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Achilles Tendon pain from Aircon?


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For the past 2 days I am experiencing a sharp pain when I walk the certain way (example, go down the stairs or stand on fingertoes).

 

I am suspecting this is somehow related to the aircon as I noticed that every morning after I wake up I have trouble walking down the stairs as I get the pain around my heels and tendons. This pain goes away after 30 minutes after which I feel normal. In the past few days, however, the pain remains during the day. I am pretty tall and at night my feet stay uncovered while the aircon is blowing. The same sometimes happens with my back. Is this aircon related or something else? I wear comfortable shoes and I don't do any strenuous exercises that would tear my  tendons or even cause pain.

 

 

Edited by theguyfromanotherforum
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Let me be the first to say it and spare you from further idiocy -- please contact the Ministry for Silly Walks. :smile:

 

Mate, it might be rheumatoid arthritis. I get similar pains even when no aircon is being used, so I just put it down to old age and walk it off. A cold pack, if you want to go to that trouble, can help a little. Or hot and cold treatment.

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Could be tendonitis?  There's a tendon running under the foot, and it's susceptible to small changes in your gait as you walk, and causes pain.  I had an issue created by a new pair of running shoes - and had serious foot and leg pain every morning until I replaced the shoes (I only run twice a week, and only 5k, but it was enough to cause foot pain every morning). The pain also comes back when I spend too much time at work - as the tension in my legs causes the tendon pain to return.

 

I'm guessing, but it sounds like the ac on your feet is causing muscle tension, and this is resulting in tendonitis?

 

Try wearing loose socks at night (or switch off the ac and use a fan - I'm not keen on ac at night myself), stretch your tendons by doing daily 'runners' stretches, and see how it goes.

Edited by Kinnock
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The a/c is unlikely to have anything to do with it, but it sounds like it may be the start of plantar fascitis, which is a common problem and best managed by appropriate stretching exercises, google plantar fascitis + stretches and do them regularly.

 

Especially, do  stretches each morning before getting out of bed and immediately after standing up. Do the stretches gently, you want to feel the pull but not to the point of pain.

 

Don't delay, once it really sets in it can take a year to resolve.

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5 minutes ago, Sheryl said:

The a/c is unlikely to have anything to do with it, but it sounds like it may be the start of plantar fascitis, which is a common problem and best managed by appropriate stretching exercises, google plantar fascitis + stretches and do them regularly.

 

Especially, do  stretches each morning before getting out of bed and immediately after standing up. Do the stretches gently, you want to feel the pull but not to the point of pain.

 

Don't delay, once it really sets in it can take a year to resolve.

Sounds like good advice to me. Topic is well covered at:

 

http://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/tc/plantar-fasciitis-topic-overview#1

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I have developed the same, but dont think it is primarily about aircon though that may be a factor.  What you are describing are the sort of symptoms associated with chronic achilles tendonitis

 

It's actually quite a complex area as I'm discovering.  It might be that the act of walking downstairs while not fully warmed up is the key factor.  In my case I'm now quite sure it was over exercise, and constantly walking barefoot on hard flooring. 

 

I find a foot brace/bandaging helps.  You can get some great, cheap stuff on ebay or similar.  I am also wearing house shoes and a foam heel insert (available from Tesco Lotus). 

 

Paradoxically, there are also heel dip exercises that can help.

 

However, I am not hopeful of a cure in my case without something stronger, such as a cast.  I am going to the hospital for a consultation.

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I suffered from Plantar Fascitis about 20 years ago.  I was playing a lot of golf at the time and constant walking on uneven ground in shoes that offered little proper support brought the problem on. 

Stretching exercises helped but did not eliminate the problem.  It was not until I purchased footbeds for my shoes that were specifically designed to alleviate the condition that it finally went away.  The footbeds do not have to be custom made, they just need to be the proper design and composition.  I'm sure some Googling can direct you to a supplier.

Edited by dddave
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ARch support is indeed very helpful. For those who go barefoot in the house, there are very cheap slip-on arch supports you can get online that work very well. I like the PediFix brandYou can also make an equivalent out of ace bandages

 

https://www.amazon.com/PediFix-Arch-Bandage-Size-Fits/dp/B004G8G4HU/ref=sr_1_28_s_it?s=hpc&ie=UTF8&qid=1495781839&sr=1-28&keywords=arch%2Bsupport&th=1

 

Should note that achilles tendonitis and platar fascitis are not the same thing, though some of the same exercises can help both.

 

In Achilles tendonitis, the tendon that connects the heel to the back of the leg is inflamed. It mostly occurs in joggers and people who play athletic sports. This does nto sound like what the OP reports.

 

Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of -- and often, small tears in--  the band of tissue (fascia) that runs along the sole of the foot connecting the heel top the toes.  It is extremely common in people middle aged and older. Tight achilles tendons and fallen arches/insufficient arch support are risk factors.

 

I had PF and it took more than a year to fully resolve, but after switching to shoes with arch support, no recurrences. There are brtands of sandals with these - Vionic is one, and Dr Scholls also makes some.

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1 hour ago, Sheryl said:

ARch support is indeed very helpful. For those who go barefoot in the house, there are very cheap slip-on arch supports you can get online that work very well. I like the PediFix brandYou can also make an equivalent out of ace bandages

 

https://www.amazon.com/PediFix-Arch-Bandage-Size-Fits/dp/B004G8G4HU/ref=sr_1_28_s_it?s=hpc&ie=UTF8&qid=1495781839&sr=1-28&keywords=arch%2Bsupport&th=1

 

Should note that achilles tendonitis and platar fascitis are not the same thing, though some of the same exercises can help both.

 

In Achilles tendonitis, the tendon that connects the heel to the back of the leg is inflamed. It mostly occurs in joggers and people who play athletic sports. This does nto sound like what the OP reports.

 

Plantar fasciitis is an inflammation of -- and often, small tears in--  the band of tissue (fascia) that runs along the sole of the foot connecting the heel top the toes.  It is extremely common in people middle aged and older. Tight achilles tendons and fallen arches/insufficient arch support are risk factors.

 

I had PF and it took more than a year to fully resolve, but after switching to shoes with arch support, no recurrences. There are brtands of sandals with these - Vionic is one, and Dr Scholls also makes some.

Yes the feet take a terrific pounding out here without us really taking notice.  I think its one of those aches you learn to ignore, since most of us suffer sore feet from time to time.

 

OP mentioned tip toes, coming downstairs, and tendons so I assumed he meant achilles.  Maybe he can clarify?  Achilles presents itself as a smarting pain at the top of the heel.  Or most likely as a similar ache further up.

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