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Mulling Buying A Used Volvo Xc 90 And Brand New Fortuner


Metalgear

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I think Thais aversion to second hand cars also comes into play here.

The argument goes - why buy second hand if you can buy new? Fortuner is ok, no need to buy a used car instead.

Those you want new cars can't buy Volvo, and those who are ok with second hand don't have enoughmoney, and if they had enough they'd go for a new car.

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I see that a Volvo or BMW SUV would be desirable, but in Thailand, I think it just don't make sense, they are just too expensive.

Agree fully........ now added is the Landrover Freelander. now they are no longer built here they have gone up 1.2 million, [over night as it were just on import tax etc] making them more expensive then the BMW X3 there nearest rival by 500k.

Thankfully it appears by the number of new red plated luxury European cars on the road so far this year, there will still be a supply of good cars at a sensible price in 4 or 5 years time, for those that want more than the every day car.

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I think Thais aversion to second hand cars also comes into play here.

The argument goes - why buy second hand if you can buy new? Fortuner is ok, no need to buy a used car instead.

Those you want new cars can't buy Volvo, and those who are ok with second hand don't have enoughmoney, and if they had enough they'd go for a new car.

I agree with your point about Thais aversion to 2nd hand cars. But as a foreigner I don't think like them, I think that even if I can afford to buy a new car, I wouldn't wanna spend so much of my money in this country because you never know what will happen. I don't feel secure enough to wanna spend money in a country where it is politically unstable. Although it is their country, Thais will also lose everything if the country becomes unstable.

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My sentiment is that a new car is always better than a second hand car, but the Volvo is a very good SUV and it is built differently from the Fortuner. Test them both.

My guess is that the Volvo will probably feel better and as you say it has lost most of the value already so it costs as much as a Fortuner... I had a Vigo a while back and it never let me down...

If you compare sweden against Japan, I would go asian every time. Simply because of their engines..

If the volvo is well kept it will run forever, just as the fortuner... Pick the one you like!

If you are a poser, go for the Volvo as the Thais will think that you are rich. Volvo =safty so if that is a concern for you, well....

Good luck.

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Volvo =safty so if that is a concern for you,

Like 10 airbags, All Anti-Jam windows & doors..... read on here about one member that could not get out of his Fortuner after a accident + the airbags did not activate

If you compare sweden against Japan, I would go asian every time. Simply because of their engines..

Volvo has not got a Swedish engine :o

Sure in the old days, no one would go anywhere without a tool kit in the back, and not expect to use it, + you would always take a blanket, drink and food with you, [spent many a night as a kid and when I could drive sleeping in the car waiting for daylight to do/fix the car to get home]

:D then came the Japanese cars and a very big wake up call because people bought them and they did not break down..

Now a day most cars are 100% reliable

If the volvo is well kept it will run forever

Many reports over the years of Volvo's still running on there original engines after 1 million miles

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Buy the Volvo. I have owned both and there is just no comparison. The Volvo is far far superior in every way you can think of.

Especially a good second hand one offers much more (emotional)value for money than the Fortuner truck!

Hahaha..................

Yeah right, and a BMW X5 is beter than both, if you have 6,700,00 Baht to spend on a car, get the BMW.

Fortuner is a truck ? Jeeez, that means its virtually indestructable, thanks for the recommendation.

BMW X5 = 6,700,000 Baht

Toyota Fortuner = I, 250,000 Baht.

Only a 6.3 Million Baht difference.

The BMW is a great car, of that there is no doubt, but is it financially prudent in Thailand to buy an X5 over a Fortuner ?

The Volvo, sure good car, but, I wouldn't dream of owning one in Thailand, what if it went wrong :D

If it had a 2JZ Toyota engine OK.

If Volvos are so great, how come they lose 2 Million baht so quickly ? :o

Stick with the Fortuner, Fortuners rule and they don't break down.

With the depreciation of a Volvo I could have bought another Fortuner for the Missus and a Honda Jazz for the little sister and still had a great motor just by having a Fortuner.

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If Volvos are so great, how come they lose 2 Million baht so quickly ?

Tax ALL tax/import duties .....

So it would be better to buy a BMW X5 ? Now a 4 year old X5 would have lost 3- 3.5 million :o So that would make the Volvo a better buy

Luxury Imported cars/SUV's new here are only for those that have the money to spend, most people would buy a 2md hand one, as from this point they loose value at the same rate as a Thai built car/SUV

It up to each person, there are those that would never buy anything other than new so there choice is the price they have in there budget.

Edited by ignis
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Buy the Volvo. I have owned both and there is just no comparison. The Volvo is far far superior in every way you can think of.

Especially a good second hand one offers much more (emotional)value for money than the Fortuner truck!

Hahaha..................

Yeah right, and a BMW X5 is beter than both, if you have 6,700,00 Baht to spend on a car, get the BMW.

Fortuner is a truck ? Jeeez, that means its virtually indestructable, thanks for the recommendation.

BMW X5 = 6,700,000 Baht

Toyota Fortuner = I, 250,000 Baht.

Only a 6.3 Million Baht difference.

The BMW is a great car, of that there is no doubt, but is it financially prudent in Thailand to buy an X5 over a Fortuner ?

The Volvo, sure good car, but, I wouldn't dream of owning one in Thailand, what if it went wrong :D

If it had a 2JZ Toyota engine OK.

If Volvos are so great, how come they lose 2 Million baht so quickly ? :o

Stick with the Fortuner, Fortuners rule and they don't break down.

With the depreciation of a Volvo I could have bought another Fortuner for the Missus and a Honda Jazz for the little sister and still had a great motor just by having a Fortuner.

Maigo,

To qualify my statement a bit more:

A 4 year old Volvo XC90 purchased at about 1.5 million in good condition is in my opinion much better value for money than any locally assembled japanese car incl. the truck called Fortuner.

I think the truck called Fortuner is good value for money, but for the money (1.5 million) the Volvo is MUCH better. Try one and you will know.

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Well as a product i like toyota, however you will always get the posters that slate them, a bit like the people that used to slate japanese bikes and would rather push/ride a british bike or similar,.however i have to say in thailand there isnt much choice and just to be different id go for the volvo,. :o

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much better value for money than any locally assembled japanese car

XC90 is also locally built and Japanese are not known for shoddy work, it's not 70s anymore.

1.65 mil is a good value for Volvo, but, as with any second hand car, there are hidden costs as well. If it's still in OP's budget then why not? Let him go for it.

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much better value for money than any locally assembled japanese car

XC90 is also locally built and Japanese are not known for shoddy work, it's not 70s anymore.

1.65 mil is a good value for Volvo, but, as with any second hand car, there are hidden costs as well. If it's still in OP's budget then why not? Let him go for it.

yes locally assembled but with far fewer locally produced parts than the japanese.

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A 4 year old Volvo XC90 purchased at about 1.5 million in good condition is in my opinion much better value for money than any locally assembled japanese car incl. the truck called Fortuner.

Where do you find a 4 year old XC90 for B 1.5M? My internet searches come up with prices still in the 3-4M range. I don't think anyone would argue that that both the SC90 and Fortuner are nice SUVs and "back home" where prices are not so distorted by various tax regimes, it might be an easy win for the SC90. But in Thailand, with the crazy price of Volvos (even though they are locally assembled) how can anyone justify paying 3-4x the cost of a CRV or Fortuner to own one?

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Hi,

The other day, I went to a Toyota Service center and had huge difficulties communicating with the staff in English. As soon as they realise I don't speak Thai, the service sucks ! And the time they took just to replace a fuse was half a day, the excuse was too many cars to service in the que.

This is also one of the reason why I am going for the Volvo. I now own a used 2005 Camry, the car is superb and very much worth the value. The one thing I like about it is that only the Camry of all the Toyotas in Thailand can at least match the XC90 in terms of quietness in the ride. So far I have had two cars of the previous model,a 2.4Q Toyota Camry and BMW 3 series.

Both cars are good quality but service for Toyotas sucks always. My guess is that the Volvo will also provide a better service quality. First impression from the Volvo staffs are good, they give you a lot of attention and their English is spoken well. At Toyota, the staffs try to ignore me when I was asking about the new fortuner...the guy that could speak english was too busy sitting at the table waiting for a customer and was telling another staff in Thai how to deal with me. You see, I can actually speak Thai very well but I just wanted to ask in english to see what kinda reaction and attention the customer service or sales staffs would give me. So I understood what he said. Just plain lazy bugger.

Case close.

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I have to disagree with post #48 citing poor Toyota service. We live in Chiang Mai and have experienced the exact opposite...terrific service. Yes, I speak a little Thai but my wife handles the transaction anyway with the service representative. Like everything else done between farang and Thai in this kingdom, the manner in which a farang discusses any matter with a Thai is not to be taken lightly. Some of us, even unwittingly and in a friendly manner, tend to talk down to a Thai and act like pompous foreigners (I call it the 'big brother' syndrome)...leading to poor outcomes. But this is a subject for a different forum topic.

We have the same dilemma this year...and have narrowed it down to a new diesel Fortuner or a new petrol CRV. We gave up the idea long ago of buying any Euro-car due to the cost differential. Scratch any Thai driving a European vehicle and you will find someone striving to flaunt his or her wealth and gain respect on the highway; it is never about driving a well-engineered vehicle that might save his family's lives or provide better features.

Another factor that plays heavily in our own buying decision is the prevalence of repair shops around the country...take that XC-90 to the outback of Thailand and guess how many Volvo-trained and equipped service centers you'll find! They are few and very far between. But a Fortuner or Honda can get fixed anywhere and for a whole lot less money.

Finally, there is the ease factor--how far do you live from a Volvo versus Toyota (etc) dealer? In a big metro area like Bangkok this could amount to a major expeditiion to get the car serviced. Even in Chiang Mai, the Volvo dealer is an additional 10-km drive for us from the nearest Toyota and Honda dealers. When they service the vehicle, how long is the typical wait? Will they drive you in a courtesy car back to your home and return to pick you up when the job is completed? I don't know about the local Volvo dealer, but our loyal Toyota man is glad to do this for us. It gives us a good reason to buy another Toyota, although I am attracted to the tauter and nimbler CRV.

Above all, unless you are filthy rich, I totally agree with another earlier poster who recommended that the OP limit his financial exposure in Thailand. Oh...and don't dare get in a wreck with that XC-90...the injured party will attempt to sue you for all they can, assuming that you have endlessly deep pockets. My wife totaled our original Camry in 2004 when it was a brand new car. Our first class insurance paid for 80 percent of the purchase price of an identical 2004 model, causing us to instantly lose 20% of the trashed car's worth. That amounted to a THB 30,000 loss after it was all said and done. We could have waited 6 months to get the damaged car fixed and saved that THB 30K, but it would have been eaten up in rental charges. Think hard about potential insurance consequences for any vehicle you settle upon. Had we bought an expensive European car, that 20% loss would have added up to some pretty big numbers.

Personally, I admire the XC-90 and if I had retired in the USA I would have probably bought one...where they are reasonably priced. But we are in Thailand and that makes a huge difference.

Edited by Fore Man
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We have the same dilemma this year...and have narrowed it down to a new diesel Fortuner or a new petrol CRV. We gave up the idea long ago of buying any Euro-car due to the cost differential. Scratch any Thai driving a European vehicle and you will find someone striving to flaunt his or her wealth and gain respect on the highway; it is never about driving a well-engineered vehicle that might save his family's lives or provide better features...

You just about said it all in your post...well done :o

I too would certainly consider the Volvo SUV in in the USA because it is a fine vehicle, would be easy to service, and is maybe 25% more expensive than a Toyota equivalent. I would not pay a 300% premium to a Toyota to buy it in Thailand.

Even the 4-5 year old used models some have linked to above are 1.4-1.5M baht or 15-20% more than a BRAND NEW Fortuner or CRV.

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We have the same dilemma this year...and have narrowed it down to a new diesel Fortuner or a new petrol CRV. We gave up the idea long ago of buying any Euro-car due to the cost differential. Scratch any Thai driving a European vehicle and you will find someone striving to flaunt his or her wealth and gain respect on the highway; it is never about driving a well-engineered vehicle that might save his family's lives or provide better features...

You just about said it all in your post...well done :o

I too would certainly consider the Volvo SUV in in the USA because it is a fine vehicle, would be easy to service, and is maybe 25% more expensive than a Toyota equivalent. I would not pay a 300% premium to a Toyota to buy it in Thailand.

Even the 4-5 year old used models some have linked to above are 1.4-1.5M baht or 15-20% more than a BRAND NEW Fortuner or CRV.

Yes, agreed. And at that price exceeding a brand new Toyota or Honda, you would still be taking over someone else's problems. A used car is like a time bomb...ticking away and when you least expect it... The only positive thing I can offer is that hopefully a previous owner of an XC-90 would obviously come from a higher economic stratum and might have attended to all service requirements, but that's not a gimme.

Edited by Fore Man
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Just came across this question and I hope my opinion is not too late.

I was faced with the same question about 1 1/2 years ago. First I went to (several) Toyota dealers and was treated like sh**t. I will never again try to buy a Toyota from a dealer in Bangkok, my experience with 3 different dealers is so bad that I do not wish to risk that again.

Finally I ended up at the Volvo dealer and bought an XC90 with the 6-cylinder engine and the navi and entertainment system.

Here is my experience with the car:

- it is a very safe and well built car. Comparing it to a Fortuner is like comparing Yugo (remember?) to a Mercedes-Benz. If you have a family, and if you have a sense of responsibility, by all means take the Volvo, especially if the price is acceptable for you. n case of an accident, in the Volvo you have a chance to survive, in the Fortuner not.

- The navigation system is absolutely useless, save your many on that and by a portable system. It can only be accessed through a remote (Who of you kids has the remote!) and its logic drives me nuts.

- same for the entertainment system. Its not useless, but way too expensive. Better buy a portable DVD player for the kids.

- it has a built-in telephone, just insert your SIM card and you are read to go. Has speakers and microphone for handfree use as well as a head set (for "private" talks).

- it has a lot of room. It even has 2 additional full size seats, totalying 7 seats and still enough space for luggage. In the 5-seats configuration you can sleep in the trunk.

- the mileage it get is about 13 l / 100km; I don't know what this makes in mpg or football fields or olympic swimming pools (I am a metric guy)

- so far the car has had no flaws at all, no need for any repair and all service and maintenance was free. I once had a flat tire and called Volvo. 30 Min later someone came to change the tire, repair it (actually I needed a new one) and brought the whole wheel back.

- So far I have 25,000 km on the counter and I inted to keep it, unless AUDI imports the new Q5.

BTW, do you wanna buy mine? :o

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Only problem with the Fortuner is not to forget where you park at Lotus or you will never find it amongst the hundreds of others. It is probably a good, reliable workhorse, if A to B is your only priority, but it will never be an attention getter. Some people though want more out of a vehicle and get satisfaction from it, as such often want something a little different.

Low millage second hand cars should prove reliable if they have been looked after, and I would agree an upmarket vehicle probably has been to keep the warranty valid.

Everyone has different needs, choose what you like. True, there is nothing like new. The numbers quoted on new European vehicles are exhorbitant, but the right second hand one can be both affordable and a great unique vehicle. I personally stil may go either way yet.

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I also like the XC90 and came close to buying a secondhand one late last year, I was looking at 1.7m but opted for the top of the range Capitiva (1.56m) instead as I was concerned about servicing and parts cost and wanted at least some warranty on a Volvo (they come with 3 years new), in fact I did find one which met my criteria but sadly couldnt move quickly enough to snag it.

I have been very happy with my Chevy, its economical (diesel), comfortable, drives fine (I had 900 turbo before), tons of options and features (trip computers, AUX in etc). I will be keeping this for a while.

If you can get an XC90 say, a 2005/ 2006 model for the right money, do it. If the maintenance costs of an older model don't bother you, do it. Tire wear is the big cause for concern for XC90, as they can be quite pricey to replace.

Or check out the Captiva. Sure check out CRV and Fortunas too, if you must, but personally I hated the ride quality of the Fortuna.

I hear good things about the CRV (which is also cheaper than a new Captiva) but it was the option for 7 seats that attracted to the XC90 / Captiva. This has proved very useful with a Thai family in tow, and when not needed there's tons of storage. The XC90's extra 2 seats have a little more leg room than the Chevy, but still they are only really good for kids, so its not much of an issue.

Also disregard myths of no depreciation for Japanese cars etc, because that only holds true for the first year, after warranties expire their values drop to the same percentage as any other make, i.e. 3 year old CRV's and Fortunas lose 50%.

Edited by quiksilva
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Also disregard myths of no depreciation for Japanese cars etc, because that only holds true for the first year, after warranties expire their values drop to the same percentage as any other make, i.e. 3 year old CRV's and Fortunas lose 50%.

What about Captiva after 3 years?

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Also disregard myths of no depreciation for Japanese cars etc, because that only holds true for the first year, after warranties expire their values drop to the same percentage as any other make, i.e. 3 year old CRV's and Fortunas lose 50%.

3 year old Diesel Fortuner for 625,000 baht, where do you find these ?

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Also disregard myths of no depreciation for Japanese cars etc, because that only holds true for the first year, after warranties expire their values drop to the same percentage as any other make, i.e. 3 year old CRV's and Fortunas lose 50%.

3 year old Diesel Fortuner for 625,000 baht, where do you find these ?

2006 = 660k

http://www.siammotor.com/siammotornew/deta...?transnum=12634

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