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Thai Words Used In English


asiancup2007

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Does anyone know of any Thai words that are in general use in the English Language???

"mai thai"

'English' adopts new words every year. 45% of the vocabulary are directly French words.

canoe, moccasin and many more were aboriginal words. we used to say 'tidal wave' but have adopted 'tsunami'

People have been drinking 'Mai Thais' for decades. In our household, miaOW is used a LOT, and Alena oyieeEE is used as a greeting. only when I say it, it, apparently, means 'get me a fork' < :o

If you Google new words, you can find the list of new words that get added every year and see if they let you search by nation

It would be very, very difficult to add Thai words. Some are impossible to spell in English.

mayow miaough ??? also, even if you get the spelling right, the 'word' can have 5 different meanings. English 'inflections' would have to be invented.

mai mai mai mai mai, if said right, means will you get me some firewood dear? [or something like that]

I cannot call a Thai friend by his nickname Jiow jiau jeyow. I have to use his given name.

It is supposed to mean 'eagle'. In the same way some Thais cannot say rrr, I cannot say jiaow so it comes out right. it comes out as 'dirt' or something.

http://www.google.ca/search?hl=en&q=ne...Search&meta=

For example, farang will probably get in the dictionary someday, or would that be falang?

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Does anyone know of any Thai words that are in general use in the English Language???

"mai thai"

'English' adopts new words every year. 45% of the vocabulary are directly French words.

canoe, moccasin and many more were aboriginal words. we used to say 'tidal wave' but have adopted 'tsunami'

People have been drinking 'Mai Thais' for decades. In our household, miaOW is used a LOT, and Alena oyieeEE is used as a greeting. only when I say it, it, apparently, means 'get me a fork' < :o

If you Google new words, you can find the list of new words that get added every year and see if they let you search by nation

It would be very, very difficult to add Thai words. Some are impossible to spell in English.

mayow miaough ??? also, even if you get the spelling right, the 'word' can have 5 different meanings. English 'inflections' would have to be invented.

mai mai mai mai mai, if said right, means will you get me some firewood dear? [or something like that]

I cannot call a Thai friend by his nickname Jiow jiau jeyow. I have to use his given name.

It is supposed to mean 'eagle'. In the same way some Thais cannot say rrr, I cannot say jiaow so it comes out right. it comes out as 'dirt' or something.

http://www.google.ca/search?hl=en&q=ne...Search&meta=

For example, farang will probably get in the dictionary someday, or would that be falang?

How about Ting Tong? That is quite popular now, thanks to the TV program Little Britain, although I doubt anyone that has been or knows anyone who has been to Thailand understands what it means.

As for French words, I would say SURRENDER is probably the best well known, as we have heard the French say it on many, many occasions. :D

John.....

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Does anyone know of any Thai words that are in general use in the English Language???

I cannot call a Thai friend by his nickname Jiow jiau jeyow. I have to use his given name.

It is supposed to mean 'eagle'. In the same way some Thais cannot say rrr, I cannot say jiaow so it comes out right. it comes out as 'dirt' or something.

http://www.google.ca/search?hl=en&q=ne...Search&meta=

For example, farang will probably get in the dictionary someday, or would that be falang?

How about Ting Tong? . :D

John.....

aha. My wife pronounces it Ding Dong! :D

aha I found one! :o

bong dictionary.gif "water pipe for marijuana," 1960s, U.S. slang, said to have been introduced by Vietnam veterans, from Thai baung, lit. "cylindrical wooden tube." nowadays called the "phelps" tube.

Come to think of it, Thai stick and Thai bud was part of my daily vocabulary many years ago!

Edited by eggomaniac
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Does anyone know of any Thai words that are in general use in the English Language???

I cannot call a Thai friend by his nickname Jiow jiau jeyow. I have to use his given name.

It is supposed to mean 'eagle'. In the same way some Thais cannot say rrr, I cannot say jiaow so it comes out right. it comes out as 'dirt' or something.

http://www.google.ca/search?hl=en&q=ne...Search&meta=

For example, farang will probably get in the dictionary someday, or would that be falang?

How about Ting Tong? . :D

John.....

aha. My wife pronounces it Ding Dong! :D

aha I found one! :D

bong dictionary.gif "water pipe for marijuana," 1960s, U.S. slang, said to have been introduced by Vietnam veterans, from Thai baung, lit. "cylindrical wooden tube." nowadays called the "phelps" tube.

Come to think of it, Thai stick and Thai bud was part of my daily vocabulary many years ago!

Oh, the hazy, lazy good old days. :o

As qualtrough says, how about Siamese cat?

John.....

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Lots of interesting ideas put forward but when I think of what constitutes a word in one language being used in "everyday use" in another language i think of words like "rendezvous" from French. Thai has lots of proper nouns used internationally (Siam, Muay Thai, items on a thai food menu etc...) , but I cant really think of any common nouns or verbs...that bong example was a good one though.

The best I have, and this is just trivia, not a word in use in the English language, is the great race horse Phar Lap ( ฟ้าแลบ ) , it is thai for lightning. I'm sure you could use that word in some cockney rhyming slang somehow :o

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Lots of interesting ideas put forward but when I think of what constitutes a word in one language being used in "everyday use" in another language i think of words like "rendezvous" from French. Thai has lots of proper nouns used internationally (Siam, Muay Thai, items on a thai food menu etc...) , but I cant really think of any common nouns or verbs...that bong example was a good one though.

The best I have, and this is just trivia, not a word in use in the English language, is the great race horse Phar Lap ( ฟ้าแลบ ) , it is thai for lightning. I'm sure you could use that word in some cockney rhyming slang somehow :o

Kaputt...germany :D

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Does anyone know of any Thai words that are in general use in the English Language???

I cannot call a Thai friend by his nickname Jiow jiau jeyow. I have to use his given name.

It is supposed to mean 'eagle'. In the same way some Thais cannot say rrr, I cannot say jiaow so it comes out right. it comes out as 'dirt' or something.

http://www.google.ca/search?hl=en&q=ne...Search&meta=

For example, farang will probably get in the dictionary someday, or would that be falang?

How about Ting Tong? . :wai:

John.....

aha. My wife pronounces it Ding Dong! :D

aha I found one! :D

bong dictionary.gif "water pipe for marijuana," 1960s, U.S. slang, said to have been introduced by Vietnam veterans, from Thai baung, lit. "cylindrical wooden tube." nowadays called the "phelps" tube.

Come to think of it, Thai stick and Thai bud was part of my daily vocabulary many years ago!

Oh, the hazy, lazy good old days. :o

As qualtrough says, how about Siamese cat?

John.....

nowadays called the "phelps" tube.

I LOVE IT

:D

:D

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siksak ... I'm not sure it's a thai word, but that's what my wife says when she sees a drunk on the street (besides the word Maao)

Now, my english is what i've learned from TV, so spare me on this one okay.

zigzag is the way most of the drunks walk right ? So maybe it's an english word used by Thai ...

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