturalization, which would infer right before the application. Of a number of donation receipts I had avaialble, they only wanted a copy of the two latest ones.

Which registered organizations did you donate to? Can you name them? So as some of us could do donations as well there

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Thanks GarryP!

So start now and apply in 18 months is probably the only thing i can do. ho hum

I think you would be able to get away with 12 months. The document list I have, which was provided by SB, indicates simply that the donations should be a long time before and not simply for the purpose of naturalization, which would infer right before the application. Of a number of donation receipts I had avaialble, they only wanted a copy of the two latest ones.

Which registered organizations did you donate to? Can you name them? So as some of us could do donations as well there

I would rather not name it. I obtained a list of charities registered in Thailand, shortlisted the ones that I felt meant something to me and then picked the one which was most conveniently located for me. Shallow I know, but there it is. A link to a number of charities can be found at: http://www.thaicharities.org/index.htm

For your information there are 807 charities recognized by the Thai Revenue Department and for which donations are tax deductible. Here is a link to the page: http://www.rd.go.th/...sh/29157.0.html I used the list which I downloaded from this site.

Edited by GarryP
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Thanks GarryP!

So start now and apply in 18 months is probably the only thing i can do. ho hum

I think you would be able to get away with 12 months. The document list I have, which was provided by SB, indicates simply that the donations should be a long time before and not simply for the purpose of naturalization, which would infer right before the application. Of a number of donation receipts I had avaialble, they only wanted a copy of the two latest ones.

Which registered organizations did you donate to? Can you name them? So as some of us could do donations as well there

Some people have claimed that they identified charities that are looked on more favorably by the Ministry of the Interior folk but I don't think it makes any difference. You just need to find a registered charity or charities you like. I started donating and keeping the receipts for tax deduction long before I knew about this requirement for citizenship. Later I added some other charities, while continuing with the original one. In the end I submitted receipts going back well over 10 years but there was no comment from Special Branch - just ticked the box and moved on the next item.

I agree with others that probably one year is enough and I don't think they are looking for huge donations. They probably understand that many people don't keep the receipts without realising they might be useful beyond getting tax deduction and don't make an issue of this.

The Red Cross is a good stand by, if you have no other favourite charity. It is conveniently located in the centre of town and there are always staff on hand to take your donation and give you a receipt immediately with your full name written out in Thai. There are different parts or projects you can donate too, depending on your preferences and I think there are still donations staff there on weekends but better check this first. Why not donate some blood at the same time?

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  • 2 weeks later...

Does anyone know if naturalized Thai citizens are allowed to run for public office? I know this is a strange question, but oddly it is something I would be interested in, if I ever make it through the whole process.

No, they cannot. The only thing they can't do.

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Does anyone know if naturalized Thai citizens are allowed to run for public office? I know this is a strange question, but oddly it is something I would be interested in, if I ever make it through the whole process.

No, they cannot. The only thing they can't do.

That's too bad, it would be nice to take a more active role in my tambon. But I guess the government thinks the right to drive a taxi for hire is enough participation in Thai society for naturalized citizens. What are they scared of? this is what I want to know.

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Hi does anyone know or have an example of "Affidavit from applicant’s embassy or consulate in Thailand that demonstrates the applicant’s intention to renounce his current nationality when his application for Thai nationality is approved." or is this a formatted document that the UK embassy would have already?


Thanks for the help.

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Hi does anyone know or have an example of "Affidavit from applicant’s embassy or consulate in Thailand that demonstrates the applicant’s intention to renounce his current nationality when his application for Thai nationality is approved." or is this a formatted document that the UK embassy would have already?

Thanks for the help.

The British Embassy has only blank forms for making declarations. You can make virtually any declaration in front of a vice consul as long as you can give a good reason and there is no reason to believe the declaration is false. Sometimes they will ask for documentary evidence but in this case it is only a declaration of intent and therefore no evidence is necessary or even possible.

The best thing would be to follow the Thai wording of the regulation as closely as possible, so that when it is translated to Thai it will gel with the regulation.

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I have been poking around even more and found the list of requirements, point system, documents, and forms required for citizenship on the Special Branch Website (warning it is in Thai):

http://www.sbpolice.go.th

On the left hand side there is a button that has a picture of a Pen writing the word Thai with a check mark. In the Thai script on the button it says Requesting Change to Thai Citizenship. If you click on this button a list of documents for all of the forms, requirements, and documents that Arkady and others were nice enough to translate for us are there. For those serious about doing this process, this may be a good opportunity to practice your Thai.

I apologize if this has been posted earlier or on other threads, mods feel free to delete. Please forgive my newbie-ness

Hi thanks for the info do you know where I can get the translated versions from?

Many thanks

Chris

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The wording in the guidelines is roughly translated like this:

Applicants should present a document they have submitted to their embassy or consulate in Thailand that demonstrates their intention to renounce their existing citizenship when they are approved for Thai citizenship.

So, you want to make a declaration that, when translated into Thai, is consistent with the original and can be translated into Thai using similar wording. Something on these lines should do the job.

Regarding my application for naturalization as a Thai citizen, I hereby swear that I intend to renounce my Ruritanian citizenship when I have been approved for Thai nationality by the competent Thai authorities.

Your embassy will advise you on any specific wording they require, including a preamble introducing yourself with passport number, i.e. I Joe F. Bloggs, holding Ruritanian passport number xxxxxxx issued at Ruritania on xx date.

Then you're done and just need to go to a translation agency and show them the original text of the regulation to give them the idea. You will need the translation notarised by the MoFA which the translator can arrange to save a lot of your time. Be sure you know how the vice consul's name is spelt in Thai for the translator to follow. The MoFA has specimen signatures and names in Thai spelling for all the foreign consular staff. If it is not exactly right, they will knock it back.

Edited by Arkady
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As an aside to this thread, we need to add 'Electronic Arrival and Departure Gates' to the list of advantages of being a naturalised Thai citizen listed by the OP.

The ones at Swampy work like a charm - scan your passport, walk into the sally port, look at a camera, put your finger on a scanner and presto, a door opens and you're though immigration. They don't even stamp your passport, and the whole process only takes seconds. Contrast that with a land crossing that I recently did in Nong Khai, where a buffoon of an immigration officer was asking me all sort of stupid questions about why I naturalised as a Thai and telling me that I had to sing the national anthem to prove that I was a 'real' one. I refused, telling him that I had already done this at the Interior Ministry and that the Interior Minister, and subsequently His Majesty, had approved my application. He passed me over to his boss, who rather sheepishly let me through without further comment.

There definitely are some unfriendly elements in immigration.

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As an aside to this thread, we need to add 'Electronic Arrival and Departure Gates' to the list of advantages of being a naturalised Thai citizen listed by the OP.

The ones at Swampy work like a charm - scan your passport, walk into the sally port, look at a camera, put your finger on a scanner and presto, a door opens and you're though immigration. They don't even stamp your passport, and the whole process only takes seconds. Contrast that with a land crossing that I recently did in Nong Khai, where a buffoon of an immigration officer was asking me all sort of stupid questions about why I naturalised as a Thai and telling me that I had to sing the national anthem to prove that I was a 'real' one. I refused, telling him that I had already done this at the Interior Ministry and that the Interior Minister, and subsequently His Majesty, had approved my application. He passed me over to his boss, who rather sheepishly let me through without further comment.

There definitely are some unfriendly elements in immigration.

Wierd one that - and you are right. None of their frigging business though I wonder if they have a problem with false passports up there. I've had the same bloke a few times at Nong Khai on the way back in. He always tells me he remembers me as I look like a foriegner (tdang dao) but with a thai PP. Always a pleasant enough chat and then I'm off.

As for the gates, they are fantastic. Except when they don't work - like last week when I was in and out of Thailand 3 times in 5 days. Had to join the line of the great unwashed on the way out. Fortunately, they took me to the front of the queue.... ;)

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Thankfully, I have not come across that element using my Thai passport. The only questions I've gotten were when applying for a Chinese visa.

Perhaps you should apply for an APEC card, then no more Chinese visa's.

Another advantage to Thai citizenship (unless you're already from an APEC country, of course).

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