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Customer Satisfaction?


maerim

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A few weeks ago for my stepdaughter’s birthday I bought her a 4 wheel drive sports futility vehicle, not new but in excellent condition.

I had it serviced, it already had a roof rack and side steps and the next time they are used will be the first,so I had all the essential extras added, you know fluffy toys, MP3 player, cushions etc. she was very happy with it for about two days when it started revving at about 3000 rpm. I couldn’t see any obvious cause so my wife called a mechanic he arrived next day whilst I was out he fixed it I asked what was wrong but he did not say just charged 200 baht and it seemed OK.

It was, for two days then it started again, ticking over at 3000 rpm. So off to the main dealer get this sorted once and for all, they said no problem come back at 5PM I asked them to change the timing belt as I was under the impression they knew what they were about, OK that will be 6000 baht, cheaper than a new engine so get on with it.

We returned at 5 PM the engine was ticking over OK and they hade changed the timing belt, two pulleys and an aluminium piece of kit with two spigots where hoses are attached and a electrical socket on the end this apparently was the cause of the over revving and that will cost you 16,000 baht thank you very much, yes sixteen thousand.

Paid the bill and off we went again OK for about 2 or 3 days and over revving again exactly the same as it was before so back to the main dealer, this is a 60 km round trip by the way, plus the inconvenience so they had it all day, 5 PM it seemed OK we collected it and get this, they said no charge well isn’t that good of them?

A few days later same, same, to say I was fed up would be a bit of an understatement so back to the dealer as they did not phone us we phoned them at 5-30 PM no reply, next day bright and early we went to pick it up this time they said they knew what it was, a faulty electrical plug that fitted onto the socket on the bit that I had bought the previous week and that will be 185 baht please.

I pointed out to them that the part they changed did not need changing as the problem was with the electrical plug and why did they not spot the problem the previous two times they had it?

By this time everyone had forgotten how to speak English, where’s the gaffer? Bangkok, is he now? Where’s the second in command? Not here, now I was very, very fed up with this so my missus said just pay the bill and we can go as I always do as I’m told we did.

As it happens the problem up till now seems to have been solved by this 185 baht plug.

I have e-mailed the boss of the dealership for his side of the story but as of today no reply and it looks as if I will not get one.

The customer is always wrong!

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A few weeks ago for my stepdaughter’s birthday I bought her a 4 wheel drive sports futility vehicle, not new but in excellent condition.

I had it serviced, it already had a roof rack and side steps and the next time they are used will be the first,so I had all the essential extras added, you know fluffy toys, MP3 player, cushions etc. she was very happy with it for about two days when it started revving at about 3000 rpm. I couldn’t see any obvious cause so my wife called a mechanic he arrived next day whilst I was out he fixed it I asked what was wrong but he did not say just charged 200 baht and it seemed OK.

It was, for two days then it started again, ticking over at 3000 rpm. So off to the main dealer get this sorted once and for all, they said no problem come back at 5PM I asked them to change the timing belt as I was under the impression they knew what they were about, OK that will be 6000 baht, cheaper than a new engine so get on with it.

We returned at 5 PM the engine was ticking over OK and they hade changed the timing belt, two pulleys and an aluminium piece of kit with two spigots where hoses are attached and a electrical socket on the end this apparently was the cause of the over revving and that will cost you 16,000 baht thank you very much, yes sixteen thousand.

Paid the bill and off we went again OK for about 2 or 3 days and over revving again exactly the same as it was before so back to the main dealer, this is a 60 km round trip by the way, plus the inconvenience so they had it all day, 5 PM it seemed OK we collected it and get this, they said no charge well isn’t that good of them?

A few days later same, same, to say I was fed up would be a bit of an understatement so back to the dealer as they did not phone us we phoned them at 5-30 PM no reply, next day bright and early we went to pick it up this time they said they knew what it was, a faulty electrical plug that fitted onto the socket on the bit that I had bought the previous week and that will be 185 baht please.

I pointed out to them that the part they changed did not need changing as the problem was with the electrical plug and why did they not spot the problem the previous two times they had it?

By this time everyone had forgotten how to speak English, where’s the gaffer? Bangkok, is he now? Where’s the second in command? Not here, now I was very, very fed up with this so my missus said just pay the bill and we can go as I always do as I’m told we did.

As it happens the problem up till now seems to have been solved by this 185 baht plug.

I have e-mailed the boss of the dealership for his side of the story but as of today no reply and it looks as if I will not get one.

The customer is always wrong!

You should have known that Maerim :o T i T

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Consumer protection will come someday :o I hope

I doubt it.

I've always thought the fundamental difference between the position of the consumer here and in the west is rooted in the concept of relative status, which is after all the fundamental driver of the whole social structure in Thailand. In the west, the consumer has the greater status. After all, he is the buyer, the man with the dough, and he calls the shots. 'The customer is always right,' remember?

In Thailand just the opposite view prevails. The vendor has the staus here. He has something you, the consumer, want and therefore you must pursuade him to give it to you. Sometimes with money, but more ofter by demonstrating your own status relative to his. The vendor treats his sale to the consumer as a blessing granted by him. Otherwise he would be surrendering the high ground of his own status and deferring to yours.

Consumer protection? Forget about it. The whole feudal social structure of Thailand weighs against it.

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Good things come to those that wait.

I don't know exactly when and how wide ranging, but Honda is about to implement a Technical Assistance facility and CRM throughout the Sout East Asia area.

The introduction of these systems will help eliminate situations the OP just experienced. As well as eliminating situations where women smash their cars up with hammers.

Not to blow my own trumpet (I am actually) the CRM system is based on the CRM system I wrote and currently maintain in Australia. Hopefully, when implemented, customer satisfaction will improve, or at least there will be somewhere for the customer to contact if no satisfaction is gained from the dealership.

I'm interested to know if and what contact the dealership or manufacturer has with a customer after purchasing vehicles, new or second hand in Thailand.

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A few weeks ago for my stepdaughter’s birthday I bought her a 4 wheel drive sports futility vehicle, not new but in excellent condition.

I had it serviced, it already had a roof rack and side steps and the next time they are used will be the first,so I had all the essential extras added, you know fluffy toys, MP3 player, cushions etc. she was very happy with it for about two days when it started revving at about 3000 rpm. I couldn’t see any obvious cause so my wife called a mechanic he arrived next day whilst I was out he fixed it I asked what was wrong but he did not say just charged 200 baht and it seemed OK.

It was, for two days then it started again, ticking over at 3000 rpm. So off to the main dealer get this sorted once and for all, they said no problem come back at 5PM I asked them to change the timing belt as I was under the impression they knew what they were about, OK that will be 6000 baht, cheaper than a new engine so get on with it.

We returned at 5 PM the engine was ticking over OK and they hade changed the timing belt, two pulleys and an aluminium piece of kit with two spigots where hoses are attached and a electrical socket on the end this apparently was the cause of the over revving and that will cost you 16,000 baht thank you very much, yes sixteen thousand.

Paid the bill and off we went again OK for about 2 or 3 days and over revving again exactly the same as it was before so back to the main dealer, this is a 60 km round trip by the way, plus the inconvenience so they had it all day, 5 PM it seemed OK we collected it and get this, they said no charge well isn’t that good of them?

A few days later same, same, to say I was fed up would be a bit of an understatement so back to the dealer as they did not phone us we phoned them at 5-30 PM no reply, next day bright and early we went to pick it up this time they said they knew what it was, a faulty electrical plug that fitted onto the socket on the bit that I had bought the previous week and that will be 185 baht please.

I pointed out to them that the part they changed did not need changing as the problem was with the electrical plug and why did they not spot the problem the previous two times they had it?

By this time everyone had forgotten how to speak English, where’s the gaffer? Bangkok, is he now? Where’s the second in command? Not here, now I was very, very fed up with this so my missus said just pay the bill and we can go as I always do as I’m told we did.

As it happens the problem up till now seems to have been solved by this 185 baht plug.

I have e-mailed the boss of the dealership for his side of the story but as of today no reply and it looks as if I will not get one.

The customer is always wrong!

>>>>> A few weeks ago I bought a 4 wheel drive sports futility vehicle, not new but in excellent condition. <<<<<<<<<<<

:o:D:D

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I pointed out to them that the part they changed did not need changing as the problem was with the electrical plug and why did they not spot the problem the previous two times they had it?

By this time everyone had forgotten how to speak English, where’s the gaffer? Bangkok, is he now? Where’s the second in command? Not here, now I was very, very fed up with this so my missus said just pay the bill and we can go as I always do as I’m told we did.

As it happens the problem up till now seems to have been solved by this 185 baht plug.

I have e-mailed the boss of the dealership for his side of the story but as of today no reply and it looks as if I will not get one.

The customer is always wrong!

From the shit they gave you, it seems obvious they knew the customer was right, and it got you the all-too-typical response.

Accountabilty is still a rare occurance here, it seems. It sounds like you handled it the best way under the circumstances, but I can imagine myself wanting to 'go postal' on them at some point. No New Years apple pie for these folks!

Maerim, can you name names here? I, for one, would appreciate any 'cautions' for any particular business where I might go...

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Consumer protection will come someday :D I hope

I doubt it.

I've always thought the fundamental difference between the position of the consumer here and in the west is rooted in the concept of relative status, which is after all the fundamental driver of the whole social structure in Thailand. In the west, the consumer has the greater status. After all, he is the buyer, the man with the dough, and he calls the shots. 'The customer is always right,' remember?

In Thailand just the opposite view prevails. The vendor has the staus here. He has something you, the consumer, want and therefore you must pursuade him to give it to you. Sometimes with money, but more ofter by demonstrating your own status relative to his. The vendor treats his sale to the consumer as a blessing granted by him. Otherwise he would be surrendering the high ground of his own status and deferring to yours.

Consumer protection? Forget about it. The whole feudal social structure of Thailand weighs against it.

What I would say is that in some Western countries there are trading Standards Departments who are able to use effective laws which keep the Vendors on their toes because they do not want to be prosecuted.

Wherever you buy in the world as a customer in my experience you are treated with respect. When you have paid your money it can be a different story.

I`ll give you an example.

I have just had some solid silver candlesticks made in Cyprus and shipped to the UK. I paid for them at the point of sale and purchased them from a supposedly reputable silvermith/jeweller.

I requested and was assured that they were to be sent by fully insured airmail and I assumed that the overall price quoted included this cost.

Low and behold when the candlesticks arrived they were quite badly damaged, although the box that they were in appeared undamaged.

I emailed the vendor to inform him of the damage and enquired about the insurance.

The reply I got was "Dear...... How are you? Thank you for your email.

I have contacted the Post Office and they say that the insurance is not valid because you have opened the box.

Give my regards to your wife.

Best wishes....

Figure the logic in that one... :o

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...happy with it for about two days when it started revving at about 3000 rpm....

I had the same problem with a Renault 19 16V hot hatch many years ago. The engine revs are kept up by the engine management system while your wheels are moving, but when you stop, a signal is supposed to go to the management system to tell it to decrease the revs.

The wire carrying that signal from the speedo was loose on my brand new car so it over-revved. It took the Renault main dealer 2 or 3 visits before they fixed it - just a cheap connector was all that was needed.

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recommend the following dealerships:

Honda Bangchan (on Sukapibal 2 Rd. in Bangkok) for my Accord. The reverse gear started knocking when going into gear, causing the car to jump half a foot or so, more than a year after I bought it (in 2001). No longer under warranty, overhauled/fixed free of charge. Not a single problem to this day as a 4 1/2 year old car, 120,000 kilometer car. Still excellent service at the dealership, even though I know I won't be getting another car there anytime soon. Would recommend for anyone wanting a Honda.

S.E.C Group on Rama IX for my Toyota Granvia. 6 years old, still runs like new, the dealership no longer imports Granvia (now importing the Toyota Alphard instead). Even so, never had a problem with parts or servicing. First class service all the way 6 years running. Would recommend for anyone who wants a new minivan, Harrier, S500, MR-S, etc.

:o

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Over the years i have found that if you try and establish some kind of relationship with those you meet and do business with,then you will receive a decent level of service and care.Getting things done here depends very much on what the other person thinks of you.

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Over the years i have found that if you try and establish some kind of relationship with those you meet and do business with,then you will receive a decent level of service and care.Getting things done here depends very much on what the other person thinks of you.

that does seem to be the key here.

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The other day I used the skytrain and got the required change from the window girl.....I got 50 baht as I needed forty ....anyway I put forty baht in and expect 5 baht change.......when I put the last coin in the machine closes down......fortunately I actually got the card but no change !! No problem.....not bothered by 5 baht change......so I get on the skytrain and go to destination.......then when trying to check out through the turnstiles.......beeeeep sorry no go sunshine.....the guards waves me over to the window and the guy checks my card......

He informs mne that I owe 5 baht.........welllll faaaark me........I sapt the dummy ...against all my best awareness of jai yennism........and told them I was going through the gate or over it as I waas actually owed 5 baht not me oweing them.

they opened the gate.......yeah another silly farang jai rorn .....sorry about that.

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A few weeks ago for my stepdaughter’s birthday I bought her a 4 wheel drive sports futility vehicle, not new but in excellent condition.

I had it serviced, it already had a roof rack and side steps and the next time they are used will be the first,so I had all the essential extras added, you know fluffy toys, MP3 player, cushions etc. she was very happy with it for about two days when it started revving at about 3000 rpm. I couldn’t see any obvious cause so my wife called a mechanic he arrived next day whilst I was out he fixed it I asked what was wrong but he did not say just charged 200 baht and it seemed OK.

It was, for two days then it started again, ticking over at 3000 rpm. So off to the main dealer get this sorted once and for all, they said no problem come back at 5PM I asked them to change the timing belt as I was under the impression they knew what they were about, OK that will be 6000 baht, cheaper than a new engine so get on with it.

We returned at 5 PM the engine was ticking over OK and they hade changed the timing belt, two pulleys and an aluminium piece of kit with two spigots where hoses are attached and a electrical socket on the end this apparently was the cause of the over revving and that will cost you 16,000 baht thank you very much, yes sixteen thousand.

Paid the bill and off we went again OK for about 2 or 3 days and over revving again exactly the same as it was before so back to the main dealer, this is a 60 km round trip by the way, plus the inconvenience so they had it all day, 5 PM it seemed OK we collected it and get this, they said no charge well isn’t that good of them?

A few days later same, same, to say I was fed up would be a bit of an understatement so back to the dealer as they did not phone us we phoned them at 5-30 PM no reply, next day bright and early we went to pick it up this time they said they knew what it was, a faulty electrical plug that fitted onto the socket on the bit that I had bought the previous week and that will be 185 baht please.

I pointed out to them that the part they changed did not need changing as the problem was with the electrical plug and why did they not spot the problem the previous two times they had it?

By this time everyone had forgotten how to speak English, where’s the gaffer? Bangkok, is he now? Where’s the second in command? Not here, now I was very, very fed up with this so my missus said just pay the bill and we can go as I always do as I’m told we did.

As it happens the problem up till now seems to have been solved by this 185 baht plug.

I have e-mailed the boss of the dealership for his side of the story but as of today no reply and it looks as if I will not get one.

The customer is always wrong!

That seem's very "FARANGSIVE" to me .

Being an ex engineer my self ,they sound the same as most of the UK main dealer's,"go in for a small dfect and come away with a brand new suspension and breaking system,and most of the time you come away with more fault's than you had in the first place . :o

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It's not just in Thailand that this happens...car dealerships in the US can be pretty nasty too. Even "certified" used car purchasers are often told to take a hike if problems arise. Whatever a dealership promises, NOT ONE WORD is valid unless it's in writing on an official form. Many sales reps and dealership managers will promise the world but deliver nothing if they can get away with it. As for maintenance, a lot of these clowns will practically rebuild your engine instead of just fixing the AC unless you specify what work is to be done and make sure it's WRITTEN down on some kind of work order form (which you should get a copy of).

In the US where labor costs a bundle, it always helps to know some things about cars as even simple stuff like new brake pads can be expensive. Many mechanics in the US will rob you blind if you're not careful. Here in Thailand, labor is cheap making it possible to keep an old junker running for a long time but the greed factor is still there. The language barrier will only make this factor more complicated. As another poster said, if you establish a relationship with a service person you trust, you can have quality work done without being ripped off.

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In regards to Hondas, they seem to have a poor track record here in Thailand. I can't figure it out since Hondas are very reliable in the States. There are so many mechanical problems with these vehicles and the prices are similar to the Toyota equivalents. Toyotas do well the world over so if I were buying a car, van or SUV I would go for a Toyota. The Toyotas are similar in comfort and handling as well.

Edited by Thaiboxer
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perhaps just some nice CD's this time next year?

The way things are going she will be lucky to get a set of roller blades next year and the way things are going they will have oval wheels.

Guess what? Yup it's over revving again I took my Mitsubishi in today for a service the missus turned up to pick me up and there is a slight improvement it's only ticking over ar 2,500 rpm now as it was revving at 3,000 before.

So off to the main dealers, no names, no pack drill but the name Yontrakit

( Chiang Mai ) Super highway near the Big c supermarket springs to mind, no problem they said, yeah right leave it with us, I said and shall we get a taxi home?

So the mechanic comes out took it in to the workshop plugs one end of the computer into the motor and the other end into the computer in the garage and the screen says "Yes! this is going to cost you a packet!" So I did my film producer bit and put the guy in the suit in the picture.

"look mush, you are spending more time with this car than we are, you can have it tomorrow as we are busy today." all with a "jai yen yen" by the way and a smile.

So they are going to have another stab at it tomorrow.

To be continued.

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Over the years i have found that if you try and establish some kind of relationship with those you meet and do business with,then you will receive a decent level of service and care.Getting things done here depends very much on what the other person thinks of you.

True indeed, how many times have you ever just been ignored by the staff only for some hiso Thai to strutt in and get gold plated service??

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