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Thai Sayings and Phrases Wanted


RamdomChances
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I usually order soup daily on the street. I try to order mine with just chicken, pork, or beef meat - no balls of any kind wanted. Is there an easy way to say "no balls" meaning any kind of ball that street vendors will easily understand?

 
I would think that ไม่​ใส่​ลูกชิ้น​ should do it.
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  • 2 months later...

อัฐยายซื้อขนมยาย 

Granny’s money buys granny’s kanom. 

 

A common thing in families I should think.

A. Pays. “Here is the money for the taxi.” 

B. Hands it back. Thanks,  Oh! I forgot, you paid the phone bill so here is the money for that. 

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  • 1 month later...

Hi, hope this is in the right place....I have a question about a thai saying that translates to english, on FB anyway, as "I want to eat all the food in the world".  Have had this in two separate post from two contacts on FB in last month.  They are ladies with heavy Issan influence so use Lao a lot.  Does it really have anything to do with eating?  I believe that there exists many phases, etc. that the Thai folks don't want farangs to understand so they can converse in confidence and others exist that would have meaning only to persons who are steeped in the culture.

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5 minutes ago, IraqRon said:

Hi, hope this is in the right place....I have a question about a thai saying that translates to english, on FB anyway, as "I want to eat all the food in the world".  Have had this in two separate post from two contacts on FB in last month.  They are ladies with heavy Issan influence so use Lao a lot.  Does it really have anything to do with eating?  I believe that there exists many phases, etc. that the Thai folks don't want farangs to understand so they can converse in confidence and others exist that would have meaning only to persons who are steeped in the culture.

Post the original Thai/Issan and go from there.

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1 hour ago, Damrongsak said:

Post the original Thai/Issan and go from there.

อยากกินอาหารทุกอย่างบนโลกใบนี้    here is one similar, uses word planet not world.  could not find the other post by the older lady.  Maybe she is just hungry.

 

thanks anyway Mr. Damrongsak

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  • 2 weeks later...
20 minutes ago, alejju said:

Hi everyone, I'm new here. I would like to translate this sentence in thai language: "As long as you love, you will still have hope"

 

Can someone can help me please?

 

Best Regards.

Per wifey, "Thrab die te khun yung rak, khun yung me wang.

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  • 1 month later...

Hi all! I have zero knowledge of Thai but I interviewed a Thai person for a uni module I'm taking. She told me about a Thai proverb that means something like "You don't know her, but you want to get to know her". She wrote it down (with latin script) for me like this: chan key rong jak taé chai mai 

 

Can anyone confirm whether this is the right proverb and if this is the right translation? I would be very interested to know. Thanks in advance!

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7 hours ago, SarahWelsh said:

Hi all! I have zero knowledge of Thai but I interviewed a Thai person for a uni module I'm taking. She told me about a Thai proverb that means something like "You don't know her, but you want to get to know her". She wrote it down (with latin script) for me like this: chan key rong jak taé chai mai 

 

Can anyone confirm whether this is the right proverb and if this is the right translation? I would be very interested to know. Thanks in advance!

Chan khey roo jak ter

I used to know you?

Chai Mai   

is That correct

 

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30 minutes ago, digbeth said:

Chan khey roo jak ter

I used to know you?

Chai Mai   

is That correct

 

That is very good digbeth, I wondered why a question. I tried googling ฉันขี้รู้จักเธอ but couldn’t get anything past ขี้ understandably. 

So the Thai was interpreting a chat up line “ Do I know you? “ I would not call that a proverb. 

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27 minutes ago, tgeezer said:

That is very good digbeth, I wondered why a question. I tried googling ฉันขี้รู้จักเธอ but couldn’t get anything past ขี้ understandably. 

So the Thai was interpreting a chat up line “ Do I know you? “ I would not call that a proverb. 

ฉัน เคย รู้จักเธอ not ขี้ 

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Right, so it can be translated to

"I used to know you, is that correct?"

She explained it as a proverb or saying that showed the social side of Thai - they would talk to someone even if they didn't know them because Thai are super friendly according to her. So it's just a pickup line then? Nothing more? Or could there be another interpetation?

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Actually the phonetics don’t make sense, digbeth changed ‘rong’ to ‘ru’.  So then word for word it would be  “I before know you, right?” It is a simple question. 

 

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  • 2 months later...
21 hours ago, kenk24 said:

delayed reaction?

That is a very old thread but no, not delayed reaction but little or no reaction to the first rude description ไหกระเทยมต่อขา “Garlic pickle jar with legs” but a bad reaction to the second ตุ้มน้ำเดิน “Walking water jar”.   
I think that the first one doesn’t make sense because although one can’t imagine attaching legs to one of those big water storage jars it could be done.  
Whereas a garlic pickle jar can never walk, so must refer to a person.  

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