Jump to content

U.S., Japan agree to enhance North Korea sanctions - White House


rooster59

Recommended Posts

U.S., Japan agree to enhance North Korea sanctions - White House

By Steve Holland

 

640x640 (4).jpg

U.S. President Donald Trump (R) and Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe shake hands during a bilateral meeting at the G7 summit in Taormina, Sicily, Italy, May 26, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

 

TAORMINA, Italy (Reuters) - U.S. President Donald Trump and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe agreed on Friday to expand sanctions against North Korea over its continued development of nuclear weapons and ballistic missiles, the White House said.

 

Pyongyang has carried out repeated missile tests in the past year, prompting an array of countries to demand tougher economic sanctions to push the isolated country towards dismantling its weapons programmes.

 

Meeting before a Group of Seven summit, Trump and Abe dedicated much of their discussion to the issue, aides said.

 

"President Trump and Prime Minister Abe agreed their teams would cooperate to enhance sanctions on North Korea, including by identifying and sanctioning entities that support North Korea's ballistic missile and nuclear programs," the White House said in a statement.

 

"They also agreed to further strengthen the alliance between the United States and Japan, to further each country's capability to deter and defend against threats from North Korea," it said.

 

Trump has said he will prevent North Korea from being able to hit the United States with a nuclear missile, a capability experts say Pyongyang could have some time after 2020.

 

"It is very much on our minds...It's a big problem, it's a world problem and it will be solved. At some point it will be solved. You can bet on that," Trump told reporters, sitting alongside Abe.

 

U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson this month called on countries all over the world to implement existing U.N. sanctions on North Korea's nuclear weapons and missile programs, adding that the U.S. administration would be willing to use secondary sanctions to target foreign companies that continue to do business with Pyongyang.

 

Norio Maruyama, a spokesman for Abe, said his prime minister had made clear at the G7 that the international community, including China, must put pressure on North Korea.

 

Abe told leaders that "at this moment, maintaining pressure is necessary," and "China has significant influence and a major role and Prime Minister Abe said China should take an even larger role," Maruyama said.

 

Most of North Korea's trade is with its ally China, and so any hard-hitting secondary sanctions would likely target Chinese firms. Maruyama did not say exactly what sanctions were being considered.

 

Speaking in Beijing, a senior U.S. State Department official said on Friday that China realised it has limited time to rein in North Korea through negotiations and that it was open to further sanctions.

 

Susan Thornton, the acting assistant secretary for East Asian and Pacific affairs told reporters the United States was looking at discussing with China a new U.N. Security Council resolution on measures to reduce delays in any response to further nuclear tests or other provocations from the North.

 

 
reuters_logo.jpg
-- © Copyright Reuters 2017-05-27
Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Abe told leaders that "at this moment, maintaining pressure is necessary," and "China has significant influence and a major role and Prime Minister Abe said China should take an even larger role," Maruyama said."

I think the prospect of serious Chinese involvement is a forlorn hope. I think the Chinese are hoping that, as North Korea's economy slowly normalizes in line with the Chinese example, its rulers will become more rational and less belligerent. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, ilostmypassword said:

"Abe told leaders that "at this moment, maintaining pressure is necessary," and "China has significant influence and a major role and Prime Minister Abe said China should take an even larger role," Maruyama said."

I think the prospect of serious Chinese involvement is a forlorn hope. I think the Chinese are hoping that, as North Korea's economy slowly normalizes in line with the Chinese example, its rulers will become more rational and less belligerent. 

If the Chinese think that Kim will calm down and be a good little boy, they are seriously delusional. He is a megalomaniac who shows no signs of changing direction.

China, by cutting off ALL exports, could bring them to their knees, but they will be highly reluctant to do it. I can see this situation ending up very messy indeed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, darksidedog said:

If the Chinese think that Kim will calm down and be a good little boy, they are seriously delusional. He is a megalomaniac who shows no signs of changing direction.

China, by cutting off ALL exports, could bring them to their knees, but they will be highly reluctant to do it. I can see this situation ending up very messy indeed.

Its obvious the Chinese are playing both sides of the fence on this like everything else they do trying to stir up S and then stand back and watch what sticks. The want to be your friendly 'Conquer the World Country" end of story. Nothing has changed over the Millennium somebody wants to rule by hook or by crook. 

Edited by elgordo38
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, darksidedog said:

If the Chinese think that Kim will calm down and be a good little boy, they are seriously delusional. He is a megalomaniac who shows no signs of changing direction.

China, by cutting off ALL exports, could bring them to their knees, but they will be highly reluctant to do it. I can see this situation ending up very messy indeed.

Are his actions any different from those of his predecessors? The North Koreans have always talked like this. That doesn't make them suicidal. Overwhelmingly, the South Koreans take a decidedly more relaxed attitude to his rantings.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.





×
×
  • Create New...